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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Late, slim, but vintage King
This collection is about 2 years late by my count (and Stephen King's, according to the introduction of it's predecessor "Nightmares and Dreamscapes") but well worth waiting for.
King has broken from his tradition of starting with a longer story, which in previous collections has acted as a barrier to the rest of the book. The brilliant "Autopsy Room...
Published on 21 Mar 2002 by G Ross (hibs4theleague@aol.com)

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not nightmarish...
Only the second collection of stories by Stephen King I've looked at. Some are quite good, especially 'LT's Theory of Pets' as it was the funniest, and 'Lunch at the Gotham Cafe', which is also funny with gory scenes that are really well written. It's obvious though, even if you read just a little of King's work, that he writes a certain type of fiction. Whatever you want...
Published 22 months ago by F Drew


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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Late, slim, but vintage King, 21 Mar 2002
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
This collection is about 2 years late by my count (and Stephen King's, according to the introduction of it's predecessor "Nightmares and Dreamscapes") but well worth waiting for.
King has broken from his tradition of starting with a longer story, which in previous collections has acted as a barrier to the rest of the book. The brilliant "Autopsy Room Four" kicks off this collection, and is short enough (compared to "Jerusalem's Lot," "The Mist," and "Dolan's Cadillac" from previous collections) that by the time you reach the longer stories, you are so engrossed that you don't even realise you're still turning pages.
Not only are the stories shorter, there are significantly less of them than there are in the previous collections. But with three prize-winners tucked away inside the covers, there is still something for everyone.
One of the traditions he has maintained, is that of adding notes about each story - telling the reader where and how inspiration struck. This adds a more personal feel to the book, as if King were writing just for you! Many Kingoholics live for these notes, and the introductions to the short story collections, to glimpse an insight into their Hero's mind, and how it works. The more "user friendly" approach of adding the notes before or after each story, instead of at the back of the book, also removes the annoying "backwards and forwards" element (if you're anything like me, you HAVE to read the notes for each story WHEN you read the story, not altogether at the end!) making for a much more enjoyable reading experience.
The one thing that always delights me about King's short stories, is the "literary quality" of them. Although I started reading King for the shocks and horror, I LOVE the way her writes short stories - all the gritty realism we have come to expect from him, but written in a more scholarly, eloquent fashion. You can see this for yourself in most of the stories in this book, particularly "The Man in the Black Suit."
Nightmares & Dreamscapes will always be my favourite, but this latest collection is another worthy addition to the volumes of King's short stories, and will keep everyone happy for another seven (or so) years!
Buy it now, steal it if you must, but make sure you get a copy.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but not his best, 17 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
There is no denying that Mr King is a superb story writer. His novels are in depth and you get the feeling of terror and inspiration with his characters as you deep further into his books.

As these are short stories (14 in all), you never get to feel that you know the characters well as the end is all to near. But then again, that is what short stories are.

These are not horror stories, but more phsycological. Autopsy Room 4, the starting story, opens this book well but as you get really into it, its the end. Some of the stories are very good, others you forget 10 minutes after reading them, but they are all good.... not outstanding. Some of these stories are old, but that is stated in the book. This is the first time they have been collated and printed together.

