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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I think 'unputdownable' is the correct adjective
I don't know what it is. Perhaps it's the short chapters, which give you enough to get you intrigued and leave you wanting to find out what happens next. (It's one of those books where you tell yourself you've always got time for one more chapter). Or perhaps it's some force at work within the novel, something to do with Dexter's laying out of the plot, the way he moves...
Published on 9 Mar 2002

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars AMEN to Endeavour!
Although I am more of a Morse fan on the small screen than in print, I did feel that I had to read this one! (At least, I have read the first and last.) Not a great read but a good one - I think that just about sums it up. It's probably a good time to quit - when you're still on or near the top, that is - but I shall miss the old boy (and his side-kicks). A "must...
Published on 29 Oct 2000


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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I think 'unputdownable' is the correct adjective, 9 Mar 2002
By A Customer
I don't know what it is. Perhaps it's the short chapters, which give you enough to get you intrigued and leave you wanting to find out what happens next. (It's one of those books where you tell yourself you've always got time for one more chapter). Or perhaps it's some force at work within the novel, something to do with Dexter's laying out of the plot, the way he moves from one event to the next. But what is perhaps the most obvious reason for the appeal of the Morse novels (and in particular this one) is the man himself, good old Endeavour.
There's something about the character that attracts the reader. Most of Morse's most prevalent foibles, and the most notable events from his past, are brought in here. The parallels with A. E. Housman are there - an old and clever man, who never married, who failed his degree (at St. John's College, Oxford - see 'The Riddle of the Third Mile') and who finds the sight of blood and death one that is sickening and saddening. There is even a quotation from Housman as an epigraph for the book, whence Dexter got the title of this, the final mystery.
This was probably the longest of all Morse novels, yet it sustains the reader's interest, primarily because we want to see what happens to Morse. For the Morse novels have never really been about solving crime, have they? They're about the character.
The television adaptation was good too, especially when Morse (John Thaw) recited the Housman lines to Lewis. One of those lump-in-the-throat moments.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving farewell that stunned me, 28 Feb 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
Never before has an author moved me with a single word. Yet the end of this final Morse mystery reduced me to tears. A fitting end to a remarkable career, for Morse, and for the series of books that allowed us to follow his life of crime-solving. This book drew together the relationships Morse had with those around him, the effect he had on the lives of others, and a side to him that had only before been hinted at. If the end of this book is anything to go by, Colin Dextor is as upset at losing Morse as his fans are, for never has a farewell to a character felt so poignant. By far and away, the most moving novel I have ever read.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Farewell to the best detective of all times, 24 Sep 1999
By 
Rolf-ingo Behnke (Salzgitter, Germany) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
This is the final Inspector Morse novel. I read all of them and they were all excellent. This book is about Morse's last case, he solves it as always with Sergeant Lewis's help. But the case itself is not what really matters here: it is the MAN himself with all his little faults, his drinking problem, his unhappy love-affairs; the man who loves Wagner and enjoys driving his Jag; the 'loyal, honest policeman. Morse and Lewis, you both are leaving a big wide void and we'll miss you very much. THANK YOU and GOODBYE!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dexter ends the series on the highest note of all.........., 3 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Paperback)
Wonderful. the best Morse novel i have read (and i have read all of them) The plot is genuinely very intriguing, possibbly lacking in suspects though.
There is something about this novel, i just cannot place it. he does the characters in more depth than usual, and centres a little more (if possible!) on the characters of Morse and Lewis.
This is way, way, way better than the television adaptation. it is mroe relistic, and to be put on tv they had to remove many of the moct central parts of the plot. When viewing it i was highly disappoined. The people who reviewed it would have thought twice about praising it so highly had they read the book first!
There are other reasons why this book is Dexter's masterpiece, the plot, as with many of his books, is not unnecesarily complicated, and in many way's it seems to flow more. I Sped through this book in a day can you beieve, when a dexter would normally take me 2 or 3.
I even found myself shedding a tear at poor dear Morse's demise. The television adaptation again insufficiently brings this across. It would have been a lot better had they adapted it to fit two 2 hour slots. I find myself devouring every word, every sentence in the last 30 pages hitting me like a brick. If u have seen the tv version and not read the book, shame on you, you should have. If u have read the book and the tv version, you will know what i am talking about.
Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful, wonderful. genuiniely very sad.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I cried at the final chapters, 28 Nov 1999
By A Customer
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This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
A classic story. Some elements seemed to have come from previous Morse novels, this did not detract from the story line. As usual I tried to solve the mystery along with Morse ,Lewis and Strange.I knew it was the final Morse mystery but I still cried. It is at least ten years since a book has moved me to tears.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars May be the last but it's one of his best., 29 Oct 2000
By A Customer
As usual this Dexter is extremely well written,bring out the dictionary! The plot is not as devious as some of the Morse stories but it still keeps the reader guessing. The personal side of Morses' life and his relationship to his superior officer are a revealing insight into the two men. I will read it again and again.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Morse Code Comes To An End!, 29 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
To Inspector Morse fans and other knowledgeable readers, clearly the "outcome" of the venerable--but irascible--detective should be known. The book's been on the shelves long enough for the word to have gotten around. It's his swan song; author Colin Dexter says "adieu" to the series, and readers move on.
That said, "The Remorseful Day" perhaps should have read, "The Remorseful Series," as, indeed, Dexter has chosen a most apt ending for his parade of intriguing, exciting, and most worthwhile "cases." Certainly his bread and butter, the Morse series has given Dexter a most respected name in this genre and naturally it is with some sadness that we view the finale.
As such, perhaps, Dexter does not give us his best book; he didn't save the best for last. However, it seems that was not his intention. Dexter, in an interview on TV last year, indicated that "The Remorseful Day"was more a tribute to Morse than just another mystery in this popular series. Thus, he seems to give a valedictory to Morse as his primary concern and the mystery-storyline becomes secondary. He puts the final touches on Morse's character, and Morse can now "go gently into that good night."
The storyline is simple enough: a year-old murder of Yvonne Harrison is re-opened and Morse is reluctant to head the investigation; between Supt. Strange and Sgt. Lewis, of course, Morse finally is "coaxed" to enter the picture. The plot spins along at a faster pace than Dexter usually employs; he now concentrates on putting the final (pun intended) touches to Morse. It is a brave adventure, knowing there are countless Morse fans and the slightest errant way will bring forth a reader revolution! In this book, Dexter dramatically displays his ability to control absolutely the tempo of the narrative and the reader finds a faster-paced work being slowed down by the reality of the situation: it is high drama without the melodrama; it is sadness, yet Dexter handles it with literary class. It is a tribute to a favorite character and one readers are not likely to forget.
It is Morse's trip to the Elyssian Fields--where else would he go?
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4.0 out of 5 stars Morse: the End, 18 Mar 2013
By 
Brian R. Martin (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
Chief Inspector Morse, the archetypal curmudgeonly detective, music lover, functioning alcoholic who rarely buys a round, despiser of physical exercise, incurable romantic, and a constant irritant to his superiors, solves his last case in this novel by his typically unorthodox methods. It is a murder committed a year ago and initially investigated by Morse's superior, Chief Superintendent Strange, but still unsolved. Strange reopens the investigation when he receives a letter about the case saying that a prisoner due to be released `should be watched'. Morse is initially very reluctant to take the case, something that intrigues Morse's assistant, Sergeant Lewis, but has no choice when the man is murdered soon after he leaves prison, and this is followed shortly afterwards by the murder of someone else who was also a suspect at the time of the original investigation. As usual, Morse starts by getting some things wrong, while at the same time stubbornly holding to his main deductions, despite strong evidence to the contrary. Eventually his conclusions about the murders are of course proved right, although too late for Morse. Only in the final few pages is the explanation of why Morse was reluctant to take the case revealed to Lewis by Strange, and a new light is thereby shed on Morse's character.

