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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling.
A compelling, gritty debut mystery set in the frozen tundra of the arctic, on Canada's far northern Ellesmere Island, close to Greenland. I found the descriptions of the rapidly changing, harsh, beautiful location and of the way of life of the rugged, troubled residents to be fascinating; the murder mystery was pretty good. 3.5 stars overall. I've read that the British...
Published 17 months ago by finalguy

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good sense of location...
Set in the icy wastes of a small Inuit community in the High Arctic on Ellsemere Island and the fictional Craig Island this is a tale of the harsh realities of survival and murder. The story centres on a community facing the common woes of an indigenous people subjected to their dependence on a larger sovereign state, in this case, Canada, and highlights the social...
Published 21 months ago by Raven


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling., 8 Feb 2013
By 
finalguy (Newport (Wales)) - See all my reviews
A compelling, gritty debut mystery set in the frozen tundra of the arctic, on Canada's far northern Ellesmere Island, close to Greenland. I found the descriptions of the rapidly changing, harsh, beautiful location and of the way of life of the rugged, troubled residents to be fascinating; the murder mystery was pretty good. 3.5 stars overall. I've read that the British author, who has previously written nonfiction, is at work on a second mystery featuring the appealing main character, Edie. I anticipate it will be even better.

Half-Inuit Arctic guide and hunter Edie Kiglatuk is leading a routine hunting trek with two qalunaat, or whites, when one is shot while she is off making tea for the group. Edie's beloved stepson Joe, in training to be a nurse, comes by snowmobile to help since a blizzard grounds the available planes, but the man dies anyway. Despite their doubts, Edie and Joe acquiesce to the Tribal Council's decision that the death was self-inflicted, a hunting accident. The Council doesn't want one of the only profitable sources of income on the Island, the guiding, to be impacted by suspicious death investigations.