IF you like Steven King, then this book is worth getting to complete your set. If you are looking for a horror or a scary read, then either get another book or wait for the next new release.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The King Again, 20 Mar 2002
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
No self-respecting fan of Stephen King can afford to miss this one. But that's hardly positive press, now is it? I'll say the words, then: each and every story contained herein is worth a read. Some more so that others, it must be admitted - both In the Deathroom and All That You Love Will Be Carried Away seem little more than adventures in futility - but, for the most part, Everything's Eventual contains an outstanding selection of efforts. King could, with the short story, be perceived as "in his element," as it were - and this latest edition does much to prove such a theory. The claustrophobic terror of Autopsy Room Four, for example, reads so convincingly that the reader must wonder whether or not King spent some of his hospital time haunting such places. With it, he demonstrates an uncomfortable depth of knowledge on autopsy procedures and such things; and as such the tale is an effective and provocative one, just as frightening as The Man In the Black Suit is poignant, and as downright funny or outrageous or shocking or terrifying as most any other given short fiction. And the disturbing psychology of 1408, a thriller in every possibly sense of the word, simply must be read - by anyone, fan or otherwise.
Hell with all his critics: I like Stephen King. There are some tales contained within Everything's Eventual - of calibre great enough to warrant such deserved acclaim as the O. Henry award for Best Short Story, back in '96 - and it stands alone, independent of its author and his assured readership, as a triumph in both scope and execution. King writes with a deft and professional touch, and reads in smooth, easy-to-swallow chunks. His tales are rich and varied, and punctuated with honest interludes by way of introduction or afterword that make me lust after another On Writing. These personal touches are as down-to-earth and everyday as one might wish for, and I can't help but admit that not only am I an admirer of King's fiction, but also the author himself; he seems a frank and wise gentleman, and just the sort that I'd be honoured to call a friend.
With regards to the collection itself: it has my blessing, and my recommendation. If you aren't a King fan, for whatever reason, then you aren't a King fan - that much is given - but for all those of you with open enough minds to accept good, entertaining fiction for what it is: you'd be missing out on something quite special without a copy of Everything's Eventual. Of course it has its lowlights, if I may coin such a phrase - but their number pales in comparison to that of the countless wonders this edition presents. The author is a rare and comforting presence in the literary world of today, and Everything's Eventual offers yet another opportunity for the public to "discover" Stephen King all over again.
And believe me when I tell you he's worth discovering.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Everything" comes to those who wait(ed)...., 31 Mar 2002
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
Nine years on from his last short story collection, this new King compendium illustrates perfectly just how his writing has developed.
The stories featured in "Everything's Eventual" do not exclusively focus on the "gross out" (no killer zombies, sinister beer cans or deadly novelty chattery feet), but are far more reflective in tone and concentrate on human nature - think "Hearts In Atlantis" rather than "Christine".
This is not to say that King has adandoned sinister subject matter - just that this collection features a broad spread of his work. There are plenty of moments to make you shudder ("Autopsy Room Four" is the one that will haunt me for a while), but also an array of stories that are more reflective in tone and feature characters that stay with you long after reading - and for all those "Dark Tower" fans, there is even a prelude to "The Gunslinger" to keep you going until installment five is released !
In truth, most of King's "Constant Readers" will probably have already read many of the stories in this collection, as they have appeared elsewhere. I would still recommend this book, however, as the diversity of stories and subject matter are a joy to experience in one volume - and similarly, the new King reader may be pleasantly surprised.
If you are looking for out-and-out horror fiction, "Everythings Eventual" may disappoint (try a local jumble sale for used copies of "The Pan Book of Horror"). If, however, a collection of well written and often thought provoking short stories appeal to you, I would certainly recommend this book. "Everything's Eventual" is, however, not for the prudish or squeamish - this is still King after all....!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb short stories, 23 Dec 2002
By 
Jay M "jay_mc" (Dublin, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
As King admits, the art of the short story is dying. It's a real shame, but at least we have someone as talented as Stephen King to keep up the art at this time.
I've always enjoyed King's short stories, more so than his novels, for some reason. 'Night Shift' being my all time fave. 'Nightmares and Dreamscapes' was an magnificient follow up. The short story, 'Crouch End', is one of the best things he's ever written.
So when I heard a new book of his short stories was coming out, you could guess my reaction! As I was reading this book I noticed Stephen had lost none of his spark and it lived up to my already lofty expectations of him!
There are some real chillers in here. 'The Man in the Black Suit' is a brilliant story. 'The Death of Jack Hamilton' is not really in the true King style of things, it's a story about the notorious gangster John Dillinger, but it's excellent nonetheless. That's the great thing about Stephen, whatever style he chooses to write, he does it so well.
A must buy for all you King fans out there, and don't let the short story die out, get this now.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great collection, 1 Feb 2004
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Paperback)
This is the first short story book that i have read from King and if the previous few are as good as this then i'm in for a treat.
There are fourteen stories here and not one lasts more than say 80 pages, meaning they truely are what they say.
As would be expected, some are significantly better than others. Stories such as 'luckey quarter' and 'all that you love will be taken away' are short if not sweet but are enjoyable. There are some which are outright Horror such as 'the road virus heads North'and '1608'which are about a haunted/possessed painting and Hotel room respectively.Check out 'riding the Bullet' as well about a kid who hitchhikes and gets more than he bargined for. 'The man in the black suit' goes right to the source of evil describing how one boy unfortunately meets the devil one day.
Two of the best shorts here are 'Lunch at the Gothem cafe' and 'L.T's theory of pets' (Kings' personal favourite)which are both about Divorce but are really well written and disturbing that you'll fly through reading them.
The reason i bought the book is because i love the Dark tower and King doesn't let the fans down here as another piece of the jigsaw of Rolands' past is placed. 'The Little sisters of Eluira' is set just before 'the gunslinger' and a fair while after 'wizard and glass'. Roland enters a deserted town but after a while is fighting for his life as something much sinister in the town threatens it. As King says himself this story can be enjoyed as a stand alone story so if you're not a DT fan, don't let that put you off. The title story 'everythings' eventual' also has DT connections but the main point to the piece is about how a gifted young man is manipulated and covertly forced to harm people.
There are however a few truely poor stories here, the worst being about deja vu, the concept is good but doesn't come across well. Likewise,'the road virus heads North' when compared with say 'riding the Bullet' and the brillant 'autopsy room four' is a very poor effort.
That said, the majority are fantastic and i highly reccommend it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful collection, 19 July 2002
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
Stephen King is a master of the short story, there is no doubt about that. In Skeleton Crew, Stephen King remarked that a short story is like "a kiss in the dark from a stranger." He goes on to say that although that is not the same as an affair or a marriage, that kisses can be sweet and "their very brevity forms their own attraction." While some of his novels can strain your lower back when you lift them, and The Stand and the Dark Tower series are phenomenal examples of King's prowess as a storyteller, some of the most engaging and entertaining fiction that Stephen King has ever written has come in short story form. When I was a teenager I plowed through Night Shift (the cool cover with its peering eyes and the disturbing inner cover gave me nightmares) and King's short stories led me to the short fiction of Ray Bradbury and Roald Dahl and many others. In the introduction to Everything's Eventual King bemoans the fate of short stories and pleads with us to keep it alive with our interest and our attention. His best argument for the continued survival of the form is contained in the stories that follow his introduction. I won't tell you anything about them...you need to go get this book and read them yourself. But don't buy it just because it's by Stephen King...buy it because these kisses in the dark are so worthwhile.
Also: The Price of Immortality... A unique and intriguing DARK FANTASY full of plots and twists.
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4.0 out of 5 stars good variety, 11 April 2014
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This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Paperback)
Some of the stories in here are truly terrifying; particularly the 'Man in the Black Suit' and 1408. These are the best SK stories I have ever read! My only complaint is that they weren't long enough, he could've made those into full length novels. LT's theory of pets and Everything's eventual were extremely witty and amusing as well as creepy in places... The little sisters of Euria was rubbish though and very long (I didn't see the point of it). Prevented me giving this book a 5 star review. All in all worth buying though
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good., 10 Feb 2014
This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Hardcover)
I am a long time fan of Stephen King.
Don't get me wrong, I'm not a frothing at the mouth fanboy, and sometimes he can be a bit hit and miss.

That said, this is my favourite collection of short stories (I don't count Four Past Midnight as short stories - that is my favourite collection of novellas), with the title tale being perhaps the most eery and inspiring scribbling I have read in many years.

And yet there are others. "Autopsy Room 4" is a quirky variant on the "locked in a tomb" favoured by victorian authors, with an added sexual twist.

"1408" will be known to most King fans as the Cussack-Jackson movie, and this story lack none of the weird punch of that film.

There are some that are not as strong as others. I found "Lunch at the Gotham Cafe" a bit middling, whilst "The Death of Jack Hamilton" never really got going for me, and was perhaps a little too close to Lovecraft. Don't get me wrong, I like Lovecraft but if I want to read him, I will.

On the whole, an excellent collection.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An autopsy of..., 14 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Everything's Eventual (Paperback)
If you love the creative genius of King but struggle with the length of some of his novels then this is a great book to read. Such a mixture of styles and terrors. There is bound to be at-least one story that'll keep you up at night. "The road virus heads north" chilled me to the very core and "The man in the black suit" took me back to the fears every child has while growing up. I didn't completely understand the prequel to the dark tower series that is included in here and a few of the other stories were less interesting, but well worth your time.
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Everything's Eventual
Everything's Eventual by Stephen King (Hardcover - 19 Mar 2002)
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