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59 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well up to his usual high standards
Peter James continues his fine Roy Grace series with another quite superb tale. Every story is rooted in Brighton, and this one is no exception, and the inventive and original plotlines and the characterisation of the main players lift these above ordinary detective fiction. Having dealt with fraud, Internet porn, identity theft, and a host of other topics in previous...
Published on 21 Aug 2009 by Andy Edwards

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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why so long?
Don't get me wrong, I love Peter James. I snap up his novels as soon as they're available, and enjoy them all - even if they can be a bit 'same-y'. At least you know what you're getting.
But this one is much, much longer than all of the others. Great, I thought; more time for plot expansion and enjoyment of the character development. But oh dear, here's the rub - the...
Published on 2 April 2010 by Geoff Richardson


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59 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well up to his usual high standards, 21 Aug 2009
By 
Andy Edwards "staxasoul" (Essex UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dead Tomorrow (Hardcover)
Peter James continues his fine Roy Grace series with another quite superb tale. Every story is rooted in Brighton, and this one is no exception, and the inventive and original plotlines and the characterisation of the main players lift these above ordinary detective fiction. Having dealt with fraud, Internet porn, identity theft, and a host of other topics in previous novels, James turns his attention to the trade in human organs - and he does it with his customary attention to detail, to the extent that you end up feeling you have been educated as well as entertained.

Roy Grace is a satisfyingly complex character, with enough of the standard "policeman" traits to be recognisable, but with some original flaws and failings which complicate his private life (and sometimes his professional career). His colleagues are similarly brought to life, with the minimum of stereotyping, and the villains are believable and , well, villainous.

In "Dead Tomorrow" the investigation is woven with moral issues, (I won't say more, as I don't want to spoil the story), which James handles superbly, without ever preaching. The plot develops at a satisfying pace, and as the reader, you see the whole thing as the threads are brought together, but this never feels predictable, such is James skill with plot twists.

All in all a worthy addition to the series, it's just a shame we have to wait for the next one. If you are new to these, I suggest you pick up at the beginning (Dead Simple) and work forward from there - not that you can't read Dead Tomorrow as a stand alone, but you'll get so much more from it, having read the others first - oh and the nearest comparison to these novels (for me anyway) are the Inspector Banks series, by Peter Robinson, if you enjoy those, Grace should be right up your street.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dead Tomorrow, 31 Aug 2009
By 
Ted Feit (Long Beach, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dead Tomorrow (Hardcover)
The sixth book in the Detective Superintendent Roy Grace series finds him, several months after the events which took place in the prior novel, "Dead Man's Footsteps," promoted to head up the Major Crime squad. His nemesis, Assistant Chief Constable Alison Vosper, has been promoted and moved to another part of the country, making his job a bit easier and less stressful. He is presently trying to impress her successor, but finds that effort quite difficult by virtue of the new case he and his squad are working on: Three dead bodies have been found in the English Channel, all their major internal organs quite expertly excised. The ensuing investigation, run along various lines, brings into play a timely issue: the international trafficking of not only humans, but human organs. The author puts a very human face on the tale, introducing Caitlin Beckett, a teenager living for the past six years with serious liver disease, becoming more serious by the day, with her mother desperately willing to do anything necessary to save her life.

On a more personal note, Grace, approaching forty years of age, is finally able to move on, romantically, after his wife's utter disappearance nearly ten years prior, and is hoping to make his relationship with Cleo, the area's chief mortician, more permanent. The cops in this novel, as usual with this author, are truly dedicated, altruistic men and women. Still present, among other cops we have grown to know and love, is Glenn Branson, whose unhappy marital situation has him still in residence in Grace's living quarters.

