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4.4 out of 5 stars207
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 1 September 2004
I am deeply disappointed that both books are still in circulation. The Deeper Meaning of Liff (TDMOF) is an updated edition of The Meaning of Liff (TMOF), it contains all the definitions found in TMOF and a significant number more. So why oh why is TMOF still being sold???? Don't make the same mistake I did, I bought both together.
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on 3 August 2009
There are signs at the end of the road with names that are made up. Places like Wetwang and Grimsby. But there are situations that don't have names. Like the bit of fluff you always find in your trouser pocket after coming out of the laundry, or the piece of gristle in a a pork pie. Douglas Adams( of Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy fame) and John Lloyd (also a prolific comedy writer) collaborated to produce a hilarious reference book. So many surprises. They followed it up with two more but this one is the taster. I feel very sure that after reading this first one you will be crying(tears of laughter) out for more. Excellent.
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on 22 October 2001
The meaning of Liff is unputdownable...not as much as in the best seller sense as a cigarette addiction..you will go back for the same stuff just because of its power of unalloyed joy
this book is a great party tool...can recollect the hours through several nights when 'Liff' has generated near-death experiences due to abdominal seizures of laughter..when one reads out and others get ready for getting convulsed and hit the floor
absolutely priceless creation..a different flavour of genius from the hitchhiker theme
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on 6 December 2000
The idea behind The Meaning of Liff, first published in 1983, as well as The Deeper Meaning of Liff, which followed seven years later, is actually quite simple. As the authors put it: there are hundreds of common experiences, feelings, situations and even objects which we all know and recognize, but for which no word exists. On the other hand, the world is littered with thousands of spare words doing nothing but loafing about on signposts pointing at places.
Douglas Adams - the one of the Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy fame - and John Lloyd have done their best trying to pair the two. Just for the gusto, here's an example of dictionary entry: Wyoming (ptcpl.vb.) Moving in hurried desperation from one cubicle to another in a public lavatory trying to find one which has a lock on the door, a seat on the bowl and no brown streaks on the seat.
Although The Deeper Meaning of Liff is significantly expanded in size over the original, I guess I would choose the latter. While The Meaning of Liff mostly covers place names from the Britain, the expansions seem to be predominantly reaching abroad, resulting in somewhat diluted compendium. After all, there is some logic that English place names are fitting best in an English dictionary, isn't it?
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on 14 September 2013
I was in on Liffs from the very beginning, having first encountered the concept in the form of the "Oxtail English Dictionary" in the "Not The 1982 Calendar". At first sight anyone new to Liffs might think that "The Deeper Meaning of Liff" would be the ideal book to buy, since it is essentially the original book with a lot of new Liffs added - but political correctness has been at work, and somehow for me it lacks the fearless edginess of the original. Still, the new ones are generally still of a high standard, so it is very much worth buying. However if you are new to Liffs, I would recommend getting hold of the original "Meaning of Liff".
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on 15 July 2012
Similar to "The Meaning of Liff", I already have this book, and thought it would be great for a friend about to have surgery. It's the sort of book one can pick up for a few minutes, have a giggle (as long as she doesn't burst her stitches), smile, and put down easily. I didn't want to lose my copy, so I've bought her a new one - but I'll not let her have it until she goes into hospital. Some of the words in this book are now in our family language.
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on 13 March 2010
The description should explain that this is an expanded version of the original "Meaning of Liff". Both are brilliant, but there is little point in buying both.
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on 14 May 2001
One of the wittiest, cleverest books I have seen in such a slim volume. All the words you'll never need are found in here. Hours of entertainment - Adams at his inventive best
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on 8 December 2012
I really love this book. I first encountered it in a friend's bathroom for light reading! The words are all place names in and around Great Britain and they are attached to meanings for which no word exists, but should, such as Duntish (adj): mentally incapacitated by a severe hangover, and Camer (n.) A mis-tossed caber.
This is an excellent book to dip into as the mood takes you.
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on 9 May 2009
'The Deeper meaning of Liff' is fairly typical Douglas Adams stuff. It gives amusing descriptions for place names, mostly in the UK, but with a smattering of foreign places too. It's slight, entertaining and grows on you.
We have our favourite definitions, such as Grimbister, Beccles and Dobwalls. All are ones with which any reader can easily identify. There's no point in giving the definitions here, as that would rather spoil the fun. Quite a few have sexual associations, but the curious sly wording makes them entertaining rather than crude.
Not long ago we actually drove through Dobwalls (in Cornwall). There was a definite buzz to doing so.
I've bought two copies, the more recent to send to a friend in the USA, who found he could understand and enjoy about two-thirds of the definitions - the rest are clearly only for Brits.
I've never read the earlier 'The Meaning of Liff', but will buy it one of these days.
Not a weighty read, but I come back to it every so often, mostly as something to take to the loo when my current reading is downstairs.
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