Customer Reviews


29 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh
Its nice to see a modern day sci fi author doing something different, Richard Morgan, William Gibson and Neal Asher all have managed to bring genres together.
In The Line of Polity Asher builds a mixture of a futuristic spy thriller with an awesome imagination and charecterisation.
Ian Cormac, Earth Central Security is in pursuit of his old foe Dragon a...
Published on 13 Dec 2003 by C. Woodhead

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Same old Asher routine, getting old but maturing, too
This is the fifth Asher novel I've read, after the two Spatterjay novels, Prador Moon and Gridlinked. When spaced apart, the novels are a fun read as they typically include wry wit and gruesome battles. The Spatterjay novels also added detailed yet horrific planetary creature, a similar system which Asher employs in Line of Polity: wit, battles and fauna. But after...
Published on 11 Oct 2011 by M-I-K-E 2theD


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh, 13 Dec 2003
By 
C. Woodhead "cwoodhead" (Sydney Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Line of Polity (Paperback)
Its nice to see a modern day sci fi author doing something different, Richard Morgan, William Gibson and Neal Asher all have managed to bring genres together.
In The Line of Polity Asher builds a mixture of a futuristic spy thriller with an awesome imagination and charecterisation.
Ian Cormac, Earth Central Security is in pursuit of his old foe Dragon a confusing malicious intergalactic being. However as ever Cormac picks up a series of enemies who in typical elite spy style are almost beneath his notice. With the witty Gant and a team of powerful individuals the action is non stop.
But wait, theres a story here as well, a story that is very well told. The story of a rebellion against a Theocracy, a tale of a young girl seeking freedom from her environment and a young man coming to terms with a completely new world.
Sound a bit musshy for yah? Don't worry theres still plenty of gun fights, shuruken based decapitations and raging scifi to keep the biggest scifi nut happy.
Damn fine show!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Same old Asher routine, getting old but maturing, too, 11 Oct 2011
By 
M-I-K-E 2theD "2theD" (The Big Mango, Thailand) - See all my reviews
This is the fifth Asher novel I've read, after the two Spatterjay novels, Prador Moon and Gridlinked. When spaced apart, the novels are a fun read as they typically include wry wit and gruesome battles. The Spatterjay novels also added detailed yet horrific planetary creature, a similar system which Asher employs in Line of Polity: wit, battles and fauna. But after reading the previous novels, the entire system is getting a bit repetitive with the endless battle scenes and homicidal native animals. Line of Polity doesn't stray far at all from Asher's signature plot and is actually quite evident towards the final 20% of the book when there are battles after endless battles all adding very little to the plot itself. A simplification would have been much appreciated to cut down on the amount of superfluous scenes. Asher is the type of battle writer who uses "a short-stock grenade-launcher for more intimate work."

The planet of Masada is where a good chunk of the book takes place, a place "you cannot draw a breath... even if its horrifying wildlife would let you." That's from the back cover of the novel... that's it, meaning not much info to go by before you buy the novel in the bookstore. A better, in book, quote about Masada is a place where "choices are limited to two - fight or die - and they are not mutually exclusive."

One more downside of the book is the villain Skellor. His name reminds me of Skeletor from the fames of He-man, Master of the Universe. Therefore, the name Skellor feels cheesy, as if it was ripped off from He-man. His presence in the novel is straight from the get-go and makes appearances all the way until the end, but what's seriously lacking is Skellor's motivation for being the villain rather than being part of the Polity.

The Polity doesn't play as big of a role in Line of Polity as it did in Gridlinked. There isn't a focus on augmentations or runcibles as it typically found in Polity society. The entire novel takes place on two distant planets and outer space. It lends little the structure of the Polity society but makes up for it by adding to the mystery surrounding the Dragon, which ended in Gridlinked. An apt foreshadowing quote would be, "That was Dragon. And my guess is that things are just about to start getting very complicated - and very deadly."

