Shop now Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

11
4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 March 2000
Raban's latest book is an elegiac masterpiece of writing. He takes a tortuous journey up the dangerous 'Inside Passage',and turns this into a metaphor for his own place in the world. Anecdote,myth and bereavement are all addressed in these moving pages. In particular,the painful break-up of his marriage and the tender love he has for his daughter,are beautifully expressed. Vancouver's journey of 1792 is lyrically described.Yet another work of rare sensitivity by the very talented Mr Raban. For me,the book was marred by the spiteful preamble at the beginning,in which the china-blue-eyed 'lummox'was cruelly lampooned. Unnecessary,I felt. His affectionate,yet tense evocation of family life reminded me of the cool style of Greene,Angus Wilson and Ivy Compton-Burnett.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 September 2000
I hugely enjoyed this book. Raban's sparkling prose and his knowledge and affinity for the sea are awesome. The Northwest is very much Raban's territory, just as California was for Robert Louis Stevenson - another brilliant British-born writer. There are some fascinating similarities between these two intriguing men :both dazzle with wit, erudition, intelligence and curiosity. Raban's 'take' on the American way of life never fails to stimulate and enrich the reader's mind; and I look forward to his next book. For my money, Raban, Amis, McEwan and Rushdie are the most interesting writers around today.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 January 2000
I am a big fan of Raban and this book does not disappoint. Raban maintains the extremely high standards of narrative that we have come to expect.
This is an enthralling account of a trip from Seattle to Alaska up the 'inside passage'. Raban carefully leads us up the coast and entertains with stories on the history of the area, the indigenous peoples and the experiences of the European 'explorers'.
On a personal note this trip is bitter-sweet for Raban and the ending lingers with you long after you have finished reading.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 2 September 2000
I hugely enjoyed this book. Raban's sparkling prose and his knowledge and affinity for the sea are awesome. The Northwest is very much Raban's territory, just as California was for Robert Louis Stevenson - another brilliant British-born writer. There are some fascinating similarities between these two intriguing men :both dazzle with wit, erudition, intelligence and curiosity. Raban's 'take' on the American way of life never fails to stimulate and enrich the reader's mind; and I look forward to his next book. For my money, Raban, Amis, McEwan and Rushdie are the most interesting writers around today.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 7 March 2000
An enthralling,magisterial book. Raban is every bit at home in Alaska,at sea,or in the back garden of a semi in Market Harborough ! Truly a writer of vision and stature.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 30 January 2000
Raban's empathetic understanding of the sea - Sea - is again evident. Lyrical in parts, heavy-going at times, it probably fails to convey the impression of movement in his earlier works, but old salts may disagree with my landlubber impression. An agonising twist at the end makes you hope he Raban expands on what happened next.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 27 September 2010
A good read and a well crafted one one that provides lots of information on sailing, the sea and the Alaskan coast with a stretching vocabulary that had me reaching for my dictionary, woven around the author's sailing trip along the inside passage from Seattle to Juneau.[[ASIN:0330346296 Passage To Juneau: A Sea and Its Meaning]
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 12 October 2014
An extraordinary mixture of personal journey, history, geology, geography - full of wonderful things.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 19 April 2015
All fine but present for my dad who hasn't read it yet.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 March 2000
Once again,Raban has written a brilliantly clever book. He is a master of post-modern irony and wit. Only Raban could turn his father's funeral into farce (black humour reminiscent of Joe Orton at his best);portray his wife as a brain-dead shrew;and his daughter as a tiresomely spoilt brat throughout. All this is written in the dead-pan quintessentially British manner of Ivy compton-Burnett,Angus Wilson and Waugh. Hilarious! Alaska becomes a mere backdrop to the dramas going on in Market Harborough; and when Raban brings the whole gruesome crew together for the final tableau vivant,or should I say tableau mort,the only person to escape unscathed is his gifted,clever and gentle son who was fortuitously absent from the proceedings! By some subtle alchemy,Raban is able to turn a China-blue eyed lummox into a graceful dolphin,and a school of friendly dolphins into graceless clodhoppers! Masterful stuff. The only sad note is his portrayal of his poor relationship with his late father. Why is is that effete,stroppy,sickly little boys always have brutish ogres for fathers. They seem drawn together by some ghastly synergy. At his best,Raban is bitchily camp (see his descriptions of Captain Van and several mad,cloak-wearing great-uncles!),and even in the more lugubrious passages of the book,he never disappoints. More! soon! Please!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Passage To Juneau: A Sea and Its Meaning
Passage To Juneau: A Sea and Its Meaning by Jonathan Raban (Paperback - 27 Sept. 2000)
£12.99

Driving Home: An American Scrapbook: An Emigrants Reflections Pb
Driving Home: An American Scrapbook: An Emigrants Reflections Pb by Jonathan Raban (Paperback - 21 Jun. 2012)
£9.99

Coasting (Picador Books)
Coasting (Picador Books) by Jonathan Raban (Paperback - 5 May 1995)
£12.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.