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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exactly what HDR has been waiting for!!!
I guess it's fair to say that there are few topics in Photography that cause as much of a reaction, be it good or bad, than HDR...people either love it or loathe it!

I guess it's also fair to say that most people's exposure (excuse the pun) to HDR would have been the highly overprocessed, surrealistic, fantasy look with masses of detail, dark clouds and...
Published on 19 July 2011 by Glyn Dewis

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not great for experienced HDR photographers
I'm a big fan of RC Conception's work and his willingness to help other photographers, but I was really disappointed by this book. My main complaint is that the book much in the way of information and inspiration for anyone who already understands the basics of HDR.

The book essentially consists of a couple of initial chapters covering i) what HDR is; ii) what...
Published on 10 Jun 2012 by Mr Andrew Beirne


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not great for experienced HDR photographers, 10 Jun 2012
This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
I'm a big fan of RC Conception's work and his willingness to help other photographers, but I was really disappointed by this book. My main complaint is that the book much in the way of information and inspiration for anyone who already understands the basics of HDR.

The book essentially consists of a couple of initial chapters covering i) what HDR is; ii) what type of photos it is good for (sadly this is basically a list of ten items with pictures by them); and iii) how the three different pieces of HDR software RC uses - Photomatix, Nik HDR Efex Pro and Photoshop - work. The remaining 9 or so chapters show different HDR pictures(one per chapter) and how to create them with each piece of Software and a few finishing touches.

A first point here, if like most people you only use one of the pieces of software for HDR, half of this book is basically wasted on you since you can easily skip over the stuff on other software.

The bigger problem for me was that the mechanics of the software is fairly obvious (if it's not, then check out online tutorials) so 9 examples how to position the various sliders for the software wasn't useful. Beyond that the adjustments RC detailed were fairly simplistic - selectively changing white balance and adding glow.

So, my advice is to think carefully before buying this book - are you basically happy with your HDR technique and just seeking inspiration and new techniques to polish those images? If so, maybe this isn't for you.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exactly what HDR has been waiting for!!!, 19 July 2011
By 
Glyn Dewis "Dinkiz" (Buckinghamshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
I guess it's fair to say that there are few topics in Photography that cause as much of a reaction, be it good or bad, than HDR...people either love it or loathe it!

I guess it's also fair to say that most people's exposure (excuse the pun) to HDR would have been the highly overprocessed, surrealistic, fantasy look with masses of detail, dark clouds and saturated colours. However, there's so much more on offer than that, as this new book by Photographer, Photoshop Guru and all round `Go To Guy' RC Concepcion shows...

As you would expect the book starts off by covering the photography side of things with regards to what it takes to capture images for making a HDR image; camera settings, number of exposures, equipment and so on and then moves on to discuss what kind of images should be considered for HDR.

Like most things, when we discover and start dabbling in a new technique there can be a tendency to use it on everything and HDR especially is one of those techniques that needs to be handled with `kid gloves' and used wisely as it definitely won't suit everything. RC does a great job of discussing where it can be appropriately used; sure it's not a definitive list but through his obvious experience of HDR he clearly has a pretty good idea where and where not to use it.

Where I think this book is set to be a winner though is not how it covers the `capture' side of the HDR but in covering the post-processing side of things; let me explain...

There's no question that HDR is an extremely useful technique to have in your photography `tool bag' allowing full detail in the shadow and highlight areas across an entire image but if that's the case why has it attracted such vocal reactions against it in the past? ... well, the answer lies in the post processing, and this is exactly where RC nails it!

Capturing the necessary images to make up a HDR isn't rocket science. Once you've chosen your subject and you understand how to capture the necessary shots all at varying exposures, you're up and running in no time but it's how you `complete' the image when sat at the computer that it all comes together.

Having explained the capture process, the rest of the book is made up of projects showing how to post-process a whole range of images such as dimly lit interiors, landscape, real estate, black and white images and portraits...yes HDR can be used extremely well for portrait shots but again it's knowing the how, when and what that is so important and this RC covers in great detail.

What I particularly like about RC's approach throughout the book is that he doesn't push any one particular processing software and rather deals with the 3 main players (Photomatix, Nik HDR Efex Pro and Photoshop) and covers the pros and cons of each, so that you can make your choice of what to use as opposed to feeling compelled to make yet another purchase.

Through an understanding of the editing process RC shows how to edit your images to be `photorealistic' through to the `surrealistic' depending on what you prefer and as you'd expect, the pages are packed full of some wonderful examples.

In the past I've `dabbled' in HDR but it's something that I tended to steer away from because I, like most, had a preconceived idea of what it was having seen the `fantasy' type images in the past. However, when you look at the work of folks like Joel Grimes who makes use of HDR in his images I'm now of the opinion that I need to look at it a lot closer and that I'm going to look at putting together some HDR backgrounds for use in my workshop [Link].