I'm interested to see how Asher will progress with the Cormac series, whether in the direction of wit and gore, a focus on Polity society or a concentration on the Dragon. The third novel in the series should answer this question- Brass Man.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Peter Hamilton's Competition, 22 May 2004
Having just put down this book - and instantly lent it to someone else to enjoy - I have to say that it is an excellent, miss your stop on the tube, read.
If you like Peter Hamilton (and I read this back to back with Pandoro's box which was a mistake cos there is some conceptual overlap between the two) then you will deffo like this.
Its space opera on a grand scale with lots of real believable human (and plenty not so human) characters, hideous monsters and super duper gadgets. The plot is 007-esque with not a dull moment and the various plot strands tie in well to a satisfying crescendo.
It IS worth reading Gridlinked (its prequel) before this, as although Ascher does sufficient back tracking in the text of this to allow a 'cold' reader to keep up, I would think that you would miss large amounts of sub-text otherwise. Luckily that's good news for you, cos Gridlinked is equally excellent.
The bottom line? Dont delay, get it today.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Asher's universe continues to mesmerize, but..., 14 Jun 2003
By 
Danny De Raymaeker (Leuven Belgium) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Line of Polity (Paperback)
Asher's latest is a sequel to "Gridlinked" and has all the good and the bad qualities of the latter. It is an action-packed space opera romp. Asher excells at painting alien ecologies with horrifying creatures and never lets the pace of his novel slump below maximum overdrive. However, this manic pace does not do much good to the fleshing out of his main characters (Gant, Cormac, Thorn and Stanton) who are disturbingly similar (tougher-than-thou humans or post-humans, all excelling at various skills of war)and cardboardy shallow. This similarity amongst the main characters is so striking that it becomes confusing : keeping track of who did exactly what in the course of the story got me in trouble several times - but hey, I have never been any good at remembering names. Tough luck : Asher continues to bombard you with new names - and sometimes rather superfluous subplots - all through the novel. The fact that I read "Gridlinked" two years ago - it beats me why Asher first published "The Skinner", before coming up with this sequel - was not very helpful either : in order to enjoy this one you 'd better reread "Gridlinked", as the author often refers to events in that novel, without too much elaboration, so you are expected to have those events very fresh in your memory. I did not. The structure of the story, with its many intertwining subplots, rather lengthy description of war events on the planet Masada and then its pretty abrupt ending (a criticism that was also valid for "Gridlinked"), could have been better.
I don't want to be too harsh. Asher's imaginative universe is well worth exploring, his style is very entertaining and I'll keep buying whatever he hammers out. Of the three novels mentioned here, I personally enjoyed his second,"The Skinner", best. A fact that got my hopes for this one maybe a bit too high up.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars ok, 11 July 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Good, not great. Big fun story, adequately told. Too many odd names and words to pronounce in you're head. My pet hate in sci-fi
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great read, 28 May 2014
By 
R. Cells (Hayling, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Once again, Neal Asher delivers a fantastic storyline with action all the way. The characters and technology are believable and the pace is fast.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 27 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A cracking good read. All guns blazing in just about every direction. Characters growing and switching sides as the story evolves. A "could not put the book down" story!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Brit Science Fiction Fan !, 24 April 2013
By 
Mr. A. J. Gooding "Ashley" (Manchester uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have only just started reading Neal Asher, Interesting stories with some some speculative but realistic thoughts on humans/ technology. Makes you think a bit!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Asher getting better and better, 4 Jan 2013
By 
Amazon Customer (Lancashire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The first book in the Agent Cormac series is good but the charcter of Cormac is a bit wooden (well so wooden you could get splinters off the page) In this book Asher starts to open up the character and give him depth. As usual with Asher brilliant Aliens gory violence and top notch space action.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars I thought this was a Cormac Book.( Still great though ), 15 Jan 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
What can I say as with all the Cormac/polity books by Neal Asher - Awesome .
the only thing I would say that I found a little off putting was the lack of the main character , this was a Cormac story and he was almost absent throughout a lot of the book , but having said that still a great read and I will continue with the polity Universe as I have still 9 books to read .
For your info if you go to his Blogg you will find a timeline in which to reads the Polity books in the right order .
It would be great if he could do some more stories on the Human Golems , human minds in Android bodies ... Brilliant .
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Line of Polity
The Line of Polity by Neal Asher (Paperback - 21 Mar 2003)
8.92
Usually dispatched within 10 to 14 days
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews