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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a holistically funny book!
Dirk Gently owns a 'holistic detective agency', believing that as all things are connected, seemingly random coincidences can solve a mystery. The mystery needing to be solved now involves a coke machine, disappearing- and re-appearing- norse gods, an american woman in england, a strange eagle that may have more to it than meets the eye, a private hospital for 'strange'...
Published on 19 May 2005 by Ms. Caitlin B. Blanchard

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3.0 out of 5 stars My Intro to Adams..it's ok!
OK, heckle me now..This was my first Adams, mid-way through my twenties. For that, I have no excuse whatsoever.

To be honest though, I wasn't massively impressed. I liked some of his characters (well, Dirk Gently anyway), and I liked the general theme of the book (the difficult position of ye olde Gods in the 20th century). But to be honest, once our intrepid...
Published on 6 Nov. 2009 by R. Davies


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor value for money, 20 Feb. 2015
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NOT a Dirk Gently novel but a collection of previously published articles and essays. Disappointing
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not one of his best, 31 Aug. 2010
By 
John Moseley (Portsmouth, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul (Paperback)
I love Douglas Adams as a truly original (as far as anyone ever can be) writer, but this isn't his best work. The writing is great but the story is cumbersome and mildly irritating in its resolution. Adams is a master of combining great storytelling and an unsurpassed turn of phrase with fantastical storylines which border on the downright silly. But the battle between Norse God father and son Odin and Thor and a really annoying giant eagle are steps too far. It's a real pity, both that this book doesn't quite work (for me) and that Adam's output was notoriously small. There was more life in the anti-heroic character of Dirk Gently and perhaps further books would have found Adams into his usual, brilliant stride.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Confusing but Humorous Book, 6 Nov. 1997
By A Customer
A long dark tea-time of the soul. Only the title makes you aware of Adam's genious way of writing. The dark time of our souls... It is written with a British humor which I love, being áboring Swede'. Sometimes it really confuses me and I have to read a few parts twice, but it is generally a great novel with a silly sense of humor. He geniously connects to his other books, i.e. by having a sofa from `The hitchhiker's...` (I think) appear. There are lots of encounters with Gods, especially Thor and Oden (Odin in Eng.) If you liked 'The Hitch-hiker's...'you will love this as well as 'Dirk Gently's Holistic Agency`.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 27 July 2014
Vastly inferior to Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 12 Jan. 2015
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We lost a great dreamer when Dougie left us. :(
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 16 Jun. 2015
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Up-to Douglas Adams usual standard
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars D. Adams manages to increase the suspense in the reader., 9 Jan. 1998
By A Customer
The story opens with an explosion at Heathrow Airport. This introduces the female main character Kate Schechter trying to find the Norwegian man she met there just before the explosion. At the same time, Dirk Gently gets involved in that case. He, as a private detective, firstly wants to find out what has happened to his ex-secretary Janice Smith. Soon, while the plot is unfolding, the Norse gods become the main theme because their power has decreased in modern society. So, one of the gods makes a contract with two human beings in order to be able to enjoy human comfort although he loses his immortal soul. As Dirk Gently believes in the "fundamental interconnectedness of all things", it all makes sense in the end.
Douglas Adams does not hand you the answer on a silver platter, though, so that some parts have to be reread.
The single events of the storyline are unpredictable, which makes the book so exciting, and the reader is guided by Kate and Dirk.
With great skill the author changes the levels of language where necessary and uses his English sense of humour. In the end, Dirk and Kate have improved their knowledge about the workings of the universe. What I liked best while reading were the various lines of action.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 18 Feb. 2015
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good condition as described
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well written but confusing story line., 28 July 1996
By A Customer
When Dirk Gently, not-so-master-detective, is on the case, who know what can happen? The story opens with an explosion in an airport. This introduces the female lead character and basis of the story. While moving through the story you learn that the old Norse Gods were actually real, but as their human believers dwindled, their powers became less and less. As a large scam between the most powerfull god, a human lawer, and an advitiser rocks the world of the gods, Dirk Gently must smooth everything out, or else the balence between the God's world and the human world will tip, and the angry Gods will run amuck!
While this story is supremely written, a couple parts need to be reread a couple times so you can follow the story line. Adam's familiar humor and observations are just a prevalent, and just as funny as always. If you like this twisted story line as a break from all the other predictable Fantasies, this book is for you!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 13 Nov. 2014
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Great Product
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The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul
The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul by Douglas Adams (Paperback - 13 Oct. 1989)
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