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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good finish to part 1 & 2
The final part of the three part book is as good as the other two. One of the best historical novels that I have enjoyed.
The final and probably most important part is dealt with rather speedily, probably because of the limits of space, especially his conquest of India and the defeat of Porus, supposed to have been his greatest battle.
All in all a great book...
Published on 26 Nov 2001

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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A very poor recapitulation.
I found the writing very stilted, though (as has been said) this could be the fault of the translator. I had the impression of a historian wanting to show off his knowledge, and found no real enjoyment in the tone or phraseology of the book. Fortunately, this doesn't matter, as a good trilogy on Alexander has already been written. If you don't know the books, do read...
Published on 30 Sep 2002 by Matthew Wilde


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good finish to part 1 & 2, 26 Nov 2001
By A Customer
The final part of the three part book is as good as the other two. One of the best historical novels that I have enjoyed.
The final and probably most important part is dealt with rather speedily, probably because of the limits of space, especially his conquest of India and the defeat of Porus, supposed to have been his greatest battle.
All in all a great book and a must read if you have read the other two.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A very poor recapitulation., 30 Sep 2002
I found the writing very stilted, though (as has been said) this could be the fault of the translator. I had the impression of a historian wanting to show off his knowledge, and found no real enjoyment in the tone or phraseology of the book. Fortunately, this doesn't matter, as a good trilogy on Alexander has already been written. If you don't know the books, do read Mary Renault's 'Fire From Heaven', 'The Persian Boy' and 'Funeral Games'. (Gore Vidal called them something like 'a magnificent creation and re-creation of the life of Alexander'.) I am currently reading 'The Persian Boy' for the umpteenth time - in it, I think Renault found her most mature voice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Historical Fiction, 4 April 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Alexander: Child of a Dream v. 1 (Hardcover)
Few authors can be better equipped to write about the history of ancient Greece and Rome than Valerio Massimo Manfredi. Professor of archaeology at the the university of Milan, he has carried out many excavations and expeditions in the Mediterranean region. He has produced many factual books on historical matters, mainly military and has still found the time to write several novels and this is one of the best of them.

This book is the first of a triology about probably the greatest warrior and general who has ever lived, bearing in mind that Alexander died at an age when most men are only just starting to make their mark in life. Alexander is of course one of histories most colourful and well know character. Even people with little or not interest in ancient history will have heard of Alexander, a charismatic and larger than life figure.

This first book is the story of a boy born to royal parents. His father, Philip of Macedon, a great warrior and king in his own right and his mother, Philip's alluring queen, Olympias. Alexander was a handsome boy with a quick and ready wit and great intelligence that was nurtured by his tutor, Aristotle and with friends like Ptolemy and Hephaiston Alexander was moulded into a man who was going to conquer the then known world.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent trillogy!, 12 May 2003
I would like to say that if you love stories about ancient worlds with a bit of fiction in it , you will definately like this one. The only thing that you have to make sure , is that you read both of the previous books before you crack on this one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Conclusion of the Trilogy, 4 April 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Few authors can be better equipped to write about the history of ancient Greece and Rome than Valerio Massimo Manfredi. Professor of archaeology at the university of Milan, he has carried out many excavations and expeditions in the Mediterranean region. He has produced many factual books on historical matters, mainly military and has still found the time to write several novels and this is one of the best of them.

This book is the last of a triology about probably the greatest warrior and general who has ever lived, bearing in mind that Alexander died at an age when most men are only just starting to make their mark in life. Alexander is of course one of histories most colourful and well know character. Even people with little or not interest in ancient history will have heard of Alexander, a charismatic and larger than life figure.

The final chapter in the life of Alexander sees his military might making their way into the heart of Asia and ever onwards towards the Indian sub continent. The Macedonian army is the mightiest force that has ever been seen and sweeps all before it. Virtually nobody and nothing can put any resistance in the way of its unrelenting advance.

