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4.6 out of 5 stars174
4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 23 January 2002
First of all the plot in this excellent novel is not a comfortable one and although the book is easy to get into it will no doubt not suit everyone. Acting Superintendant Alan Banks is having a pretty tough time at this point in his life. His wife is divorcing him, his kids are grown up and his current love interest is akin to catching a bar of soap in the bath. He is managing an investigation into the Chameleon Killer with little success and the world rests weary on his shoulders. However a chance call to a domestic disturbance starts to unravel the disappearances of the missing teenage girls and Banks ends up with his most traumatic case to date.
For those unfamiliar with this wonderful character this would not be the worst place to start as the novel not only refers back to previous cases (novels) and happier times but perhaps for the first time in this series we spend most of the time with Banks and see what the stresses of the job are doing and indeed have done to him. Peter Robinson has developed Banks so much over the past 15 years that as in real life the man who investigated the murders in Gallows View is different to the man who gets to the bottom of it all by the end of Aftermath. If you like your thrillers to have depth and to be pacy, full of twists with real life locations then I cannot recommend this novel enough. Stick with it because the surprise is bound to get you.
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on 5 March 2003
This was quite eagerly awaited as the last Banks I read was superb ( Cold is the Grave)
This was a compulsive read. Like other Robinson novels, it seeks to involve the reader and treat the issues in an intelligent and realistic manner. Those who pick this as their first Banks may be confused by the major characters but previous novels should be read to see that the story lines are cleverly plotted and Banks' relationships followed through in a seamless manner.
To the plot, it could be argued that this type of novel is done to death ( sorry) given the detailed police procedural narrative. However, what is outstanding here is the very well identified fallabilitiy of ordinary policeman involved in a high profile investigation where the failure of adequate supervision due to under resourcing evidentially leads to ( a la Yorkshire Ripper) failure to identify a serial killer before other deaths arise. OK maybe this to is cliched but it is done so well that you accept the premise.
Banks is again well drawn and whilst you can say that there are too many dectectives in current fiction who have relationship and emotional issues these identified here are a continuing theme from previous novels and can be seen as related to the strains of committed police work at the high level. The closed environment surrounding a high profile case could not have been better told and the examination of the media to events never less than credible.
I must admit I could not put this book down and ultimately one of its strengths is the gripping narrative and ( perhaps surprisingly) lack of sub plot. The compulsive nature of the need to seek the truth has never been better detailed.
Where it failed to attain 5 stars( I am not a willing giver of such an accolade) was in the fact that it seemed the author had an intense desire to tidy up the loose ends and end the novel in a somewhat abrupt manner-quite why I am not sure. . As Robinson seems content to let the reader begin to see that Banks is increasingly disenchanted with policing, this theme and the political nature of Police and excessive force in attempting arrests could have been carried over to the next novel.
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on 23 April 2008
I have read every one of the Inspector Banks novels in order. I am now up to Aftermath and this proves that the series is going from strength to strength. The early novels were short but later they have become more in depth with character development.
The first chapter could easily be the last chapter of many a crime novel.
A neighbour reports a domestic in a neighbour's house. Two constables respond to this and stumble upon the home of the Chameleon a serial killer that Yorkshire police have been chasing for months. The killer Payne has knocked his wife Lucy unconscious. He attacks the constables and kills one but the other constable manages to knock him unconscious.

The remainder of the story is the aftermath for those involved.
Banks has to make sense of all the bodies in the cellar. He investigates the past of Lucy to see if she was involved.
Annie Cabbot has to find out if the police constable used excessive force in arresting Payne.
We see the effect this has on Cabbot and the constable.
Also the life of the neighbour who phoned in the domestic unravels.

As ever Robinson progresses the lives of the two main characters Banks and Cabbot. There is also a return for psychologist Jenny Fuller who looked in the early novels that she would be a main character but does not feature in later novels.

As ever Robinson keeps the story flowing. His dialogue is realistic and there are the usual twists along the way. If you enjoy crime novels and have not read any of Inspector Banks I recommend that you do.
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on 4 August 2009
This is a rattling good read! I've read quite a number of Inspector Banks crime novels and they just keep getting better. It might sound pretentious but I was half convinced it was a real case being described. Two patrol officers are called to a house because of a reported domestic disturbance. What they find is truly horrific and is redolent of the Fred and Rosemary West case.
In this novel Banks is an acting superintendent and is finding the responsibility too much. Peter Robinson once again demonstrates his supreme skill as a writer. His narrative keeps you on the edge of your seat, often you feel you know what is going to happen, but Robinson trips you up unexpectedly. I would not dream of suggesting the Peter Robinson is the new Ian Rankin, but he is equally as good, in some ways better. Inspector Banks is not the new Rebus; he is a much more engaging character than that. Highly recommended, buy it, or put in on your Christmas list.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 14 November 2007
Although I read a lot of crime fiction I have to admit that AFTERMATH has been my first experiment with anything written by Peter Robinson. The great news is that not only is it a fine novel in its genre but there are, at the time of writing, eighteen others in the Robinson portfolio stretching back to 1987 and by all accounts the standard is high across the entire range. It's easy to understand why he has such a wide and enthusiastic following, because all the basic elements are there to enjoy: suspense, pace, mystery, interesting characters and a storyline that is credible yet extraordinary too; sadly such weird people as described in this fictional tale clearly do exist in real life.

