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75 Reviews
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Losing grip on reality
Anyone who has read and enjoyed the sublime Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy and The Restaurant at the End of the Universe is sure to welcome the third book of the series with open arms. At the same time however, they may quite rightly be concerned as to whether the high standard of the earlier books can be matched by Adams' third effort. If at all possible, 'Life, the...
Published on 17 Jun 2004 by Victoria Craven

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Little Too Different for My Liking
I liked this book, as the comedy was good(like in the other books in the 'trilogy'). However, I felt a bit disorientated. The style is quite different from the previous books. It is altogether more serious, dealing with love, which, when involved with Arthur Dent, is slightly unsettling(especially the scene with the flying; you'll now what I mean when you read it...
Published on 21 Feb 2000


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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quite different to the other Hitchhiker guides, 10 Dec 2003
By 
Darren Simons (Middlesex, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This book follows on from the Hitchhiker trilogy telling us more about Arthur Dent, its main character who's spent endless years travelling between planets with the Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy his only guide. This time much of the story is set on Earth, where (despite the fact that Earth was destroyed eight months previously) Arthur meets Fenchurch, a girl from Rickmansworth who figured out how the world could be happy just before it was destroyed.
As per other Douglas Adams books, Adams shows his knack for making up scientific phenomenon with hilarious effect with the Rain God being my personal favourite, although getting Arthur to fly was rather clever as well.
This book is a bit different to the others, delving more into the personality of the characters than the other books and yet is very entertaining and certainly a recommended read. If you’re thinking of buying this book, also check out the ultimate hitchhiker’s guide which contains all the main books from the hitchhiker series.
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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not very cosmic, but still a good read., 30 Jan 2004
By 
Ian Tapley "thefragrantwookiee" - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
THE STORY:
Arthur Dent returns to Earth, which he finds surprising since the planet was destroyed quite some time ago to make way for a bypass. On his homeworld he meets Fenchurch a girl who also understands that something is not right with the world (something, that is, that is not usually not right). Meanwhile, Ford Prefect is similarly confused by Earth's return, and chooses to hitchhike there to have a look for himself.
WHAT'S GOOD:
This is a far more down to earth book (in every sense) than the previous three and is a mixture between Adams' customary satire of the human race, a love story and a mystery. It's strongest element is the relationship between Arthur and Fenchurch which is witty, fun and made interesting by the fact that they are both somewhat abnormal. Something that I found personally gratifying was the appearance of Devon (my home county) and the entirely believable case of the man who, unknowingly, is a Rain God and attracts clouds like a magnet (we have a saying: Come to sunny Devon, where it rains eight days out of seven). Finally, and most importantly, this book ends with a revelation on a par with 42 being the answer to the Ultimate Question, when Arthur, Fenchurch and the always dejected Marvin discover God's Final Message to His Creation (as well as the gift shops it has spawned).
WHAT'S BAD:
The clever jokes aren't nearly so abundant here as in the previous volumes and the beloved Hitch-hikers Guide, and it's unique insights, doesn't feature much at all. I also thought that the resolution to the question about why Earth is back was an anticlimax. Marvin's appearance seemed forced and unnecesary and, worse, Adams kills him off! (Sorry if that's a spoiler...)
Good, but not as good as books 1 and 2.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One simple word, AMAZING!, 14 July 2000
By A Customer
I found this installment of the series the most amusing, plot driven, stunning one of the lot! All i can say is thanx, Douglas Adams for the great read! P.S. read the first two books first though.
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1 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star is one too many!, 6 Sep 2011
By 
A. J. Cumbo "AJGC" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Very, very poor service and unable to fulfil a simple request or help me return the incorrect product that was mis-advertised and mis-sold.

The English language, its myriad of possibilities and endless metaphors and similes cannot come close to describing how infuriating I how found this experience.
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3 of 36 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is the worst book ever written, 29 Sep 2003
I had a conversation with friends the other day about the worst book ever written. This came top, ahead of Guy N. Smith's "Crabs" trilogy and "King of Clubs - The Autobiography of Peter Stringfellow". I'm just warning you so you don't have to read it. One reviewer described it when it came out as "several sketches orbiting a non-existent plot" but they were only being kind. It's far, far worse than that; jam packed full of all the things that previously got up your nose about Douglas Adams, but you let him off with because he seemed like a nice bloke - tweeness, dinner-parties-in-space-type "zaniness", undergraduate humour, etc, etc, ad nauseum, until it all comes to a head in a ghastly and entirely unironic chapter singing the praises of Dire Straits. I'm not joking. Patrick Bateman would approve. EVEN LESS FUNNY THAN MEL AND SUE, if such a thing can ever be possible. AVOID!!!
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Life, the Universe and Everything: 3/5 (Hitchhikers Guide 3)
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