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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too many bodies
The fifth outing for Brian McGilloway's Inspector Benedict Devlin, pretty much following the same format as the last book; troubles at home, troubles with lacklustre authorities and troubles with hardened criminals. The first of these troubles tends to sway the novel off the well trodden track of a police investigation into the unfortunate discovery of seven little bodies...
Published on 13 May 2012 by Michael Watson

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Nameless Dead - Brian McGilloway
Set against the backdrop of present day Northern Ireland, Inspector Devlin is involved in the Commission for the Location of Victim's Remains, treading a fine line between the violent divisions of the past and the fragile peace of the future. A tip-off has led him to the possible burial place of Declan Cleary - man thought to have been killed for informing on a friend...
Published on 25 Sep 2012 by MB


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too many bodies, 13 May 2012
By 
Michael Watson "skirrow22" (Halifax, England) - See all my reviews
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The fifth outing for Brian McGilloway's Inspector Benedict Devlin, pretty much following the same format as the last book; troubles at home, troubles with lacklustre authorities and troubles with hardened criminals. The first of these troubles tends to sway the novel off the well trodden track of a police investigation into the unfortunate discovery of seven little bodies buried in a non-specific graveyard reserved for unchristened Catholics, amongst others. And it's the 'amongst others' that creates the basis for this story. The Commission for the Location of Victim's Remains discovers the body of a small child whilst searching for another body connected to the killing of an informant.

Devlin knows he cannot pursue an investigation relating to the body they were looking for but he has a hard time being convinced that this rule applies to the little girl. He remains unconvinced. It's a rather complicated plot because these later deaths of the babies all seem to lead to modern day criminals who carry on with their killing under the noses of the investigators. Devlin has, as before, significant help from his friend in the North, DI Jim Hendry, principally because the burying ground straddles the north/south border and Hendry can take a few more liberties.

Devlin's troubles at home centre aound a teenage daughter who was seriously injured in a riding incident in a previous book now finding her rebellious nature leading her to a liaison with the son of Devlin's nemesis, Morrison and Devlin's younger son feeling left out in the family heirarchy. I don't know whether all this social angst works. Another author has tried this but, for me, it tends to slow the pace of the book.

Anyway, Devlin is up and running, making discoveries about missing children, saddened mothers and criminals preying on the desperate need for some to have a child, not necessarily their own.

He's a likeable character is Ben Devlin. He gets the job done, he puts up with his seniors always looking over their shoulder - and his, wondering about their promotion chances. And he faces up to the embedded criminals in the Irish underworld on both sides of the border.

The book reads well, it's entertaining and the author manages to continue with his series, leaving the reader waiting for the next book to see where Devlin might take us.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Nameless Dead - Brian McGilloway, 25 Sep 2012
Set against the backdrop of present day Northern Ireland, Inspector Devlin is involved in the Commission for the Location of Victim's Remains, treading a fine line between the violent divisions of the past and the fragile peace of the future. A tip-off has led him to the possible burial place of Declan Cleary - man thought to have been killed for informing on a friend thirty years previously. The rules of the Commission are clear: evidence revealed by the Commission's investigations cannot lead to prosecution. But what if that evidence is discovery of a grave containing the skeleton of a baby who, it appears, did not die of natural causes? Inspector Devlin is a man who takes risks, who follows his nose and who does not like to be told that he cannot investigate what appears to be a sickening crime. So, of course, he investigates it.

What follows is an intriguing mystery, slow-paced at times but still a page-turner. Inspector Devlin's off-road enquiries rake up a past of fraud, greed and violence and the manipulation of young, vulnerable girls giving birth out of wedlock. As he begins to draw together seemingly unconnected people and events, more deaths follow and he puts his own family at risk.

The plot is believable, the characters engaging and if there's one thing I'll remember the book for, it's that scene with the drug dealer and the cess-pit. I'm sorry, I know I shouldn't have but I did laugh!

A good read with a satisfying conclusion.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A series that just gets better and better..., 5 Aug 2012
By 
Raven (England) - See all my reviews
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`The Nameless Dead' opens with the continuing search for `The Disappeared' ( the undiscovered bodies of those informers etc who have died during `The Troubles') on a small island midway between the North and South and formerly associated with cross border smuggling. Whilst the search revolves around uncovering the body of a certain Declan Cleary, a number of corpses are found linked to a former mother and baby home on the mainland, all displaying signs of physical deformities and having appeared to have died in suspicious circumstances. The story then spirals out further into an investigation of an illegal baby smuggling operation and the link between all these strands to a seemingly respectable property developer whose father had carried out drug trials at the aforementioned mother and baby home with disastrous consequences. One of the major strengths of McGilloway's writing is his vice-like grip on plot development as all the disparate threads are wound together into a seamless whole, so at no point as a reader are you led to false and unbelievable plot turns. McGilloway always stealthily avoids the over-reliance of some crime writers on the frankly lazy plot device of coincidence, so in conjunction with his strong factual detail and research the plots are always plausible and I always seem to learn something new about Irish history with every book which is an added bonus.

Following on from `The Rising' we are also witness to the trials and tribulations of Devlin's personal life as Penny continues to wreak havoc with Devlin's position as a cop and his son Shane starts to show the first signs of rebellion that his daughter is becoming so accomplished at. I really enjoy these very natural portrayals of the family unit which always seem to impact in some way on the central plot but feel unforced and add another level to the novel.

Married to this we again have a good solid depiction of Devlin as a marvellous combination of the moral yet maverick detective getting himself into scrapes again and as one of his colleagues drily remarks, " He's not a good cop. He's a walking disaster. I only hang around with him to see what he'll do next." which perfectly sums up Devlin's uncanny knack to not only always be involved in the thick of it but to also manage to annoy his superiors at every possible turn. However, contrary to his colleague's tongue in cheek comment, Devlin is a good cop and McGilloway makes us realise this through the skill of his writing and by his solid characterisation of Devlin. A good series that just gets better and better....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best so far, 31 Aug 2013
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This has been my favourite book in the Devlin series. I am enjoying the manner in which various relationships are developing,including family and colleagues. As always there is a good mix of fact and fiction with various interlinked story lines involving different agencies from either side of the border.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Unexpectedly gripping !!, 8 Aug 2014
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Brilliant book never read any of this Author's work before loved his style of writing .....the books are based in Ireland and very descriptive along side the actual story and also ties in history touching on the IRA and the troubles and the strong Catholic values of the Irish people wont give away the gist of the as dont want to spoil it for potential readers ,but you wont be disappointed !!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The nameless dead, 20 Jun 2014
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The Nameless Dead Brian McGilloway always gets you really into the books he writes
you just have to keep going to the end.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A really good read with a little history thrown in., 17 April 2014
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This crime story set in the border area between Donegal and the Derry covers crime from the 70's linked in with a story of baby smuggling, mother and child homes (for unmarried mothers) and the death and burial on un-baptised infants. A good yarn with some humour and plenty of pace.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read it!, 11 April 2014
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I live in N Ireland and I think because the books are based on the border adds to my enjoyment. I enjoy reading all of McGilloway's books. As usual this one doesn't disappoint.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Love Ireland, love this book., 11 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Nameless Dead (Inspector Devlin Mysteries) (Paperback)
You are in Ireland with its politics, its honesty and its beauty. If you have not been, you will want to go.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping read, 1 Mar 2014
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I really like this author, this book is another great one. I have now read everything I can find by him so looking forward to his next novel.
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The Nameless Dead (Inspector Devlin Mysteries)
The Nameless Dead (Inspector Devlin Mysteries) by Brian McGilloway (Paperback - 8 Nov 2012)
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