Parenthetically, I greatly enjoyed seeing Jeffery Deaver make a brief appearance as a drug dealer, albeit a dead one, as well as an homage to Val McDermid as the author of a novel [one which I myself had greatly enjoyed] being read by one of the book's characters. Among my other favorite things about the book was the author invoking two oracles I have loved in detective fiction for years, to wit: one Mr. Conan Doyle, who famously said, "when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth," and the other Occam's Razor, of the true origins of which I was previously unaware - leave it to Mr. James to enlighten me about this as in so many other things! As Mr. James tells it: "Occam was a fourteenth-century philosopher monk who used the analogy of taking a razor-sharp knife and to cut away everything but the most obvious explanation. That, Brother Occam believed, was where the truth usually lay." Both are used to great effect in this case.

The tale is a rather grim one, dealing with a macabre subject, obviously well researched by the author. A hefty book, my one criticism is that it might have benefited from some judicious editing. That said, the novel is recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Massive but compellingly readable fifth Roy Grace novel, 5 Sep 2014
By 
Jl Adcock "John Adcock" (Ashtead UK) - See all my reviews
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At over 650 pages and more than 120 (admittedly short and punchy) chapters, this is quite a chunky fifth instalment in the Roy Grace series. And overall it is a really well-crafted and engaging story, concerned with the world of people-trafficking and organ harvesting. Peter James makes things all too real in this aspect of the book, and has clearly done his homework on the subject, as the lengthy but generous list of acknowledgements at the end of the book confirms.

Across such a big novel, the writing is inevitably a bit uneven. Grace himself comes over convincingly as a character when he's running the police operation in question, but the scenes where he's with new squeeze Cleo makes him look like a emotionally unintelligent teenager, rather than an almost forty-year old copper with a wealth of life experience under his belt. If these aspects of the books were better done, the Roy Grace series would be so much better.

The cast of supporting characters is generally well-done, and although the book heads into the familiar territory of the chase and mad-dash finale that Peter James has thrown into the previous volumes, in Dead Tomorrow it's done with a bit more skill, and some aspects of the ending are genuinely surprising and dramatically poignant.

All in all, a very strong fifth addition to the series. Reviewers of the very latest Roy Grace novels on Amazon tend to suggest that he's lost his way a bit as a character, so maybe this one was approaching the high point of the series? Either way, for such a lengthy book to entertain and engross for most of its length says much about the skill of the writer.

The Kindle version is well-formatted and free of those annoying e-book errors and glitches, so this is another plus point for this particular version of the book. Recommended.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why so long?, 2 April 2010
By 
Geoff Richardson (Reading) - See all my reviews
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Don't get me wrong, I love Peter James. I snap up his novels as soon as they're available, and enjoy them all - even if they can be a bit 'same-y'. At least you know what you're getting.
But this one is much, much longer than all of the others. Great, I thought; more time for plot expansion and enjoyment of the character development. But oh dear, here's the rub - the first 350 pages are an utterly pointless dirge. Nothing happens. The plot crawls along so slowly that it's very difficult to foster any enthusiasm. One might call it 'utterly put-down-able'. I got the feeling he was trying to write a screenplay for a '4 hour TV special' rather than a novel. The ending is sadly predictable, with no twists at all.
Still, I'll read his next one, but please, Peter, try to get back to your roller-coaster best next time...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Romania comes to Brighton, 17 Sep 2013
By 
Jane Baker "jan-bookcase" (Somerset) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dead Tomorrow (Ds Roy Grace 5) (Paperback)
Another gripping story by PJ covering so many topics. I would not normally choose a novel about people-trafficking but this gives plenty of food for thought. If PJ is to be believed in this story it is big business. This is what I admire about this author - his fearlessness in tackling difficult issues and his ability to set both sides through his characters. This book is heart-rending in so many areas - the street children of Romania and the awfulness of their plight; Caitlin who needs a liver transplant and the despair of her mother crossing all boundaries to achieve this at any price. There is some softness here too to counter-balance the horror - Grace is happier than in any novel so far, trying to cast his past demons aside. James is adept in keeping the reader updated on case details when, at briefings, Grace calls upon his team to give a resumee. This is perfect for the reader in picking up details which may have been lost. He pens a brilliant style.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN ERROR but 5 stars anyway, 7 July 2013
By 
Kindlelover (East Sussex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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A tremendous read and a very scary story. How far will people go when there is a desperate medical need to save a loved one? How low can some people stoop in order to get rich on other people's distress? This story is an eye opener. Apparently there are people in the world who are so evil that they see fit to murder other people whom they feel are worthless in order to sell organs for transplant. I don't want to give away any more of the story. It is well worth reading this shocking and emotive book I recommend it.

