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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 21 June 2005
I find it very easy to fall straight into these books.Good descriptive writing about the weather which makes you feel cold too.It slowed down a little halfway through but still lightly gripping.I love Graftons style of writing although I do have one gripe - does she have to describe every place/room etc that she goes into? Leave a bit to the imagination.I've read 10 of the alphabet books so far and love them.I find myself having withdrawal symptoms if I don't read one for couple of months.The plots are sometimes predictable,sometimes not.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 23 July 1999
I liked the sense of humor that the author projected in this story. I thought it was neat the way she mixed the mystery and the humor together. However I was very disappointed in the ending of this book. I have to agree with the reviewer from California May 27, 1999 that said "the plot was uninteresting and the final scene absurd". I couldn't believe that after investing so much time and effort in following all the clues set forth in this story, the author would end it so abruptly? Ms. Grafton owed the reader a better explaination of what happened. I feel that I ultimately understood the ending, but I resented having to go back and re-read it over and over to get it. The story moved very slowly and I felt there should have been a pay off at the end for exercising such patients, unfortunately there wasn't. I will try some of Ms. Grafton's earlier work, but this story was not up to the usual standards of what I like to read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
In this book, Kinsey is out of her home town and like a fish out of water. Grafton captures her sense of unease and the feeling that she is out of her depth perfectly. I also thought the episodes with the stalker character were really well done, very menacing. However, I thought the story line was weak and unbelievable, although the denouement was tense and exciting. A great read for atmosphere and suspense.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 17 October 1999
In this book Kinsey has a damaged hand. Unfortunately so did I. This was the first time I had trouble identifying with her - she simply had none of the troubles I did though with two fingers dislocated. Lost my belief. Very samey. Nevertheless I'll probably continue reading them!
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If you are like me, you will see N Is for Noose as the ultimate development of the theme, "I am woman . . . hear me roar."
One of my favorite detective story lines is the one where the whole community turns against the protagonist. Despite this, the detective solves the crime. N Is for Noose follows that plot, and is well done. In fact, the book borders on the genre of the Western in many ways. Read it that way, and you'll like it better.
The book has one uncharacteristic quality for this series, Kinsey is quite slow to solve the mystery. I found that intriguing. Most problem-solving in reality is slow and ineffective. To me, it made the story more realistic and interesting to follow. Others will call it slow plot development.
The resolution in the final 40 pages or so is extremely unusual. It combines elements that are found in many other stories, but never in combination. It literally took my breath away. I could not read it fast enough, even though it is over quickly. Such a powerful coda after so many lento sections is an astonishing surprise, and one that worked well for me. Think of this book as having three long, slow movements followed by one allegro one done fortissimo!
Although this is certainly not the best book in the series, it is a very fine one. I urge you to read it, and appreciate its strengths.
Also, think about whether you really want your novels (and especially mysteries) to be too predictable. What kind of unpredictability is good? What kind isn't?
Stand up for what you believe in, too!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 August 1999
I started to read this and I had to staple my eyes open to keep myself from not reading. the plot moved so slow that my only hope was that a great ending was my reward for passing this pacience killer. Bummer. The ending was short and ridiculous. One would have to back to and retrace through the book to try to understand the ending. It was the first book I had read by Kinsey, and probably the last.
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on 17 February 1999
Let's face it. Kinsey's not the same without the all-purpose black dress, or at least a passing conversation with one of the following: Vera Lipton, Lonnie Kingman, Jonah Robb. She's at her best when lying her way through a charade she's concocted to get into someone's house or past someone's secretary. Here, it was like everyone else had her moves all figured out way, way before she did. Of course, that's how it is in a small town. You sneeze and everyone says "God bless you." I borrowed this from the library. Maybe, if the paperback is on discount, I'll go ahead and buy it just so I can someday say I've got the whole alphabet series. But that'd be the only reason. It was an OK read, but I probably wouldn't read it again, and next to K is for Killer, the one I'd least recommend to a new Sue Grafton fan. Sue is a fellow native Kentuckian, and I hate to speak evil of her, but I sure hope Kinsey gets her groove back in O:)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 April 1999
I'm confused about the ending -- did the ex-con really attack Rafer's daughter? Was that the motive for Brandt's killings? Or, if the attack was made-up to get Kinsey to suspect Rafer, where's the motive? I've read most of the Millhone series, and I thought this one was a dud.
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on 21 April 1999
This was the first time I ever managed to finish a detective story. Usually I think they are something for nerds or loners who dream of being a hero for once in their lifes. I have to admitt suddenly I am the one who would like accompany Kinsey in her investigations. Maybe it's because Kinsey is about the same age as me and she seems so normal and detached from heroism. She has weaknesses and sometimes she is scared. What I really liked is that the reader is always at the same level of knowledge as Kinsey, that nothing is being withheld and it still remains exciting. It's funny, easy to read and doesn't cost that much. Perfect for relaxation. N for Noose was given to me by a friend who discovered it by chance, I didn't hink it would interest me. Eversince N is for Noose I am binging on Sue Graftons books.
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on 10 April 1999
I've read every one of Grafton's books (in sequence, even) and I have to agree with the consensus that this isn't one of her best. Why? The small town setting, where everyone's either a cop or a waitress seemed phoney. And I didn't see the point in her running home to Santa Teresa -- it seemed like a device to drag in her local cast of characters in for a couple of chapters, and they were pretty wooden old props in this volume, weren't they? I hope that this book is an aberration and that the next one will get back on the right track, but Grafton might be excused if it's becoming harder to breathe life into her characters -- it's happened to many a mystery writer.
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