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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great series/great book!
Now, this is only my second taste of Peter Robinson. My first came when I eagerly read Gallows View the first Inspector Banks novel, and came away suitably impressed. Impetuous as I am, I decided to abandon series order and read this latest one. Naughty, but true. Needless to say, I am now positive that I have been missing out on a great series.
In the summer of...
Published on 7 Jan 2004 by RachelWalker

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Solved a few mysteries.
This has been hinted at in other books and it was good to have the mystery solved. I like Banks and his team, his cases are systematically solved in good old fashioned detective work.
Published 14 months ago by Kate the Great


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great series/great book!, 7 Jan 2004
By 
RachelWalker "RachelW" (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Now, this is only my second taste of Peter Robinson. My first came when I eagerly read Gallows View the first Inspector Banks novel, and came away suitably impressed. Impetuous as I am, I decided to abandon series order and read this latest one. Naughty, but true. Needless to say, I am now positive that I have been missing out on a great series.
In the summer of 1965, Graham Marshall, a young boy and friend of Alan Banks, disappeared into thin air while on his paper round. Now, decades later, some human bones are unearthed not ten miles from his home. They are quickly identified as Graham's.
Alan Banks is holidaying in Greece (recuperating from his last, affecting case) when he reads of the discovery of his old friend's remains in a newspaper, and promptly decides that it's time to return to see if he can lend a hand.
While all this is going on, another young boy disappears in Yorkshire, and while the dual cases are entirely unconnected, for Banks they still hold eerie similarities, as they echo each other across the gap of years. Then, curious memories begin to surface about his old friend. Memories which may have a bearing upon what happened, and memories that Banks now wants explaining...
It is clear that Chief Inspector Banks has remained the likeable, delightfully realistic protagonist that I met in Gallows View, and I suspect that for long-term fans it'll be a great treat to meet, as we do in this book, his parents.
This is often a very nostalgic novel, giving us insight into Bank's childhood at the same time as being both moving and haunting. The writing is clean and sharp, the plot is good (although nothing extra special) and structured well, he develops his characters adequately (in fact, I am probably missing out a little due to not reading the series in order), and they are very interesting. Although I would like to have got to know Michelle Hart a bit better. But then, I expect he's storing that up for the next one... The police procedural aspects are handled with the skill and knowledge of a seasoned profession, and at times he certainly shows himself to be more than qualified to challenge such greats in the field of British police procedure as Ian Rankin and Reginald Hill.
The solutions to both parallel mysteries are satisfying and quite unexpected. Existing fans of Banks (and I now count myself most definitely among them) are sure to be pleased with this novel, as are readers new to him. (Although, those of you that are new to him, I would, in retrospect, recommend reading the series completely in order.)
Ian Rankin clearly has some hot competition following hot on his heels.
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103 of 107 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Doubling up, 18 May 2005
By 
Mme Roslyn Mor "rosmor3" (Fontainebleau, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have read all of Peter Robinson's novels and suspect that the Mass Market editions are all reprints of other titles.This book was originally titled The Summer That Never Was, as first class a read as we have come to expect from this author. Is it necessary to go to the ISBN numbers to avoid buying the same book twice? I'd be grateful for some feedback on this subject.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Double titles, 2 Oct 2007
By 
K. Wolf "Francophile" (SF Bay Area CA.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have found that the safest way to buy Peter Robinson and Ian Rankin Books is through Amazon UK. I live in the US and they are always changing the titles. As I have traveled frequently to the UK over the years, I found that the Robinson and Rankin titles I often thought to be new books I hadn't seen, turned out to be the original tiles. After duplicating several books, I have found it just safer, if more expensive, to order the books directly from the UK when they are first published.
As a fan of Peter Robinson, I only gave this a 4 star rating as it just wasn't as strong a story. But, from here on out, it just gets better...
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent -- Pete Robinson's best yet, 3 Feb 2003
By 
M. Seymour "amikeseymour" (Europe) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Summer That Never Was (The Inspector Banks series) (Hardcover)
I've been a fan of Inspector Alan Banks and Peter Robinson for about 12 years and religiously buy all his new books. This is perhaps the best yet. I would urge anyone to try and read the Banks novels in order as you will gain more from the characterisation and understand some of Banks' 'demons' if you do so. Highly recommended, not just this one but the whole series. And doubly so for any Leeds readers as Pete Robinson drops in lots of local colour
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56 of 61 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Close to home = Summer that never was, 14 May 2003
By 
olivia (Vancouver, Canada) - See all my reviews
The site is a little misleading: Summer that Never Was is, I believe, the original Canadian title while Close to Home is the title used by American publishers. Either way- fine novel though perhaps not as strong as others he's written.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great crime novel, 15 Jan 2003
By 
RachelWalker "RachelW" (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Summer That Never Was (The Inspector Banks series) (Hardcover)
Now, this is only my second taste of Peter Robinson. My first came when I eagerly read Gallows View the first Inspector Banks novel, and came away suitably impressed. Impetuous as I am, I decided to abandon series order and read this latest one. Naughty, but true. Needless to say, I am now positive that I have been missing out on a great series.
In the summer of 1965, Graham Marshall, a young boy and friend of Alan Banks, disappeared into thin air while on his paper round. Now, decades later, some human bones are unearthed not ten miles from his home. They are quickly identified as Graham’s.
Alan Banks is holidaying in Greece (recuperating from his last, affecting case) when he reads of the discovery of his old friend’s remains in a newspaper, and promptly decides that it’s time to return to see if he can lend a hand.
While all this is going on, another young boy disappears in Yorkshire, and while the dual cases are entirely unconnected, for Banks they still hold eerie similarities, as they echo each other across the gap of years. Then, curious memories begin to surface about his old friend. Memories which may have a bearing upon what happened, and memories that Banks now wants explaining…
It is clear that Chief Inspector Banks has remained the likeable, delightfully realistic protagonist that I met in Gallows View, and I suspect that for long-term fans it’ll be a great treat to meet, as we do in this book, his parents.
This is often a very nostalgic novel, giving us insight into Bank’s childhood at the same time as being both moving and haunting. The writing is clean and sharp, the plot is good (although nothing extra special) and structured well, he develops his characters adequately (in fact, I am probably missing out a little due to not reading the series in order), and they are very interesting. Although I would like to have got to know Michelle Hart a bit better. But then, I expect he’s storing that up for the next one… The police procedural aspects are handled with the skill and knowledge of a seasoned profession, and at times he certainly shows himself to be more than qualified to challenge such greats in the field of British police procedure as Ian Rankin and Reginald Hill.
The solutions to both parallel mysteries are satisfying and quite unexpected. Existing fans of Banks (and I now count myself most definitely among them) are sure to be pleased with this novel, as are readers new to him. (Although, those of you that are new to him, I would, in retrospect, recommend reading the series completely in order.)
Ian Rankin clearly has some hot competition following hot on his heels.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reliving past nightmares ( b-o.jonsson@hotmail.com), 13 Dec 2004
By 
B. Jonsson "Literate Warlock" (falun, dalarna sweden) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
D I Banks has to go back to his adolescent years, when the remains of his childhood friend are found, buried since the late sixties. The case, however emotional for Banks, seems a straightforward murder case, but as the investigation goes on, Banks find himself remembering things about his friend.
Why was he so gloony that summer? What was he actually upp to?
He makes a promise to his old time friend's parents that he will find out the truth.Being forced to go back to his old town, living with his parents(his ever so nice mother and his father who hates cops) he discovers unsettling clues to his friends life.Once a close friend of the victim, Banks finds himself a suspect himself.When attacked outside the pub, he understands that he is uncomfortably close to the killer..

