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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Impressive YA debut from one of the modern masters of adult fantasy
Un Lun Dun is the fifth novel by British fantasy author China Mieville. Mieville has become the guiding light of the 'New Weird' fantasy movement which has become a major force in the genre in the last few years, and in his Bas-Lag novels he's created a compellingly different secondary world mixing elements of fantasy and steampunk to good effect. However, in this latest...
Published on 8 Jun 2007 by A. Whitehead

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3.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for us.
The book was perfect. My son has to read it at highschool. It arrived no the date You told us.
Published 12 months ago by Cristina Zozaya


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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Subversive, original and very entertaining, 3 May 2008
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This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Paperback)
China Mieville's brilliant YA fantasy subverts the traditional genre elements, notably the ideas that only a person ordained by prophecy can defeat a Big Bad, fantastical worlds only accessible through special portals and that pretty blonde girls have to be the hero.

When Zanna and Deeba realise that a broken umbrella is watching Zanna one night, they follow it and find themselves in the parallel world of UnLondon. There they discover that Zanna is the Shwazzy, the only person able to defeat the Smog, a cloud of noxious gas intent on dominating and destroying both UnLondon and London. But just as Zanna's embraces the role she's unexpectedly incapacitated. Someone has to help UnLondon if it is to survive, and Deeba volunteers. But she's not the Shwazzy, so what good can she possibly do?

Mieville's imagination blew me away. His UnLondon is familiar to Londoners (double-decker buses, markets, even a version of the London Eye) but he mixes it with the surreal - cannibal giraffes and houses constructed from rubbish amongst others. He uses puns to great effect and I'd recommend this book for the binjas alone. Politics also plays a big part in the book, with London's government being tied to what's happening in UnLondon. There's a distinctly anti-authoritarian feel to the text with the motivation of political leaders and even the book of prophecy all being questioned and found wanting.

Mieville illustrates his own text and the drawings are evocative and help flesh out his world. Deeba's a very human heroine, brave because she needs to be and prone to self-doubt and I particularly liked the scene where she refuses to jump through the normal prophecy hoops. Her helpers are well written, particularly Hemi the half-ghost boy who sees shoplifting as extreme shopping, Jones the bus conductor and I loved Curdle the milk carton. My only quibble is that where Mieville kills members of her team, those members haven't quite been in the book long enough for it to have a big emotional impact.

The slow build-up might put off some readers, but the chapters are kept short and there are some wonderfully written scenes (my favourite being one with a Black Window spider, which is very creepy). Mieville leaves an opening for a sequel and I would love to see more of the world he's created. Teens reading this will want to read more of his work.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars aborable, endearing, and has characters you will remember and care about, 30 Nov 2011
This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Paperback)
One day, Zanna and Deeba somehow end up in Un Lun Dun, which is much like London only entirely not. They find out that Zanna is the chosen one, and she must destroy the smog...only Zanna doesn't want to so they hand over to the citizens of Un Lun Dun, go home and Zanna's memories are taken. But something doesn't make sense and Deeba can't stop thinking about what's happening in Un Lun Dun.

I found this book wonderfully vivid and imaginative, a great read and it would no doubt make a great movie as it has a good number of visual elements that would work well like that. The opening is a little dull and predictable, we have all the traditional fantasy setup of the chosen one, the evil one who needs defeating, the sidekick, the mentors...and then it all goes to pot and it gets interesting.

Deeba is a wonderful, likeable character who grows a lot during the novel and really comes to find herself. The backdrop for the story is wonderful and imaginative, it made me want to explore Un Lun Dun. I was expecting kind of a city below like Neverwhere but Un Lun Dun is a city beside, I suppose. Kind of like an alternate dimension where it's kind of like London but at the same time very much not. As it's primarily a young adult book the villain is a little flat sometimes, though to it's credit it has reasons for doing what it does beyond "Muwhahaha I'm evil" which is as far as some fantasy gets. The side characters and charming and memorable, like Curdle the milk carton and Bling and Couldron the words. I got to relaly care about a whole host of them and that's another good thing about the book, it isn't afriad to make you feel things.

Deeba as a character is endearing not only in that she's positioned from the outset at the underdog, Zanna's sidekick, but in that she's adorably teenaged. She uses slang like bling and innit and at times just talks like a teenager and wants the things that teenagers want.

So, yeah. The book is aborable, endearing, and has characters you will remember and care about. The world is vivid and interesting. My only big annoyance was I worked out the end reveal about two chapters too early and ended up having to skim read those two chapters, thuogh the fact that once I'd worked it out it made me actually nervous and so full of energy and concern I had to skim read ahead to make sure Deeba worked it out and it was of is a testement to the book. Also, given it's a young adult book my getting the point early isn't unexpected...but yeah. IT's good. Go read it now.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish, 18 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Kindle Edition)
I really tried with this book, but its one of the few books I've ever abandoned. The premise of the book - an alternative hidden London- is fine, but it's just such a turgid uninspiring read, with cardboard 'working class' heros. Sorry.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for us., 15 Nov 2013
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The book was perfect. My son has to read it at highschool. It arrived no the date You told us.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't get into this steampunky spectacular, 17 July 2013
By 
lewiscarrollnut (london, - United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Kindle Edition)
This book started out fairly promisingly but the plot soon fizzled out to be swamped by surreal imagery and an unrealistic alternative London. Some of China Mieville's ideas are startlingly imaginative, but they all seemed a bit pointless. I persevered till about half way through and then abandoned it - I couldn't get interested in what happened next. A fanciful, stylised Steampunk sort of book, it stimulates the imagination and it will I am sure sell well among his many followers, but it's just not my style.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Neverwhere for the new century, 29 Aug 2012
This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Paperback)
I was nervous that this would be Mieville-lite, sanitised and twee for the children. I needn't have worried - it has the same edge as his adult work, but at the same time is at a level where I wouldn't be nervous about a young teenager picking it up. The novel draws on the essence of London, much in the way that Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere did, but with a very different flavour and texture. It also avoids the usual traps that come from a prophetic statement about what the future holds. Strongly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Must read YA, 29 Feb 2012
This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Paperback)
Back in 2010 I read my first and thus far only Miéville. I'd only become aware of his writing due to starting to read book blogs, but everyone was highly complementary, so I knew I needed to read some of his work. However, I was also a little intimidated, because Miéville's work was described as very smart and layered and here I was thinking: "What if I don't get it?" Luckily, I did get The City & The City - I think - so I really wanted to read more of his work. And in August last year I got really lucky and won a copy of his book Un Lun Dun in a giveaway on Mel's Random Reviews. It still took me a while to get to it, but once I did I was again swept away by Miéville's fantastic writing and his imaginative creations. In a word, Un Lun Dun was amazing!

