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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent finale to the series
Jupiter War, Neal Asher, Tor, 2013, 471pp.

This is an excellent finale to the `Owner' series by this author, and continues directly on from the end of the previous novel, Zero Point (Owner Trilogy 2). It is an excellently constructed novel, as Argus Station moves from Mars, to the far side of the Sun (from Earth), to the Asteroid Belt, and to the moons of...
Published 7 months ago by Mr. Mice Guy

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not his greatest
I loved the first book but i find i'm reading this just to get to the end not so thrilling.
However neal asher does inject many points to ponder on the state of the human race politic and other thought provoking ideas.
Published 8 months ago by A. Peach


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent finale to the series, 24 Dec 2013
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
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Jupiter War, Neal Asher, Tor, 2013, 471pp.

This is an excellent finale to the `Owner' series by this author, and continues directly on from the end of the previous novel, Zero Point (Owner Trilogy 2). It is an excellently constructed novel, as Argus Station moves from Mars, to the far side of the Sun (from Earth), to the Asteroid Belt, and to the moons of Jupiter; while the Scourge returns to Earth, and Earth builds up its defences and a squadron of attack ships, and mutinies are plotted on Argus and aboard Earth's space dock, culminating with the twin climaxes of a space battle in Jupiter orbit and the mutiny on, and attack of the Scourge against, the space dock - which has Selene Galahad aboard. The story moves with clockwork precision, as vast distances and long periods of time have to be carefully choreographed to ensure that everyone is where they need to be at the appropriate time, while also maintaining the interpersonal relationships and character development of the large cast. Everyone and everything fits together like clockwork, as you would expect from the master-craftsman that is Neal Asher. Oh, and there is plenty of death and destruction on an epic scale, also as you would expect from Mr Asher.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not a bad ending to the trilogy, 22 July 2014
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A good ending, maybe a little to tidy but good all the same.
In some ways it reminded me of one of the older sci-fi novels, with hints of EE Doc Smith stories of ever increasing power on both sides.

Will there be a follow on set of books? I think so, and am looking forward to seeing where the journey leads.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not his greatest, 7 Nov 2013
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A. Peach "Pilgrim" (UK) - See all my reviews
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I loved the first book but i find i'm reading this just to get to the end not so thrilling.
However neal asher does inject many points to ponder on the state of the human race politic and other thought provoking ideas.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 12 July 2014
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This review is from: Jupiter War: The Owner series: Book Three (Owner Trilogy 3) (Paperback)
great series
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4.0 out of 5 stars great hard scifi, 10 July 2014
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If you want a wonderful suspense story allied to really good technology then this is for you. There are some really clever uses of current "real" science with what might happen in the not too distant future. I have not read a great deal of Mr Asher but I hope to read most of his stuff.

His characterisation of some of the people involved is a little contrived and his balancing of the human side if a
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 1 July 2014
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This id the third book in an excellent series. Great read, that I could not put down. I am sad the seies is over.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Total Sci Fi - end of the world, nasty diseases and alien minds - great!, 16 April 2014
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Typical Asher, action and edge of seat survival stuff all the way. A continuation of the 2 books so not so stand alone as the Polity series of books but still very enjoyable and continued in The Engineer ReConditioned
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4.0 out of 5 stars A satisfying conclusion, 22 Mar 2014
By 
M. Brookes - See all my reviews
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I've been a fan of Neal Asher's writing for a while now, the Polity novels were all excellent reads. This latest Owner series took a little while for me to get into as they had a different feel to them, less immediate and visceral than his earlier novels. Once I got into them though I was hooked and that remains the case with this latest and final book in the trilogy - although the ending leaves the storyline open for more books and I hope that will be the case.

For me the great thing about science-fiction is when it tackles big question, at the core of Jupiter War (and the preceeding novels) is trans-humanism, or more specifically the consequences of melding humans with technology. Alan Saul is an interesting character as he balances his once human self with the practicalities of being an AI and integrated not only with his ship but the robots within. We also see the beginnings of others taking similar steps, although I would have liked to have seen a bit more done with these characters, especially the comlife operatives.