Brilliant book, full of old memories, guilt and misunderstandings. Robinson's books are among the best British crime fiction works in the world today !
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant read., 16 Oct 2003
By A Customer
This was my second Peter Robinson book, the other being Aftermath. I did not expect this to be as good as Aftermath. I was pleasantly surprised. Great plot and very believable characters.Why is it that British crime authors are so much better at this genre than Americans?
If you want a good read that is clever but does not go beyond the realms of possibility, read Peter Robinson.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Standard - as high as ever, 10 Mar 2004
By 
Tim Chaney "soloinsoho" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is my 6th Peter Robinson Inspector Banks books and they never fail to give complete satisfaction. I've read them out of sequence so am dotting about a bit with his personal relationships but it makes no difference to the enjoyment each book gives.
The Inspector Banks character is completely believeable and the settings, characters and investigations reallife. The detection work is amazing and it a joy to see results unfold and form a conclusion.
Peter Robinson's books are great and I look forward to reading 6 more.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great nolstagic thriller, 24 May 2004
By 
Robinson always writes a fine crime novel. An author who always delivers an intriguing story set in a partoicular period. This time Inspector Banks remebers his childhood. And Robinson brillantly recalls the Sixties through the music of the time. It was spot on. As for the two crimes being solved similtaneously they neatly dovetail and keep you guessing. I am also enjoying the development of the Banks character and his family life. You really do want to know how his life and his career will develop.
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The Summer That Never Was (The Inspector Banks series)
The Summer That Never Was (The Inspector Banks series) by Peter Robinson (Hardcover - 3 Jan 2003)
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