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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A mesmerising read
This is an astonishing and spellbinding book, a triumph of writing and storytelling. The first sentence is sufficient to draw the reader into a journey from a father's deathbed to the wild plains of the American West. But the time could be the present with its drab towns, unemployment and men either too intelligent or too stupid for the lives they are trapped in. The...
Published on 5 Oct. 1999

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story, but.........................
JonDoe has commented on the lack of quotation marks in this book and it isn't just the Kindle version. I read the border trilogy in print form some time ago and had exactly the same problems in following passages of dialogue. Even more baffling for me though, were the passages of untranslated Spanish. I could cope like most people with simple greetings and everyday...
Published on 17 Aug. 2012 by Bookworm


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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A mesmerising read, 5 Oct. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy) (Paperback)
This is an astonishing and spellbinding book, a triumph of writing and storytelling. The first sentence is sufficient to draw the reader into a journey from a father's deathbed to the wild plains of the American West. But the time could be the present with its drab towns, unemployment and men either too intelligent or too stupid for the lives they are trapped in. The author can describe the American landscape with an honesty and lyricism that echoes the finest ancient literature. He does this in a unique style that sounds like the voice of a hardened cowboy who understands deeply his horses and his land. This book leaves Hollywood versions of the west behind in the dust. For McCarthy's world is tragic and poetic, blackened with brutality and rotten justice as much as it sparkles with the beauty of nature. Its heroes are tough, battered and compelling to the last page.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book full of rugged but beautiful prose, 15 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Paperback)
In the first instalment of his border trilogy, Cormac McCarthy has distanced himself somewhat from the bleak and dark themes and characters he created in his first novels, such as The Orchard Keeper and Outer Dark, and reset his prose in western America, in the border country that divides America from Mexico. Into this landscape of harsh beauty, he puts John Grady Cole, our protagonist, and his friend Lacey Rawlins, two old school cowboys who see the western life that they love changing, and decide to leave for Mexico in search of work as 'Vaqeuros', ranchers. On their way they encounter Blevins, a dangerous young boy with a keen shot riding a stolen horse. Their experiences shape the story into what i believe to be one of the finest books written by an American author in decades. McCarthy's prose is a joy to read, and the dialogue is often poignant and hilarious. And he also delivers what is probably the greatest fight scene in contemporary literature. Poetic, beautiful, funny, and at times almost unbearingly sad, read this.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pretty Pictures in a Harsh World, 28 Aug. 2009
By 
Patrick Shepherd "hyperpat" (San Jose, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy) (Paperback)
McCarthy has been both praised and damned for his lyrical, poetic, non-grammatical, punctuation-less, rare-word-studded prose, and this style is very much in evidence here. From the opening sentence to the last page, this style is ever present, becoming almost remorseless in its tone and evocation of time and place. If you've never read one of his works before, it might take you awhile to adjust to it, but once you do, the images it paints in your head will become brilliant and indelible.

The other renowned McCarthy trait, that of celebration of violence, brutality, of a harsh world where only the most determined survive, is present here also, but for this book it seems as if this fades a bit into the background, under the cover of a compelling coming-of-age story of a young sixteen year old horse-loving cowboy John Grady Cole who wanders off to Mexico in search of employment and finds his first love. Along the way we are treated to quite a bit of philosophical ruminations about religion and life's obstacles, problems, and purpose, frequently delivered in very short sentences of dialogue that are almost baldly stated, with little back-up ratiocination to justify their conclusions. It's not until nearly the end that we are treated to a multi-page discourse on these subjects, delivered by the girl's elderly aunt as almost an aside to the main story, but this section is really the heart of the book, and colors and limns all of Cole's actions and fate.