However I must bring up something I feel is an error. Location 1222-34 in the Kindle version we hear about someone who has been seriously injured in an accident. He is taken to hospital where he has all the usual tests to see if he is brain injured. It turns out in the story line that the accident victim scores badly in the tests.

The problem I have is with this part of the story which I quote:-

"he(the accident victim) was already in the CT unit, having a brain scan. If it had shown a blood clot he would have been transferred to the neurological unit at Hurstwood Park for surgery. But the scan had shown there was a massive internal haemorrhaging, which meant there is nothing surgical that could be done. It was a wait and see situation."

Something similar happened to my husband. A scan at the Eastbourne DGH showed massive haemorrhaging in his brain. Immediate arrangements were made to transfer him to Hurstwood Park (the same neurological unit mentioned in the story) where he was admitted to the surgical ward. Here further tests showed that he had stabilized and after constant monitoring over the next few days it was decided that surgery was not required even though he was still seriously ill however they were ready to operate if his condition worsened. A young man in the next bed was the victim of a severe assault and he also suffered severe internal haemorrhaging, in his case it was decided that surgery was necessary to relieve the pressure on the brain. Thankfully both my husband and the young man survived and went home. The point I am making is that the sentence "there was massive internal haemorrhaging which meant that nothing surgical could be done" in my experience is not true. Over the next few weeks I met some remarkable people who had come through the most horrific brain trauma where surgery had relieved the build up of pressure. For these people "a wait and see situation" was not the answer, surgery was.

At a follow up appointment the surgeon showed me my husband's scan and I was shocked but deeply thankful that he had come through something so dreadful. I guess that this is a matter close to my heart which is why I felt it worth mentioning.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 4 Oct 2011
By 
P. Stephens - See all my reviews
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I've really liked all the Roy Grace novels up to now, but am really disappointed with this one. It's rambling, repetitive and just not up to Peter James' normal standard. Shame.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dead beat after staying up late reading it., 18 Feb 2010
By 
Another cracking read by Peter James. Superbly researched, with lots of moral issues raised that make you have a think about life's values. Another unputdownable book, that doesn't so much as keep you guessing but keeps making you read the next chapter..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My eyes opened ...., 17 Feb 2010
By 
Superbly researched, this book exposes the horrendous trade in body parts for monetary gain and the desperate lives of the street kids of Romania. We hear about such "services" in the media but in Dead Tomorrow those offering them are shown to be devoid of all humanity. Those of us with children can empathise with Lynne in her bid to find a replacement liver for her daughter at all costs when the National Health Service grinds so incomprehensively and slowly. The shortage of organ donors in the UK is highlighted and should prompt every reader to carry a donor card. This would be such a positive legacy of Dead Tomorrow. The Police underwater search unit is well portrayed with some new characters but Roy Grace's "team" engages us as ever - Glenn's continuing marital problems and Norman's un-PC behaviour being developed. Roy's own personal happiness with Cleo shines through but the spectre of Sandy still floats over the story. More great Brighton and Hove locations too. As ever, the various "strands" of story cleverly weave ever closer till the last page is reached. Another unputdownable book from Peter James.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great crime thriller, 16 Feb 2010
By 
J. Ingram - See all my reviews
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For all fans of crime fiction, I would recommend this book and this author. Something happening on every page, lots of different characters involved but easy to follow. A real page turner. I have already read one other Roy Grace story (Looking Good Dead)which prompted me to read this one and I wasn't disappointed. I look forward to reading more of this series.
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Dead Tomorrow (Ds Roy Grace 5)
Dead Tomorrow (Ds Roy Grace 5) by Peter James (Paperback - 7 Oct 2011)
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