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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Guilty Secret.... I liked this...
I'm quite surprised to say that... I really enjoyed this story. When I selected it, it was really so I could read something that my wife might enjoy as well as myself... however, I could not put it down, I had to read it right until the conclusion.

The story begins rather slowly, it builds layers and fully flushes out each character. It loads the story with...
Published on 26 Jun 2011 by J. Bond

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly disappointed!
"The End of Everything" has a fairly straightforward plot - the probable abduction of thirteen year old Evie Verver and the effects this has upon her family and especially, her best friend, Lizzie. However, this simple plot-line is the vehicle for the exploration of some complex ideas: the awakening sexuality of young girls and their attraction for older men; sibling...
Published on 27 Jun 2012 by A. E. Thomas


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Guilty Secret.... I liked this..., 26 Jun 2011
By 
J. Bond "Xelous" (Nottingham, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
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I'm quite surprised to say that... I really enjoyed this story. When I selected it, it was really so I could read something that my wife might enjoy as well as myself... however, I could not put it down, I had to read it right until the conclusion.

The story begins rather slowly, it builds layers and fully flushes out each character. It loads the story with weight and suspense, which if you don't have a little patience you'll not enjoy, but then in the resolution of the story the flood gates open, the plot unfolds at a real explosive pace.

Some of the language employed is strong, some of the language may, for the moderate middle England reader maybe too strong. But on the whole the story is told, and is about a delicate subject (child abuse at its core).

I read the story in the evening, in bed and it left me unable to stop turning pages.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly disappointed!, 27 Jun 2012
By 
A. E. Thomas (Beds) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
"The End of Everything" has a fairly straightforward plot - the probable abduction of thirteen year old Evie Verver and the effects this has upon her family and especially, her best friend, Lizzie. However, this simple plot-line is the vehicle for the exploration of some complex ideas: the awakening sexuality of young girls and their attraction for older men; sibling rivalry; father/daughter relationships; obsession.
Although the ingredients for an absorbing read were all there, I found this novel to be irritating. I caught myself wishing that the author would "get on with it", as she described Lizzie's thoughts yet again. I also felt that Lizzie's inner voice was not that of a thirteen year old, but an older person describing these thoughts - a minor detail, maybe, but one that grated.
On the whole, for me, this was a disappointing read.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Uncomfortable but engrossing, 22 Jun 2011
By 
FictionFan (Kirkintilloch, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
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Written in the first person, we see the story unfold through the eyes of 13-year-old Lizzie. Evie and Lizzie have been friends for ever in that close, intimate way that only happens in childhood where every secret and emotion is shared. Now, however, Evie has disappeared and Lizzie is trying to make sense of her feelings of loss, her suspicions that Evie may have been hiding something and her relationships with Evie's family who have been her second family for so long.

This book is an examination of that difficult time when childhood and adolescence meet. Lizzie is experiencing her first feelings of sexual desire and is trying to understand and deal with this. Being 13 is a long time ago for me now, but Lizzie took me back to that turmoil of emotions, that clash of innocence and knowingness, that combined sense of anticipation and apprehension of a new phase of life, and it seemed to me that the author had caught this incredibly accurately. Through Lizzie, she talks about the physical changes, the private fantasies, the struggle to understand the motivations of adults and to be accepted by them in a new way, the secrets and stresses within families.

The book is tautly written and relatively short at around 250 pages. I found it an uncomfortable but engrossing read, covering aspects of pubescent sexuality that we sometimes like to pretend don't exist. Suspenseful to the end and with a pervading atmosphere of dread, I shared with Lizzie a need not just to know what had happened to Evie, but to understand. This is not a book I will soon forget - I highly recommend it to anyone who was once a 13-year-old girl, though I'd love to see some male reviews too.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seriously impressed, 29 Jun 2011
By 
Sally Zigmond (Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
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Lizzie and Evie are best friends. Both are on the cusp of adulthood. They are always together. They share everything: their hopes, fears, bodily changes, school work and even their clothes. Closeness doesn't come into it.

But when one hot summer's day, Evie goes missing everything Lizzie thought she knew is destroyed. She thinks she knows what has happened and in some ways she is right but her idea of truth is neither what others see nor is it the real truth. Truth is a complex commodity. In fact, Lizzie sees everything in every detail but she is nave and confused in her own feelings to understand what it is she sees.