The setting is Yorkshire and from the outset Robinson's long-term hero DI Alan Banks and his team have been pursuing a serial killer nicknamed the Chameleon - but who appears to have been caught in the act. The title of the novel is quite apt because the remainder of the story is indeed a description of what happens over the next couple of weeks, which will include the unravelling of this mystery while the reader doubtlessly tries to second-guess the police procedure in order to figure out the trademark 'Robinson twist' at the end. I would have given this book 5 stars if I had been completely fooled, as I wanted to be, but the truth is that I found it rather easy to spot the red herring and from an early stage I knew the identity of the Chameleon, sooner than I would have expected a cop as smart as DI Banks to do. That aside I enjoyed this tale immensely and I will quickly stock up on most if not all of the Inspector Banks novels, as I can tell from just this one that Peter Robinson is an author worth investing time and money in.
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on 9 October 2002
This was the first Peter Robinson book I had read, and my introduction to Inspector Banks. The whole detective genre is getting a bit stale now, and this really does not redress the balance, a detective with family problems, a few ambitious sidekicks, a love interest within the job, and a forensic psychologist that noone ever takes seriously. However once you get over that you get into a really gripping story that you will not want to put down. A series of abductions, and presumed deaths of young girls has taken place, and instead of the book taking you through the investigation and subsequent revlation of the guilty party it starts off with the identification of the abductor in the most explosive of ways. The book concentrates then on the fallout of the crimes, and delves back into the pasts of the guilty party, shedding light on what may have caused their deviant behaviour..I would say the only bad point of the book is the character of the cop under investigation of heavy handidness, I feel the character was weakly developed, and never really got going, to the point that you didn't really make a connection with the character or care what happened. Also like so many of these types of books, the end came too soon, whether because my enjoyment was so great that I wanted it to go on, or, as I suspect a page limit was approaching and it was time to wrap things up (why do so many modern books give me this impression).
Will I read more Robinson books about Inspector Banks ? You can be assurred that I will, and I will keep a keen eye out for the next installments in this series.
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Peter Robinson grew up in Yorkshire, and is the author of a number of previous novels featuring Inspector Banks. He is the winner of numerous awards in the United States, Britain and Canada, and in 2002 he won the CWA Dagger in the Library. As I also come from Leeds the background to his stories is something that I have experienced first hand and because of this I have a special affection for his books. However they would be first class crime fiction wherever they were based.

Two police constables are sent to an ordinary house, situated in an ordinary street, nothing unusual about that, but it is about to become infamous. The police officers are sent to the house to investigate complaints of a domestic disturbance. What they stumble upon is truly horrific scene which leaves one of the officers dead and the other one fighting for her life and her career.

The identity of a serial killer, a person capable of blending into the background and slipping away without detection, called for want of a better word, the Chameleon has finally been revealed. But his capture is only the start of such a shocking investigation that it will even test the nerve of inspector Banks, a man hardened to the knowledge of what one human being can do to another.
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Peter Robinson grew up in Yorkshire, and is the author of a number of previous novels featuring Inspector Banks. He is the winner of numerous awards in the United States, Britain and Canada, and in 2002 he won the CWA Dagger in the Library. As I also come from Leeds the background to his stories is something that I have experienced first hand and because of this I have a special affection for his books. However they would be first class crime fiction wherever they were based.

Two police constables are sent to an ordinary house, situated in an ordinary street, nothing unusual about that, but it is about to become infamous. The police officers are sent to the house to investigate complaints of a domestic disturbance. What they stumble upon is truly horrific scene which leaves one of the officers dead and the other one fighting for her life and her career.

The identity of a serial killer, a person capable of blending into the background and slipping away without detection, called for want of a better word, the Chameleon has finally been revealed. But his capture is only the start of such a shocking investigation that it will even test the nerve of inspector Banks, a man hardened to the knowledge of what one human being can do to another.
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on 13 May 2003
Peter Robinson's Inspector Banks series goes from strength to strength. In Aftermath he tries something different and pulls it off superbly. In the first few pages we know or think we know what has happened, a serial killer's murder spree has been ended and Banks is tidying up the loose ends. His former lover Annie Cabot is brought in to investigate allegations of undue violence against one of the Police Officers, who discovered the serial killer's secrets in the basement of a surbuban house. Of course with Peter Robinson you get plot twists, interesting characters a blend of plotlines and a great police procedural. Buy it and enjoy.
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on 27 July 2010
As I work my way through the Inspector banks stories each one just gets better and better. This is not so much a who dunnit as how much has he done and what are the consequences amid political sensitivities and accusations of police over reaction. This story does this while holder our attention to the last page. I can't wait for the next story.
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