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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2001
Combining history of art with travel commentary, this book presents the humanism and humanity of trecento art in Tuscany, Rome and Umbria. Its themes deal with love, the transcendence of genius, recognition and reconnection. Woven through these ambitious themes is a love story of two artists for one woman and for art itself. The characters are well-fleshed out, although Tullio is overblessed with virtues, but generally there is enough intellectual connective tissue to hold the reader's interest. Make no mistake, though, the stars of this novel are from the trecento.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 13 May 2003
Setting: Contemporary Italy. A painter is reaching a crisis in his life, heightened by the arrival of a mysterious young painter in the flat below.
Synopsis: Tullio, a painter now middle-aged is reaching a crisis point in his life His wife Claudia is invited to sit for a young painter occupying the flat below. Tullio becomes forcefully aware of the younger painter's talent when he sees the painting of his wife. The reader is led along the path to believe that she is about to leave her husband for the younger, more talented painter. Tullio, meanwhile is enjoying unprecedented success as a tour guide.
The book positively drips with Italian culture and asks many of the questions asked by the uninitiated about art and ultimately questions the worth of intellectual analysis of art. Worth reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 30 January 2003
I had been looking for this book for over a year and a half, having read a review in a local magazine. When at last, I got my hands on a copy, I wasn't disappointed.
This is a beautifully written, gentle book, which transports you completely to Italy. You are not just reading about the characters, you are there with them.
The book follows the main character Tullio, a painter, as he strives to once again find the inspiration in his life. Join him as he discovers the real purpose of his life.
This is a love story, a guide to Italian art and a wonderful book. Don't miss it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 March 2003
This book is a delight to read. Adamson has the ability to get inside the minds of his characters. Apart from the main story and the gentle subplot, this book is also an excellent introduction to the art and sculpture of the Renaissance. He obviously knows his subject and has researched the story well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 April 2002
This is a most enjoyable book. I love the way the author writes about painting and paintings. It manages to be evocative and compelling as well as gentle and tender. A must for all art-lovers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 9 April 2002
I would urge you to...read this book for yourself. Yes some people might regard it as a bit pretentious but I thought it was very moving and thoroughly enjoyable.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 March 2001
Full of consciously luscious imagery, and that over-use of adjectives our basic English teachers warned us against, this book exudes 'attempt'. The author is far too aware of his effect and not enough aware of his subject. The story has gorgeous potential; an older artist bull, feeling his frailty, faces a younger artist bull who is not merely in his tubercular prime but who fancies the older bull's wife. It's a primal yarn for god's sake! This could be a classic tale. But sadly, the author shows an immaturity, in allowing his hope for the tale, to dominate his story-telling. And the story suffers in the telling. Books are to be read. Let's not all aim for movie rights eh! (Don't forget "Chocolat")
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