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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars epic space opera with good, unusual ideas
"Fallen Dragon" is an epic space opera with a positive plethora of good, unusual ideas. The plot is a mosaic of separate viewpoints and timelines in a 24th century universe where large corporations are major powers involved in piracy on worlds settled by colonists. Faster-than-light travel has shrunk the distances between planets and systems, but attacking corporate...
Published on 6 Sep 2005 by Semioticghost

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not up to his usual standard
Hamilton's earlier works convinced me that there was room for massive space operas on our bookshelves. The Night's Dawn trilogy managed to be be huge without ever being flabby, sadly the same cannot be said of Fallen Dragon. There's probably a decent 400 page novel in here but sadly it's swamped in an improbable tale of corporate raiders and an alien that barely makes it...
Published on 7 Nov 2002 by Mr. A. Cunningham


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars epic space opera with good, unusual ideas, 6 Sep 2005
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Paperback)
"Fallen Dragon" is an epic space opera with a positive plethora of good, unusual ideas. The plot is a mosaic of separate viewpoints and timelines in a 24th century universe where large corporations are major powers involved in piracy on worlds settled by colonists. Faster-than-light travel has shrunk the distances between planets and systems, but attacking corporate forces and revolutionary settlers have very different outlooks, which support the tension throughout the narrative.
The novel centres on a corporate soldier and former idealist, Lawrence Newton, whose experiences provide the fulcrum for the novel which otherwise suffers from a lack of characterisations, in places. Other characters' cardboard cut-out attitudes with insufficiently illustrated justifications occasionally interrupt the flow of the tale. Nonetheless, this novel provides something for action-adventure fans along with hard-core sci-fi nuts and lovers of epic alternate societies, which is a hard act to follow.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Forget the details, it�s the story we all love., 5 July 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Paperback)
Like all Hamilton stories, it's not the writing style that will capture your heart. It is the story.
Any fan of the 'Night's Dawn Trilogy' will find this book instantly likeable, due to Hamilton's trademark consistency with technological detail. But its strongest point comes through the book's main protagonists. They become humane and likable as you follow their stories across different periods of their lives.
Fans of 'Night's Dawn' may find that some of the technologies in Fallen Dragon are simply old concepts that have been given new names. But don't be put off by this, as Hamilton's real talent is for characterisation and story-telling. And the love story in this book puts many romance novels to shame.
Anyone who was moved by the emotional roller-coaster that was 'Reality Dysfunction' will undoubtedly be touched by Fallen Dragon. If you can forgive the sometimes-tedious detailing of this book, you'll be absorbed in a very decent plot that was created from a very good idea and has been told in a very touching manner.
Like all Hamilton stories, it's not the writing style that will capture your heart. It is the story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hamilton not quite at his best, 18 Jun 2002
By 
Jonathan Waterlow (Oxford) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Hardcover)
Peter F. Hamilton. Master of the multi-billion page sci-fi epic, as regards his massive Night's Dawn trilogy. In between those building-blocks of books I decided to read this most recent offering (to a small extent because it's that much shorter). Those who have read Hamilton's books before, this is very much more of the same, but his talent is such that this is no bad thing at all. Although this is meant to be a different universe to the Night's Dawn one, there really are a few too many repetitions of his previous inventions under slightly different names, such as neural nanonics' counterpart "Direct Neural Lace", and many others. Although this doesn't impact badly upon the story itself, I felt this new setting ought to have been more removed from his other works to feel properly apart from them. However, if you, like me, enjoyed his Night's Dawn universe, this is hardly going to be a bad thing.
Those who have not read Hamilton before - his books follow a certain pattern in the writing. There tend to be large chunks of background, where he insists upon outlining the history of a planet from its birth right up to the social and economic issues of its current inhabitants. In Fallen Dragon this can really wear a bit thin at times if you're not naturally interested in bouts of science-babble intake. His characters have a lot more depth than many a sci-fi novel, and he spends considerable time making the physics and biological aspects of his world believable; unless you know your space physics it's very easy to believe everything he says, such is the assured tone used and general sense most of it makes.
The story centres about Lawrence Newton, as you will have gleaned from the synopsis. However, apart from the central storyline, the book is very much about the ethics of genetic engineering and modification. Although an interesting and contemporary topic, it's a good thing the rest of the story is gripping in itself as Hamilton simply presents two arguments and comes to no real conclusion on the subject by the end of the novel. Which is quite something considering the length of it - make no bones about it, this really is a big book to get through. And it is overly long, I think. Apart from the massive detailing of scenery, with which I have little problem, I think many scenes in the book were unnecessary, or unnecessarily drawn out. Perhaps Hamilton is feeling the need to keep his "trademark" of massive books, because this one could have had almost a quarter removed, which would have left the issues and storyline a lot less diluted.
Whereas I would give "The Reality Dysfunction" a solid 5 stars, this one I was only going to give 3 at various parts of the book, because it had a tendency to become a little bland and monotonous. A lot of it is just Hamilton being Hamilton; not a bad thing until you realise the story is not advancing because he's revelling in background details. However, I would definitely recommend this as a good novel, but if you've not read Hamilton before please take a look at the Night's Dawn trilogy, or "A Second Chance at Eden", a series of his short stories and a novella, which are a lot easier going. I hope this book doesn't signify a decline in Hamilton's writing, because when at his best he is almost unbeatable. Here, though, he's just not quite on form.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another Night's Dawn?, 4 Dec 2003
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Paperback)
After a gap in writing following 'The Naked God', Peter.F.Hamilton bursts back into the genre with a book which will have you craving for more.
