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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A disturbing view on the everyday life of a factory worker
Any spiritually-minded person that has had experience of tedious factory work will relate to this book.
Smallcreep is slightly obsequious worker who knows his rank and place in this huge foundry gives a fascinating commentary . On a quest for the General Parts Stores as he drifts through the workshops and offices which are full of weird surreal characters and...
Published on 14 May 2002 by MARTIN (WOOD GREEN)

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Stream of consciousness
There are parts of this book that are sublime. Strange, weird and intensely imaginative. But this stream of consciousness device comes at a cost to a main story. With bizarre events happening in quick succession, I lose track of what Smallcreep is looking for and why he doesn't just go home to normality.

Definitely a book for those who like this sort of thing...
Published 14 months ago by J. Harding


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A disturbing view on the everyday life of a factory worker, 14 May 2002
By 
MARTIN (WOOD GREEN) (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books) (Paperback)
Any spiritually-minded person that has had experience of tedious factory work will relate to this book.
Smallcreep is slightly obsequious worker who knows his rank and place in this huge foundry gives a fascinating commentary . On a quest for the General Parts Stores as he drifts through the workshops and offices which are full of weird surreal characters and machinery you get feelings of absolute loneliness, despair and isolation. Not only is the book damning of factory life and mindless people it also attacks the hum-drum banality of everyday life, consumerism and politics. You are given the impression that the factory is actually portrayed as the tedious circle of life in which we live and Smallcreep's eventual return to his machine after the round tour demonstrates this, the last few pages scream in desperation at the despicable tedium mankind has created for himself.
It appears that this novel was one-off by the author who has obviously written from experience, the sleeve says that he gave up factory work entirely and runs his own pottery.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars surreal, strange and misanthropic, 13 May 2002
By 
MARTIN (WOOD GREEN) (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books) (Paperback)
I have just re-read this novel after twenty-two years and wonder why I left it for so long.
This book is a strange and surreal commentary as factory worker Pinquean Smallcreep doing a mundane repetetive job as a machine operator attempts to discover what goes on elswhere in his place of work and getting into some very odd situations as a result. This book has a very misanthropic view on the entire structure of 1970's industrial relations, people, and life itself. The storyline would make an excellent art-house film.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Smallcreep's Day rises again, 9 Sep 2008
By 
J. Preece (Newport, South Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books) (Paperback)
Full marks to Pinter & Martin for republishing this long-unavailable classic. Smallcreep's surreal journey through the inside of a factory is gripping, highly imaginative, and bizarre. Brown worked in R A Lister's engineering works in Dursley when he wrote this book; at one time the factory employed over 4000 but is now much reduced. Curiously, J K Rowling named Harry Potter's boring uncle 'Dursley'. She never knew that it had already inspired Brown's 1960s masterpiece. Brown never wrote another book: he never felt he had to.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unique, surreal, Alice-in-Factoryland, 12 July 2012
This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books) (Paperback)
I have the old Panther paperback from 40-odd years ago, and I read it every two or three years. I always relish the factory atmosphere and culture, while usually skipping the scatology. This is a good example of the rebirth of surrealism in Britain in the 1960s, short-lived though it was. Well worth a read. Smallcreep's factory takes me back 42 years, when I watched a chap on an Ohio broaching machine, cutting gears for Bristol buses; he'd hung a row of different-sized gears on wires above his machine, and, for a cigarette, would take a peen hammer and play
"A Double Diamond Works Wonders, So Drink One Today." Only in England, eh?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A surreal journey through an epic factory, 12 Feb 2008
By 
T. BRADY-JACOBS (liverpool UK) - See all my reviews
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I first read this in the Picador version, but lent it out so many times that it went missing. It took years to find another version, this the original panther print, and it does not dissapoint, even from this distance in time. The story concerns the quest of a 'small man', working on the conveyor belt of a vast factory, who sets out one day with a packet of sandwiches, to find out what he makes. His phantasmagoric adventures recall Bunyan, Pynchon or Brautigan, with a dash of a strong working-mans experience of politics thrown in. From the stygian depths of this epic structure to the almost paradisical office life far far above, he fixes all aspects of the factory life with an hallucinatory eye, and the end, as he discovers the results of his lifes work is well worth the journey.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars surrealist workingman's mystery play, 10 Mar 2010
By 
Adam Golding (Devon UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books) (Paperback)
I read this book when it was first published and was reminded of it recently, so I sought out a copy. It is far darker and more surreal than I remembered, and better!

I have worked in various machine shops and factories and there were so many resonances and strange memories that I found it quite draining to read, and had to read it in small 'sips'. A total once in a lifetime book, the only book I can compare it to is 'The third Policeman' which is nothing like it, but somehow equally wonderful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life with a twist?, 9 Nov 2009
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This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Paperback)
A surreal look at life working in the large factories or a look at life? Where unions and management clash, and everybody has a place and a place for everybody. The utter futility of mankinds endeavours is explored as smallcreep goes in search of the answer to his question, meeting all manner of people along the way. From the lowest sewage worker to the chairman. he's dragged along by men, follows naked women explores life and death and finally gets.............
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5.0 out of 5 stars Why I quit the factory life., 31 Dec 2013
By 
D. Williams "Bluesboy" (Birmingham, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Paperback)
I read this when first published back in the 60's. At the time I was working on a factory production line wishing I was somewhere else. I quit and took up office work that lasted until my recent retirement. Glad I did. This would make a good surreal film, perhaps in the hands of Terry Gilliam.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Stream of consciousness, 23 April 2013
By 
J. Harding "Joe 90" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Kindle Edition)
There are parts of this book that are sublime. Strange, weird and intensely imaginative. But this stream of consciousness device comes at a cost to a main story. With bizarre events happening in quick succession, I lose track of what Smallcreep is looking for and why he doesn't just go home to normality.

Definitely a book for those who like this sort of thing. I struggled with it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Well written, 1 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Smallcreep's Day (Paperback)
This book was recommended by a friend. Very well written and I always wanted to work in a factory as I thought it would be fun. Well I now have a different view!!!
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Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books)
Smallcreep's Day (Picador Books) by Peter Currell Brown (Paperback - 4 May 1973)
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