Un Lun Dun is a YA book and as such perhaps far more accessible than say Miéville's Embassytown (which, for the record, I haven't read) and I totally adored this book and his UnLondon. The book was just so much fun. UnLondon is a wonderful creation, which has some clear echo's of the London we know and love, but also is a place totally its own. The Ghosts have their own Quarter and are peopled with those who can't move on, but also don't have a place in the world above any more. This wonderful world of moily houses and discarded appliances which pop up randomly in the street is populated by some amazing creatures, such as binja's, the Black Windows, Unbrella's and the rebrella's. They are not just described in a wonderful fashion, they are also included as illustrations drawn by Miéville himself, which makes them even more fun.

Un Lun Dun is not just an example of great, imaginative world building, but also of fantastic playing with language. Miéville plays with words in so many ways, whether it is by punning, by creating onomatopoeic representations of regular words, such as The Schwazzy and the klinneract, or by creating words or names with double meanings, such as Brokkenbroll, the master of the Unbrella's or the broken brollies. It was a joy to try and identify these words and every time I got one I felt full of triumph, though this task might be easier for native speakers!

The fact that Deeba was the UnChosen, which of course makes far more sense for UNLondon, is not just a word joke - which I really liked - but also part of a larger phenomenon in Un Lun Dun--the subverting of traditional tropes. I loved how Miéville played with the tropes of the genre, sometimes seemingly following them and at others just turning them on their head. For example, the prophecy, which turns out to be incorrect and the quest for the UnGun, setting us up for a classic 'following the predetermined path to gain the needed McGuffin in seven easy steps' which Deeba decides to cut short pretty brutally. Un Lun Dun is also pretty scary and Miéville doesn't keep back from killing off characters, the loss of some of which left me a little teary.

You can see where Miéville draws inspiration from Gaiman - something which the author acknowledges in his afterword - and it wouldn't have helped that I read Neverwhere in the days prior to starting Un Lun Dun. But even though the influence is clear, Un Lun Dun is its own story and completely Miéville. Un Lun Dun is a fantastic story, which while it's classed YA, is also suitable to the more mature MG reader, however parents might want to check beforehand whether they think their child is ready for the book. In any case Un Lun Dun is not just must read Miéville, but also must read YA fantasy.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic 'other' world tale., 1 Mar 2007
By 
kehs (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Hardcover)
Deeba and Zanna discover a wheel in a basement, Zenna turns it and realizes that something weird is happening - London is being switched off! Zanna and Deeba are two best friends and they find themselves in the world of UnLondon, a place where London's discarded things somehow end up. UnLondon is under siege by the sinister Smog (a poisonous cloud) and is waiting for its saviour to arrive as prophesised by their magic book that can speak. Guided by this book the girls have to try and put an end to the poisonous cloud. A crew of UnLondon locals, the likes of which you will have never dreamed, joins them in their quest! UnLondon is more than a little unusual but an absolute wonder to read about.

If you love Neil Gaiman (especially Neverwhere), Terry Pratchett and Lewis Carroll then this book will be a particular delight for you.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's not me old China..., 17 July 2009
By 
G. Timmins "Brandon Tryle" (London, GB) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Hardcover)
The dark surrealism of Gene Wolfe, the cheeky flippancy of Jack Vance and the clever wordplay of Piers Anthony combine here with a myriad other influences into an overly lengthy but creditably original work.

Miéville proves not to be a natural writer of young adult fiction. I felt distinctly at times that Miéville's first drafts had been written in the wonderful style of 'Perdido Street Station' and only subsequently simplified to make the story more accessible to younger readers. This impression of reconstruction together with an uneven pace and some dodgy dialogue made it a sometimes difficult read.

That said, I'm glad I read it. Much of the imagery (assisted by the author's own pencil illustrations) and humour are memorable and I reckon people between 11 and 16 would find the mix of horror, adventure and other-worldliness highly enjoyable. It's just that, as an adult, I think I'll be much happier when I pick up my third Miéville novel - 'The Scar'.
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2.0 out of 5 stars I love Cina Mielville, 10 Nov 2014
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This review is from: Un Lun Dun (Kindle Edition)
This a kids book. Nowhere on the reviews did it tell you that. I love Cina Mielville, and I've no doubt this is a great kids book. But I really do wish the descriptions made it clear what age readers this is aimed at.
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Un Lun Dun
Un Lun Dun by China Mieville (Paperback - 6 May 2011)
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