'Fallen Dragon' is set in the 24th Century, long before the Confederate Navy, in its place is the Zanti-Braun Corperation, which uses soldiers in near inprenertable armour, called 'Skins' in missions known as asset - realization, which involves they taking back the technology they lent to corperations to help them colonise planets.
The main character, Lawrence Newton, is such a soldier. A runaway at the age of seventeen, he joins the Z-B Coperation to get back at his parents. Years later, on a seemingly routine asset - realization mission, Lawrence and his squad meet with stiff resistance, and there seems to be more than a simple rebellion going on.
Good so far, if only Mr. Hamiliton could have gotten the timeline sorted out at the start of the book, it would have been a better read, and would have got 5/5. But, the problem is on possibly more than four seperate occasions, the book jumps back into Lawrence's flashbacks, quiet often in the middle of an action paragraph. True, all but one of the flashbacks, (the only really annoying one been the thing with Joanne), are certainly entertaining, especially the two detailing previous missions.
Most of the characters are good and varied, and while Simon Roderick is a good character, it is not established from the beginning that he has several clones, which leads to confusion later on in the story.
I must say, I bought and read this before I ever got the 'Night's Dawn Trilogy', but must say that 'Night's Dawn Trilogy' is better than 'Fallen Dragon'. Don't get me wrong, 'Fallen Dragon' is an excellent read, but certain faults prevent it from been exceedingly excellent.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars His best work, 21 Jun 2005
By 
Robert C. Wall (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Paperback)
Fallen Dragon is Hamilton's best work so far.
Why?
It actually has an ending. The writing is more concise than his other works. It feels like it has been edited. The characters are believable. There is actual exploration of real feelings and issues. The protagonist is not perfect, not super skilled in some way. He is torn by his beliefs and his experiences.
I felt betrayed by the Night's Dawn series - I read 3500 pages (paperbacks) and got crap at the end.
I really think Hamilton is a fantastic writer...I just really have a problem with buttoning up a saga in a few pages. Fortunately Fallen Dragon doesn't fall into this.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Familiar subject matter but the story telling is superb, 6 Jan 2002
By 
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Hardcover)
As has been said in other reviews, those familiar with Night's Dawn and Greg Mandel will be familiar with Hamilton's technological future. What is new - and what makes this such a thoroughly enjoyable read - is that the familiar technology is simply a backdrop to a well thought out plot. Having loved every page of Night's Dawn, the conclusion left me feeling slightly cheated - the simplicity of the ending didn't match the complexity of the build up. Not so Falled Dragon. In this one, Hamilton's got his ending right. Furthermore, like Kim Stanley Robinson in his Mars trilogy, Hamilton has written Fallen Dragon in a political, and above all economic paradigm which is entirely plausible. Don't let the reworking of existing themes put you off - this is SF at its best.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not up to his usual standard, 7 Nov 2002
By 
Mr. A. Cunningham "Tony Cunningham" (Edinburgh, Lothian Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Paperback)
Hamilton's earlier works convinced me that there was room for massive space operas on our bookshelves. The Night's Dawn trilogy managed to be be huge without ever being flabby, sadly the same cannot be said of Fallen Dragon. There's probably a decent 400 page novel in here but sadly it's swamped in an improbable tale of corporate raiders and an alien that barely makes it past the status of plot device.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Haven't we read this before?, 30 Nov 2001
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Hardcover)
As a stand-alone novel, Fallen Dragon was, of course, excellent. A plot device, which Hamilton has used before, was prominently displayed in this book - i.e. two time lines running along side one another. It really does keep you guessing and helps emphasise the conflicts raging inside the central characters. FD didn't disappoint in the plot, narrative or imagery employed. I really did enjoy this book.
However, readers familiar with Greg Mandel and Nights Dawn will be very dismayed to see the reoccurring tech and moral situations within Fallen Dragon. A variation on a theme doesn't even begin to cover what I observed here. Nanonics, ZTT (wormhole) drives, species devoted to knowledge, biotech, defunct heroes etc etc
Throw in Al Capone and we've got a sub plot from The Neutronium Alchemist. And that is ultimately what Fallen Dragon felt like.
I can't really do justice to the book in this review, seeing as it would spoil the plot for everyone concerned. Really I should give it Five Stars but I'm afraid it's only getting four.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hamilton does it again with "Fallen Dragon", 15 Oct 2001
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Hardcover)
If you've enjoyed the "Night's Dawn" trilogy then "Fallen Dragon" will not disappoint. Recognisable scenes on Earth contrast with gripping battle epics on other planets. The latter half of the book makes for some late nights - don't take this book to bed if you need to rise early.
The moral dimension is a constant backdrop to the page-turning action sequences.
This book is sure to be another success for Hamilton.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Peter F hits the spot once again!, 2 Nov 2001
This review is from: Fallen Dragon (Hardcover)
Once more Peter F Hamilton transports the reader into the future, with an intricate and detailed plot that sucks you in and doesnt disappoint.
The authors imagination of the technological innovations of the future is quite exceptional. Succeeding in being completely believable and totally cool!
The social ramifications of these changes give the technology an even more believable slant. And his ability to keep one interested in seemingly completely unrelated subplots, which give you a background in how things got to where they got is just awesome!
Do not be put off by the technological jargon, this book is a rip roaring read, with blood, guts, love, hate, heroes and evil dudes galore!
If you havent read the 'Nights Dawn Trilogy' Do it NOW, P F Hamilton is essential reading for anyone who is remotely interested in Sci Fi, this boy has a fantastic imagination! When is the next one coming out?
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Fallen Dragon
Fallen Dragon by Peter F. Hamilton (Paperback - 26 Jan 2006)
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