So, to summarise...RC's done it again by producing another `killer' book and a book that people have been wanting for quite some time...

Finally HDR isn't a dirty word!

Highly Recommended
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sooo useful!, 26 Jan 2012
By 
M. Wootton (Bridgnorth, Shropshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
Fantastic! I love HDR so long as it's not overdone and have been using another HDR book in the past that was OK but this one really hits the mark. It takes an ordinary HDR image and shows you how to turn it into a great HDR image in easy to follow stages. Thank you, R.C. You have written a book that should be essential reading for everyone interested in taking their HDR images up to HDR masterpices! Buy it, you won't be disappointed!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enhancing Photographs, 21 Aug 2011
By 
J. M. Eade "Jeade" (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
This is a book about a niche photographic process which produces some astonishing results. At the end of the day it is a matter of taste, personally I do not like some of the more extreme photos.
Taking the bracketed shot is dealt with briefly but before buying the book you need to check how easily your camera will take the three shots needed. What is good about the book is that there is in depth information on how to use different programmes, not just Photoshop. I found it very useful, it certainly cleared up some of the practical problems I had experienced. However, you need to be serious about taking HDR otherwise it is a waste of money.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good book, 6 Oct 2012
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
This was bought as a present so I cannot comment personally on it, especially as it is a technical book on a subject I know nothing about, but my son,for whom it was bought, has said that he has found it very helpful and has very much enjoyed it. He does a lot of post processing on his photos to get different effects and he says it is a very good book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best on this topic for those new to the concept, 13 July 2012
By 
Andy_atGC (London UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
The purpose of HDR techniques was originally for visual effect but it is now often used not only for that but to compensate for the more limited dynamic range of digital cameras. With film, it was often possible to have an exposure that showed detail in all but the very deepest of shadows and, at the same time, also to show some detail in the lightest of highlights. Digital cannot quite do that; you have three simple choices - expose for the shadows and the mid-range will be OK but the highlights mostly burnt out, expose for the mid-range and have some shadow and highlight details but not all of both or expose for the highlights and lose all shadow detail. However, with HDR you can do all three in separate exposures normally with 2 stops difference in exposure between the shadow and mid-range exposures and two stops again between the mid-range and highlight exposures. With three exposures, unless you want to show it, your subject needs not to have any movement and a tripod or other stable platform will be needed.

Some cameras have an HDR setting which will automatically adjust the exposures for the three shots, but if your does not, you can make the adjustment by changing the ISO setting from perhaps 800 down to 200 for one shot and up to 3200 for the last, perhaps using the Program setting although almost any will work. Once you have the three exposures, you use image editing software to merge the images so that they are effectively laid one upon another and combined into a new image with a much increased range of detail.

The purpose of this book is to take the reader through the complete process, explaining the whys and wherefores as you go. There many examples of the finished results plus a great many screen-shots of the process at its various stages.

It is a complex procedure but one that is not impossible to master. The book goes a long way towards clarifying the process. However, although it is not a personal issue, the book is Photoshop-centric and uses that software and its tools quite extensively. It also explores and explains a number of Photoshop plug-ins, some of which are also usable with alternate image editing software. However, it is possible that alternate software may not have comparable tools and even where they do they need not operate in the same fashion. If you are not a Photoshop user, you may therefore have a problem.

From memory, the book was originally written for Photoshop CS4. CS5 is slightly different but most of its tools are used in the same way, but the various plug-ins are mostly unchanged or have seen only minor version changes. However, Photoshop CS6 has been recently released and there are supposedly several more changes made in that, although I have yet to use it and have no detailed list.

If you currently employ HDR techniques with some regularity, the book will probably be of lesser value than it would for those who have yet to try it. However, it may suggest a faster or better 'system' than that you now use.

Because it was written primarily or expressly for the Photoshop user, it may exclude others, hence the reduced rating.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This has already got me going and will keep me going for years, 9 April 2013
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
I haven't even started on the stuff on the website yet, and the book already has me out doing HDR stuff that I've never done before. The shots in the book are excellent and the insights are top notch
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5.0 out of 5 stars HDR Photography, 8 Jan 2013
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Neal Askew (Durham England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
This is the best book I've seen that explains HDR Photography. Theres a step by step guide and loads of examples to help you understand this eye catching technique.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great for your HDR workflow, 16 July 2014
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This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
I watch RC on KelbyOne and just like all their products, this is an excellent book for exploring HDR. Without this book I would not have been able to get the best out of the recommended HDR software which is vital if you are to produce quality images
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0 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish, 16 Aug 2011
This review is from: The HDR Book: Unlocking the Pros' Hottest Post-Processing Techniques (Paperback)
If you want your HDR pictures to look like they are glowing rather than natural, this is the book for you.
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