Edie decides not to rock the boat, since gaining the patriarchal Council's approval to be a guide was difficult enough despite her enormous skill as a hunter and guide, and she needs the part time guiding jobs to pay for Joe's schooling. But Joe is more doubtful, and when another guiding trip goes wrong, more deaths prompts the fierce and independent Edie to start investigating with the reluctant help of Inuit police sergeant Derek Palliser, who would much rather be researching lemmings. The numerous threads of the plot feature culture clashes between Inuit and whites, past injustices, energy corporations' interests in exploring the Arctic, drug use and the high suicide rate on the Island, Greenland, NASA's presence on the island, and more. Edie and Derek are very believable and sympathetic characters, despite their various personal failings, and their love of their arctic landscape is contagious.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Artic Adventure, 8 Dec 2012
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Loved this book, couldn't put it down. The characters are flawed and human and very well crafted and believable. I know some people have said that they felt that some of the characters weren't rounded out enough, but I liked that, not everyone you meet in life is that well known to you, so for me, that made it all the more believable, I didn't particularly want to know more about everyone.
I enjoyed the careful crafting of the details of life in the Artic, of the food, the native ways, transport etc. The gradually revealed relationships, also very accurately seen, I felt, were also more representative of real life encounters. All in all, a thrilling read and I look forward to reading 'The Boy in the Snow'.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A riveting thriller, 25 Mar 2011
This review is from: White Heat (Hardcover)
A riveting thriller with many twists and turns, that takes us on a journey into the unknown. And Edie, the detective, is a great character.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing and mesmeric, 27 Mar 2011
This review is from: White Heat (Hardcover)
Set in the frozen wastes of the Canadian Arctic, White Heat is an absorbing crime thriller with an original and memorable central character, Edie, a diminutive Inuit woman with a mind of her own. McGrath evokes the location with such acuity that you actually feel the cold while you're reading. An excellent book and a fascinating insight into an unknown world with a plot that keeps you engrossed right until its beautifully executed end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great absorbing read, 6 Nov 2012
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Really enjoyed this slightly unusual read. It was great to get a flavour of the Canadian artic areas and the people that lived there. It has put me in the mood for more by the same author.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The hunt for the truth, 25 July 2012
By 
Richard Latham (Burton on Trent) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: White Heat (The Edie Kiglatuk Arctic Crime Series) (Paperback)
This is a terrific book set on Ellesmere Island deep in the Arctic Circle just across the water/ice from Greenland. It's central character is Edie Kiglatuk a hunter / guide based in a small community where the modern world is trying to get a foothold but traditional values; customs, language and beliefs are just about holding their own. Edie turns detective when her personal world is turned upside down by the killing of a hunter. The harshness of the environment is brought home and adds to the tension of story. Edie needs all her skills to prevail and sets about tracking down the killers as the evidence is gathered. A rich sense of place is found in these pages; it is cold, dramatic and unyielding but for Edie it is their home and it is a joy to share it briefly. The real benefit is to share this story from a native perspective, the thrills & chills without fear of frostbite from your easy chair. The life of the Inuit peoples isn't made touristy or over sentimentalized but it is clearly written from a position of knowledge and respect. It touches some of the issues seen in The Day is Dark by Yrsa Siguršardóttir but gives a much better sense of place and isolation. More of a novel than a typical crime book; however it has a credible plot and a satisfactory conclusion with the usual twists and turns associated with that genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and exciting in parts, 22 Jun 2012
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This review is from: White Heat (Hardcover)
This story starts off fast but then slows down whilst we get to know the characters in depth and their relationships. There's a small problem with this. The most sympathetic character is killed off quite early on and the other characters all want to be somewhere else, doing something else and escape into alcohol, drugs or some other haven. I am glad I persevered, however, because the story picks up again about midway through and the rest of the story is pacy and imaginative. Other reviewers have pointed out that you can feel the cold whilst reading and this is true. The descriptions of the snow, weather and local food and drink are detailed. There is a lot conveyed about the Inuit culture in this book. By the end of the book, the main character, Edie, and the policeman, Derek, had become more rounded, grounded and sympathetic. I might read another story about Edie and Derek if there is one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book deserves a prize!, 28 May 2012
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This review is from: White Heat (The Edie Kiglatuk Arctic Crime Series) (Paperback)
I fell in love with the main character on page one and could not put this book down. A very engaging story, packed with interesting facts about life in the Artic. Really enjoyed this book and can't wait for the next one!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An assured debut, 6 May 2012
By 
Rob Kitchin - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: White Heat (Hardcover)
As debut crime novels goes, White Heat couldn't be much better. It has everything a good crime novel should have: strong plot, excellent characterization, vivid sense of place, a dollop full of history, culture and social politics, and a swirl of conspiracy. The book doesn't simply describe the world of Edie Kiglatuk - the small, tight knit community and the icy, harsh landscape - but places the reader into it. Edie is a wonderful creation - a headstrong woman who rails against custom and tradition at the same time as she tries to maintain them in the face of encroachment by the `white world'. The other characters, with their various traits and foibles, are also well penned. The plot is engaging and unfolds at a nice pace and manages to remain coherent to the end without falling apart or being overly reliant on coincidence. Where the book really shone was in the portrayal of the Inuit life and the rendering of the icy, harsh but beautiful landscape. Not only was I thoroughly entertained but I learned a fair bit about the realities and social politics of Arctic living. I've already recommended the book to friends and I'm hoping that there are more Edie stories in the pipeline.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping thriller, 7 Sep 2011
This review is from: White Heat (Hardcover)
White Heat introduces a wonderful new heroine. Addicted, tenacious and the perfect outsider Edie battles gruesome odds to track down her prey. Along the way we meet with a cast of memorable characters including a lemur obsessed sheriff trying to forget his zsa zsa gabor like ex.
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White Heat (The Edie Kiglatuk Arctic Crime Series)
White Heat (The Edie Kiglatuk Arctic Crime Series) by M. J. McGrath (Paperback - 16 Feb 2012)
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