This is a typical Morse novel (apart from the fate of Morse!), and none the worse for that. There is the usual sparring between Morse and Lewis about the minutiae of grammar and other pedantic matters, interwoven with the patient methodic detective work of Lewis and the quixotic leaps of the imagination of Morse, the latter leading to several false trails. The interaction of both with the other characters, such as Strange, the pub landlord, and the family of the murdered woman are well described, believable and not without humour. The format, many very short chapters, may not be to everyone's liking, but I found it increased the pace. Perhaps the final solution is a little too drawn out, but clever nonetheless. This may not be the best of the Morse novels, but still well worth reading.

It was pleasing that Morse's last case is published in a fine format that I am sure he would have approved - good quality paper, clear font, interesting quotations at the head of chapters, and even an integral fabric bookmark.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Goodbye to all that., 4 Oct 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
I would like to contribute a transatlantic view of "The Remorseful Day". Of course, I could not wait for US publication, so thanks to Amazon UK I was able to be the first on my block to read this lovely book. I understand that some who read Dexter for the crime may find this book too low-key in that area, but as a reader more concerned with character, I found this book most satisfying. From the first page, an autumnal golden glow covers the action. We know that this is the last book, but the puzzle is whether or not Morse will find some measure of peace as he nears the end of his journey. Morse has always lived in his head, solving his cases as he solves his crosswords, with a mixture of instinct and his own private logic. Morse's logic may take him down some blind alleys before he sees the light in a case,but his instinct is what usually find the truth. Anyone who loves music, Morrells and Glenfiddich must have the soul of an artist.In the end, he seems to have resolved the tug between his intellect and his softer side. He may not go gently, but he seems ready, for he has done the right thing. He has been blessed with good friends in Strange and Lewis. He will be remembered and mourned as he wished. By the last page, the reader, like Lewis, will know that there is a hole in his soul which will never be filled. Thank you, Colin Dexter, and may you enjoy many golden autumn days in that most beautiful of cities, Oxford.
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lovingly written farewell., 17 Oct 1999
This review is from: The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) (Hardcover)
Unfortunately, it was John Thaw himself who broke the news of Morse's passing to me on the radio, and I was determined not to find out why until I read the book. Last week I obtained a signed copy and read it every morning on my train journey into work. On Friday morning I was down to the last few pages choking back tears of my own. I think the story matters very little with this one, it is the interplay between the characters we are concerned with and Dexter does this extremely well here. He put alot of thought and attention to things, and to my mind didn't ruin the ending by doing something too corny (like promoting one of the main characters up through the ranks). Undoubtedly we will see this on television in the next few years, but read the book. The chapters are short and punchy, and I've always liked Dexter's quotations he manages to drag up to decorate his chapters with.
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The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse)
The Remorseful Day (Inspector Morse) by Colin Dexter (Hardcover - 15 Sep 1999)
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