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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The War ends - but who won?, 20 July 2001
By 
S. Flaherty "steve3742" (Nottingham) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Great War: Breakthroughs (Paperback)
Finally volume 3 comes out. The problem about reading multi-volume series is that you end up waiting for months to find out what happened. Those people like me who have been waiting for this will understand.
As the title implies, the war ends here. I'll not reveal who won, that might spoil the book. I will say that the victory seems credible. Turtledove has obviously put a lot of thought and research into this. The story pans out logically and inevitably to its conclusion with, as always with Turtledove, a few more favourite characters dying along the way.
So where will things go now? Well it's a historical fact that the First World War caused the Second World War and the entire book seems to be hinting at such a sequel. Like I said, in a review of an earlier volume, it looks like Turtledove is exploring the ideas of Communism and Fascism being American ideas, either in the USA or the CSA (or possibly one in each!). This would seem to be the plan for the next book with the defeated American Country (CSA or USA) looking ripe for a fascist takeover. A candidate for American Hitler seems to have already been introduced.
And this is the main problem with multi-volume stories. No sooner do you finish one volume than you want to read the next!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turtledove fans will not be disappointed., 13 Aug 2000
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Once again Harry Turtledove delivers the goods in this the most plausible of alternate timelines. The most interesting thing I have found about this book,indeed the series so far,is how my allegiance has changed from the U.S. to the C.S.A.(O.K, I am British and they are on our side!) Despite changing between many different characters the narrative is smooth, and tells the story of this war superbly. Definitely " couldn't put it down" reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another Harry T alternative history, 16 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Great War: Breakthroughs (Paperback)
I'm a great fan of HT books and this one did not disappoint. Took a while to get my head around this particular scenario, a real alternate history, but I did enjoy it. In depth characters in believable roles and situations. I am looking forward to reading the other books in this series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good., 25 Aug 2013
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A fine conclusion to the series, but strong hints are given of more trouble to come between North and South, I'm looking for the next book already.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Best of the trilogy, 1 May 2012
This review is from: The Great War: Breakthroughs (Paperback)
The final book of The Great War trilogy but the fourth book in the larger 11 volume alternative history epic that imagines how things might have turned out if the South had won the American Civil War.

For me, this is the best book of the trilogy. It has been fairly obvious how the war itself was going to turn out but there are seeds being planted here that I'm sure will spawn major plot lines in future books in the series. It does appear to be somewhat mirroring the actual dreadful events that occured in Europe but it has still piqued my interest.

The book, set almost entirely in North America, tells the story of a goodly assortment of characters who are in the thick of the action. George Armstrong Custer (a pompous, bumbling idiot and great fun) is really the only senior figure at this point although like I said previously it looks like a lot of the other characters are going to become major players in future global events. Each chapter is broken up into smaller sections concentrating on one of the characters. Their paths do cross but only occasionally. It's a format that the author has used before and it works well enough.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent alternate history, 14 Jan 2009
By 
M. J. Bourne "vandering" (Cumbria UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the third and final instalment of an alternate World War One based around the supposition that the South was able to win the American Civil War. Fifty years on the Great War gives the two sides the opportunity for a rematch, with the Confederacy allied to the French, British and Russians, whilst the USA backs Germany and Austria-Hungary.

This is not simply an excuse to bring the horrors of trench warfare onto the American continent. Although many of the characters take part in the fighting, details of the various military operations are kept muted. The emphasis is overwhelmingly on the effects the war has on ordinary people. The book jumps between over twenty separate situations, each with their own cast, the unfolding story of the conflict being the unifying factor. Mostly these different sets of characters never meet, and it says a lot for the quality of the writing that your interest is still completely maintained.

It has to be said that some of the threads are more satisfying than others. The poorer ones are rather abruptly resolved in "Breakthroughs". The more interesting ones are left open, obviously paving the way for the next series. The disadvantage of alternate history is that the further one moves from where history branches, the less relevant the examination of social trends becomes. However, this storyline is certainly strong enough for another series, and you can have great fun guessing the parts certain characters will be playing!

All in all, this is an enlightening examination of American social history, expertly written by an author who understands his subject. Highly recommended.
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The Great War: Breakthroughs
The Great War: Breakthroughs by Harry Turtledove (Paperback - 19 July 2001)
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