Cole's character is well defined, for all that we never really get inside his head (another McCarthy trait), as his minimal statements and large actions create the picture of just who and what he is. Unlike many of McCarthy's characters, Cole has a strong moral compass quite capable of withstanding the vicissitudes and chance disasters that happen along the way, a compass that shapes Cole as a most atypical McCarthy actual hero. Cole's traveling companion Rawlins and his love Alejandra are not so well defined, are almost stereotypical characters there to support the story and little more, while Blevins, the chance pick-up fellow traveler to Mexico, seems to be the embodiment of McCarthy's opinion about what should (and will) happen to the weak and foolish.

There is a fair amount of un-translated Spanish here. If you don't know the language, this may be a little off-putting, but I found most of the meaning of these passages to be derivable from context or Latin roots, but in few places I had to turn to my Spanish-speaking wife to find out what was being said. But missing some of this will not hurt your overall understanding of what's going on, as these sections rarely have great significance.

This is a gritty, realistic story. There are scenes within this that point out in no uncertain terms just how mean, dirty, brutal, and despicable people can be. Nor is there any Pollyanna ending, merely a continuation of the drive to live, and what's done is the past, unchangeable. But reading this just might form an indelible image in your mind, one that will color all your future impressions of life.

---Reviewed by Patrick Shepherd (hyperpat)
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time in Mexico, 6 April 2006
This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy) (Paperback)
I'd never been greatly compelled to read a book in such a typically cinematic genre, but this is incredible. It combines the bloodthirsty epic sweep of the great Sergio Leone spagetti westerns with the harsh realism of later revisionist works such as Unforgiven. All this described in a language born of the genre - McCarthy has developed a kind of pure-Western prose seeped in the rugged, open country, the tough men trapped in their interior worlds, their bleak fatalism and capacity for violence. Its envisioning of Mexico as the new frontier for a dying breed of ranch men (ie., cowboys) is realised with unromanticised poeticism. The writing - like the cowboy dialogue - is economic yet vast in its capacity to evoke the landscape and its protagonists deep respect for it. McCarthy also has a great ear for dialogue that enriches what might otherwise be perceived to be rather clichéd characterisations, such as the ruthless Mexican captain. The first in McCarthy's Border Trilogy - this has also been adapted into a movie by Billy Bob Thornton that I haven't yet seen.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not reallly a western! Fascinating action novel, 1 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
Strange title - I only found it by chance because it is read by Brad Pitt. The first of a trilogy, this first book concerns one of the characters, the second another, and the two are brought together in the third. John Grady Cole, the hero, and his friends leave home at an early age and seek work on the ranches of Mexico. Here he finds love and also suffers much injustice and lawlessness, growing in character and stature the while. Many authors make the mistake of going into too much description, or expatiate about their characters emotions. McCarthy never does this; his prose is spare and basic, and only what you would have seen had you been there is described, never the thoughts or feelings of the characters. Nevertheless the landscape comes vividly before you and you do come to understand and care about the characters. Brad Pitt has just the right voice for it, sort of soft and smokey, with an accent you can imagine the characters using. Occasionally his intonation made me wonder if he completely understood what he was reading, but generally a good impression. I have gone on to listen to the other two books in the trilogy, so it must have been good!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishingly good, 6 July 2008
By 
Melmoth (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy) (Paperback)
There is a power in the words of Cormac McCarthy, a power that can take a reader up to the high ground and show him the land around and the people in it and make that reader know those people as he knows the scars on his body and the old ache in his limbs and the cold and lonely feeling that comes upon him in the middle of the night.

McCarthy ropes and ties his powerful words with the skill of a man born to the task, dancing nimbly through the herd, spying out his chosen phrases with an easy and accustomed eye and bringing them down with one swift movement, all the while whispering to them of the place he will give them in his great work and of all the things he and they will do together and of the wonders they will create.

There is a rhythm about All the Pretty Horses that belongs to mighty rivers and the slow, dignified dances that old men make in far-off lands. It pulls the reader along through a tale such as they say isn't told any more, a tale of friendship and of love and of honour and of death. As the wild horses move out upon the plains and sierras of Mexico, so young John Cole roves from his mother's fading Texas ranch to the strange, sad land to the south. In that land he finds fear and friendship and a large capacity for loyalty to his friends, his beliefs and the young woman he believes he loves more even than the horses, whose hoofbeats match the pulsing of the blood in his veins.