Alexander is not just a destroyer, he has a fine brain and has an ambitious project to unite the people of the empire. This project becomes an obsession with him and he can think of nothing else, until he meets the beauty of Queen Roxanna and this gives him the strength he needs to begin to fulfill his destiny . . .
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An epic tale of a great king, 17 Jun 2001
I have read all three volumes of the book. Once you start to read the first one you can't stop reading it day and night. A finely crafted book, when finished reading the first two volumes I slowed myself down because the most brilliant story I have ever read was coming to an end..such a brilliant vision and power of imagination of the author
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must buy book, 13 July 2001
By A Customer
Having an interest in the ancient world I looked for a novel that would satisfy my curiosity and at the same time offer a stimulating, brutal adventure of a story. Having read the novel several times I can honestly say that this novel satisfies all the aforementioned criteria. What impressed me about this novel was the historical accuracy of events in Alexander's life portrayed so vividly and colourfully in the novel. From his close relationship with his mother, Olympias to his passionate affairs with Leptine, Hephaiston and most unforgetably Pancaspe, the ancient beauty, whose bewitching ways led a thousand men to stray.
Hail, to Pancaspe! Hail, to Philip, King of Macedon! Hail, to Alexander!
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Internationally Acclaimed Novel, 4 April 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Few authors can be better equipped to write about the history of ancient Greece and Rome than Valerio Massimo Manfredi. Professor of archaeology at the the university of Milan, he has carried out many excavations and expeditions in the Mediterranean region. He has produced many factual books on historical matters, mainly military and has still found the time to write several novels and this is one of the best of them.

This book is the first of a triology about probably the greatest warrior and general who has ever lived, bearing in mind that Alexander died at an age when most men are only just starting to make their mark in life. Alexander is of course one of histories most colourful and well know character. Even people with little or not interest in ancient history will have heard of Alexander, a charismatic and larger than life figure.

This first book is the story of a boy born to royal parents. His father, Philip of Macedon, a great warrior and king in his own right and his mother, Philip's alluring queen, Olympias. Alexander was a handsome boy with a quick and ready wit and great intelligence that was nurtured by his tutor, Aristotle and with friends like Ptolemy and Hephaiston Alexander was moulded into a man who was going to conquer the then known world.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unfortunately Mediocre, 25 Oct 2003
Underneath the title of this book is printed 'Huge international bestseller'. Having read it through I am at a loss as to how it has acheived this status.
The first thing that struck me was the simplistic and faulty prose. At some points it tried to be poetic while at others it was very basic. The lack of depth in writing leads to poorly developed characters which in turn strips the story of its heart. It will undoubtedly be claimed that the original language version is better and that it has simply lost some of the flow in translation. While this may be, to some extent, true I do not believe that that alone is reason enough for the lack of passion conveyed in the story.
The tale of Alexander's life is however a fascinating one and many of the bare facts are laid down in the book as Alexander grows up to become King and lead an army into Asia. Although it can never be entirely factual Manfredi does his best to stick to history and this is where I found the book to be more satisfying. The politics and warfare of the period are much more adequately told and I do now have a yearning to know more.
All in all this book is neither particularly bad nor particularly good. It is maybe a reason for historians to write history books and leave novellists to write novels. There are reasons to read this book and I did not feel as though I had wasted my time in reading it but neither was I rushing into the second in the series. I will read the next book to find out how Alexander's journey continues but I will be hoping that he becomes a more interesting character as he grows older.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacks the power and vision of Mary Renaults Alexander novels, 17 Aug 2001
Valerio Manfredi tries very hard to capture the essence of Alexander. However he does not quite make it! The characters are mainly two dimensional and lack the fire and depth of Mary Renaults Alexander triology.
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Alexander: Child of a Dream v. 1
Alexander: Child of a Dream v. 1 by Valerio Massimo Manfredi (Hardcover - 20 April 2001)
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