I have read many stories about the dark undercurrents of Middle America and of young girls coming of age but never one that is so subtly clever without calling attention to its cleverness. I do think, however, it's a mistake to liken it to The Lovely Bones because this is a far, far better novel. It lacks its gaucheness, its sensationalism or gruesomeness. Yes, gruesome things happen but what is most frightening are the small things such as Mr Verver's hand hovering above Dusty's stomach in the moonlight. Now that's scary.

This is an impressive novel, so light in its touch, so sure of its effects. This is the first novel I have read by Megan Abbott but it certainly won't be the last.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Really the end of everything?, 14 Dec 2011
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
I have to agree with points raised by other reviews. Overall I found this to be readable, it did have a storyline and a certain level of mystery to it which kept me interested, however I also agree the whole subject matter was uncomfortable, slightly disturbing and far too complex to be written from the mindset of a 13 year old girl. It was a bit slow at times and perhaps tried a bit too hard but it was a different subject matter so for that reason I gave it three stars and not two. Perhaps the title was a little too dramatic because everything seemed to go back to normal afterwards!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dark and Disturbing !, 17 Jun 2012
This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
To be honest, I picked this up as it was a previous Richard and Judy Book club choice. I've not been disappointed with their selections in the past , but I was with this one. Thankfully, the book is only 246 pages long so a relatively quick read but to be honest I did have to make myself pick it up and finish it. I was intrigued about what had happened to Evie , not a pleasant outcome but on the whole,there are some very strange relationships going on in this book ! Not a particularly comfortable read !!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars over hyped, 7 Oct 2011
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
the story promised a lot but just did not deliver.the writing style i felt was to disjointed and over elaborate.the story was an interesting one in parts but just wasn,t my style i suppose.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unsettling and edgy, 22 Aug 2011
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
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Plenty of reviews here have outlined the plot of this book so I won't repeat that. I found this an uneasy, edgy book where troubling things hover just beneath the surface but don't quite come into full view. As adults we might guess the `truth' before Lizzie, but that just adds to the power of the story and I found myself hoping quite desperately that I would be proved wrong.

Abbott writes really well, and there's an almost fevered deliriousness to her prose at times, as dreams and desires turn into the stuff of nightmares.

There have been quite a few recent books focusing on female adolescence (e.g. What They Do in the Dark, Cold Light, This Perfect World, Island of Lost Girls) but this doesn't feel repetitive or done-before in any way. Abbott conveys excellently the intensity and vulnerability of thirteen year old girls caught in that liminal stage where they're no longer children but certainly aren't adults, whatever they might sometimes think.

There are some niggling points: the over-reliance, in my view, on recounting Lizzie's dreams with their Freudian subtexts, for example. But overall this is a deceptively disturbing book which relies on sideways glances rather than full-blown sensationalism to make its impact. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars couldn't put it down, 22 July 2011
By 
J. S. Matthews (Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
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I thoroughly enjoyed the writing, really beautifully poetic at times. I found the story to be well rounded and satisfyingly ambiguous at times, leaving space for me to question myself about the issues raised. Quite an emotional roller-coaster, and certainly challenging, this is a book I would heartily recommend, though not for the feint hearted perhaps.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting writing style..., 10 Sep 2011
By 
LittleReader (Leeds, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The End of Everything (Paperback)
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Though I found the. jolting. narrative. difficult. at. first. I did soon get used to it and began to enjoy this pseudo-thriller.
Lizzie and Evie, two 13 year olds, have been best friends forever. Living next door to one another, it soon becomes clear that Lizzie envies her friends family, especially her dad who she harbours a secret crush on, so when Evie goes missing, aside from trying to work through her feelings and distress, Lizzie sees an opportunity to please Evie's dad and sets out to find whodunnit. That sounds cynical and actually it's not; Lizzie genuinely wants her friend back but I think she finds herself unprepared for what Dusty, Evie's sister, is keeping from her.
What lets this novel down for me is that, written in the first person, a 13 year old Lizzie feels far too mature in her thought processes and though she makes clumsy mistakes as she sets about her detective work, essentially she thinks as a grown up. I find author's often get this wrong but when they do get it right, it's often briliant, and that is why I couldnt afford 'The end of everything' any greater than 3 *'s.
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The End of Everything
The End of Everything by Megan Abbott (Paperback - 19 Aug 2011)
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