This is all set against a dystopian background where the leader of Earth considers humanity a pestilence upon the Earth and uses extreme measures to restore nature to a dying Earth. Despite the advanced technology life for most is a dismal affair and this contrasts with the microcosm of humanity on Saul's ship.

Space battles are also a fun part of many science fiction tales and here we have not only an entertaining battle, but also a well thought out one. The considerations in the engagement provided a few interesting insights, not only for the technology involved but the tactics needed to utilise them.

What we have here is a damn fine science fiction read, it's fast paced and provides a satisfactory conclusion to the trilogy. Although as I said at the beginning the ending did leave me wanting more and I hope that will be the case.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great finish to this trilogy, 20 Feb 2014
By 
Mark Chitty (North Wales) - See all my reviews
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Jupiter War is the third novel in Asher’s Owner series, following on from The Departure and Zero Point. While the series took a while to really find its feet in The Departure, Zero Point managed to continue the story to great effect while adding some rather interesting concepts to the mix. Jupiter War takes all that has gone before and brings us to the end-game of the Owner’s beginnings, taking all aspects laid down in the previous volumes to deliver a satisfying and entertaining conclusion.

As with Zero Point, Asher doesn’t hang around in getting us into the action, with Jupiter War jumping straight into the meat of the story. Alan Saul, the Owner, is on Mars to rescue his sister, Var Delex, and while there he plans on utilising the Antares base to his own ends: turning Argus from asteroid station to interstellar spaceship. On Earth Serene Gallahad is dictator, implementing her justice as and when she sees fit, taking no prisoners in the process. But she still doesn’t possess the gene bank needed to kick start the biosphere into life again, with her dream of rebuilding the planet reliant on getting her hands on it. With events unfolding on Argus and Earth, and both parties focused on what they must do to meet their goals, it is only a matter of time before the final deciding battle takes place.

What works in Jupiter War is the way Asher has pulled together all elements from the previous novels into a coherent whole, answering questions that are raised and continuing the character development nicely and without any unwarranted changes. Saul continues on the path to godhood, combining ever more with technology and moving away from his human side. This is particularly evident in his dealings with those on board Argus, even with his sister, Var. Galahad is truly the villain, and is everything you could ask for in a character. Her conviction that she’s doing what is right for the planet doesn’t waiver, but her confidence and arrogance push her to megalomania. She’s fascinating to read, perhaps more so than the Owner, and seeing her in action often brings a smile even when that’s not the intention. Of course, with two personalities such as these present in the story there is bound to be conflict, and when it comes the outcome never seems to be certain, despite everything we know.

Asher also has a way with technology, as anyone that has read his Polity novels may know. Jupiter War is no different, with the Owner implementing memory back-ups and clone bodies, effectively offering immortality to the humans on Argus, but it’s his advancements in robotics that take the centre stage here. After the introduction of the AI Proctors in Zero Point, as well as the interstellar Rhine Drive, there is a solid foundation ready for the imminent conflict, and with the creation of legions of robots to engineer and build the spaceship, the pieces are slowly moved into place. Asher uses the Owner’s ever-evolving status to show just how efficient this aspect can become, and just how frightening the prospect could really be.

Ultimately, Jupiter War is successful in everything it set out to do. The story is, more or less, good versus bad, though the grey areas start to trickle in more than in the previous novels. He raises many questions about what it is to be human, and just how far down the path of becoming one with machines is possible while still keeping that fundamental humanity. It’s a question that is not entirely answered, but it opens up plenty of room for any (potential) future volumes to investigate.

If you like your sci-fi packed with believable – and often scary – scenarios of the path humanity could walk down, and looking at more than just the surface implications of such a path, all the while jam-packed with action, invention, and just downright, in-your-face, balls-to-the-wall action, then Jupiter War will more than satisfy you. But do yourself a favour: start at the beginning and enjoy the ride that Asher takes you on.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent novel from Mr Asher, 15 Feb 2014
By 
Mark Flint (Cambridgeshire) - See all my reviews
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Continues to create wonderfully dark imaginative characters, the depth of the books
plot is a joy to discover. More please.
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Jupiter War: The Owner series: Book Three (Owner Trilogy 3)
Jupiter War: The Owner series: Book Three (Owner Trilogy 3) by Neal Asher (Paperback - 10 April 2014)
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