All the pretty horses is a rare and magnificent book, a genuine modern masterpiece.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Western for the 20th century, 2 Jun. 2008
By 
reader 451 - See all my reviews
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This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy) (Paperback)
Adventure, full-hearted love, revenge, the majestic wilderness, and of course horses: the western-movie staples are what moves this novel. Yet if All The Pretty Horses is a classic cowboy story, it is also that of a dying world, and all the more accessible to us that it is set in the post-war era.

John Grady Cole, a young man of 16 years, leaves the country for Mexico together with his friend Lacey Rawlins, both on horseback, in search of a life that has become inaccessible to them in Texas. A cruel but romantic saga of tests and tribulations awaits them - which I won't spoil by giving too much of it.

The dialogues are suitably laconic. The characters are frank and unambiguous, except for one key exception. Nature is reserved the richer, more complex, and admiring language. While the novel begins at a slow pace, making the reader wonder whether this is really a back-to-the-wild story, the action later quickens to a satisfyingly gripping climax. One warning: a good part of the dialogue is in Spanish, untranslated; though this won't throw you off the plot, if you don't understand Spanish, it may get annoying.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spellbinding .. what a story, 21 July 2008
By 
A. J. Sudworth "tonysudworth" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: All the Pretty Horses (Paperback)
I've read 'The Road' and 'No Country' but this is better - much better.
On the face of it its a road movie (on horses) but this is also about love, friendship and a strength of character that you just don't seem to see these days. This was an absolute pleasure to read, just taking you there and making you part of the story. I read this is almost one sitting I was so taken with the story. Its not action packed but its a compelling story about a boy growing up. He leaves his family ranch as its sold off and rides down to Mexico with his best friend to find another life.
There are shootings, a picture of Mexico that has long gone, injustice , being falsely imprisoned and surviving an attempted knife attack, and a love affair with the daughter of the ranch he ends up working on that has heartbreak written all over it
But its written so well that you just get sucked in and the conversation with the judge at the end of the story is just spellbinding
I've got all three in the Border Trilogy in one volume but I had to write a review of the first part at once - its that good
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story, but........................., 17 Aug. 2012
JonDoe has commented on the lack of quotation marks in this book and it isn't just the Kindle version. I read the border trilogy in print form some time ago and had exactly the same problems in following passages of dialogue. Even more baffling for me though, were the passages of untranslated Spanish. I could cope like most people with simple greetings and everyday remarks but some of these passages in Spanish were quite complex. For example in the second book The Crossing a Mexican trapper explains to Billy Parham how to set a trap for a wolf and to cover his own scent around the area so as not to deter the wolf. All of this is in Spanish with some colloquial expressions and all of it untranslated. I was able to find and download translations of all the passages in all three books but I found the constant switching between book and printouts quite distracting.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, 29 May 2013
By 
P. Hadley - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
For me CM's (hell I used an apostrophe and only 3 words in) work is just about perfect. You cannot be a passenger. You have to work too. The reader is a participant in the mechanics of the narration If you loose concentration you will need to retrace. The use of Spanish works well. I do not speak Spanish nor am I familiar with the dialect used but it is usually obvious within the English text what they are on about. Same goes for the omission of quotation marks. The reader needs to work a little. It is not gifted to you on a plate. I found that I was stimulated by the book on many different levels. This book is the first in the Border Trilogy: All The Pretty Horses, The Crossing and Cities of the Plain. They work best read in that order. I made the mistake of reading in the order of 1,3 & 2. And regret it.
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All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy)
All the Pretty Horses (Border Trilogy) by Cormac McCarthy (Paperback - 3 Aug. 2007)
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