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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lightroom Lover, 20 Feb 2011
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This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
I have been using Lightroom since version 1 was first introduced and I progressed to version 2 and now use Lightroom 3 as my main "optimisation" program. I consider myself to be reasonably proficient in the use of image manipulation software and I purchased this book in order to gain an insight into the approach used by a professional photographer. I have not been disappointed as I find the guidance provided by David duChemin into how he visualises the final image and achieves that visualisation by using the tools available in Lightroom 3 to be most enlightening. His overview of the Develop Module contains many useful observations and will be of value to both the newcomer and more experienced user of the software. The detailed explanations of how he carried out the image manipulation to produce the final version for printing I found fascinating. I have no hesitation in recommending this book to the photographer who wishes to hone his skills in using the software and to gain an insight into the process of optimising a raw file to produce a truly memorable image.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why do you take Photographs?, 9 Oct 2010
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P. W. Moore (Sutherland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
If you require a nuts and bolts guide to how to use all the facilities available in Lightroom 3 then look else where. Do you need to know how to improve your workflow and how to replicate effects over many different images then this is not for you. Interested in slideshows and how to create web galleries then... kind of a pattern developing here.
The image you take on your digital SLR is what is important here and what you wish to do with it. David du Chemin opens the door and invites you to play and create, searching for what is important to you within your images. Nowhere does he say "This is what you do" but it is all about what you want do say with your image and he does explain what tools are available and how they can be used, illustrating these with 20 examples of his own work and how he achieved the end result he wanted. All in all, he asks you to think - dangerous stuff - so enjoy and see what your vision and voice have to say.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing approach to developing your photographs, 5 Sep 2010
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This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
The subtitle of this book: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom suggests that this book is only for Lightroom uses. However, the book is focused on developing images and only uses the develop module in Lightroom 3. As such the techniques will equally apply to Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS5. The screen shots are from Lightroom 3 but all the same tools are available in Photoshop CS5 Adobe Camera Raw albeit sometimes with different names and positions on the screen.

The theme of the book is refreshingly different to most other approaches to teaching Lightroom or Photoshop. David's theme running throughout the book is to have awareness of your intention for the image and this is what drives every adjustment you make.

The book can be divided into three main sections. The first five chapters seek to explore what is vision and the factors that people notice most in a photograph. This helps refine what you want from your photograph and how to emphasis the mood and draw the viewer's eye to the focal point of your vision. Next is a chapter explained in easy to follow terminology the tools and techniques available in Lightroom's develop module. This is a good refresher if you are not 100% familiar with Lightroom 3.

The bulk of the book is devoted to the methods and techniques David used on twenty actual photographs. The source files can be downloaded from the web so you can follow though the techniques step by step. It is very interesting to see David's style in action across a wide range of photographs. E.g. it is ok to make things look worse before they get better.

I rated this as four stars rather than five for two reasons. The first is that some of the full screen shots are too small and it is difficult to read the values applied to the various controls and sliders. The other reason is that output sharpening is not covered. Although David explains he uses Photoshop for this and not Lightroom and that it is not part of developing the vision sharpening does have side effects e.g. it may undo the changes you made to defocus areas to draw the viewer's eye to the areas you want them to focus. As such it would be useful to have this covered even if only as a downloadable PDF file along with the sample photographs.

In summary this is a thoroughly useful and enjoyable book and if you work though the example photographs you will definitely gain a better understanding of how to develop a photograph so that it matches your own vision and style.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Missing Link between Vision and Post Processing, 9 Aug 2010
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This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
Like David's previous books, the writing and standard of photography is very high. The book has three parts to it: A number of chapters on shooting with vision, intention and how this vision needs to be carried through to post processing, a section on David's view of the Lightroom tools and the final section has 20 of David's photographs describing his vision for them and how he carried his vision through to post. For me, the first and last parts are the most valuable, the middle part is necessary I suppose to complete the book and useful for those new to Lightroom.

The first part of the book is fantastic, a clear discussion on what vision means, why it is important and how post processing should support that vision and intent.

The last part of the book is also useful but more practical in nature and gives an insight into David's thinking both on his vision and how to express the vision in post. My only criticism in this section is he refers to the histogram quite a bit but doesn't show it in the text. However, the fact you can download his RAW files and follow through the post processing yourself is a great addition and gets over the missing histograms.

As with most PeachPit books, the standard of publication is very good. Any serious photographer will find this book of value even if you only read the first part.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Language of experience, 1 Aug 2011
This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
The ideal book to help you turn Lightroom into a creative tool.
david duchemin is a practical photographer who loves sharing his experience with others.
A must read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Continuing from where Within the Frame left off, up to expressing your Vision through your Voice using Lightroom, 22 May 2014
By 
G. Avvinti (Sicily, Italy) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
Starting your journey in practicing on how to improve your captures during post production (either just fixing little problems such as dust spots or using it as an expression mean) you might have wondered if there's something like "an optimal value for contrast or tint" and a way to determine it. You might have read technical books on a given application and while looking at an amazing processed image and reading all the parameters wisely used by the author, asking yourself: "how did he know that he had to change right that parameter and right at that value ? Is he following some undeclared yet widely known rules ? Is it a defined science ?". Of course not, or not entirely: there's (and couldn't be otherwise) some subjectivity in that, and certainly you won't process every kind of image (or even every single image) the same way. Yet, you know that, starting on the very same original picture, by combining several diverse adjustments the possible processing paths are virtually infinite, and while some resulting images will apparently seem the same at the "fit the screen" zoom level, they might qualitatively be very different soon as you magnify them.

Somewhere in this journey, it becomes clear that there's a dualism between going deeper into details to grasp further the inner working of Lightroom (in this case) and abstracting from it focusing on the very act of transitioning from "your" way to see world and life, to capture them, and finally to express them in finished images. Ideally, one should foster both. However, you face this dualism every time you pick a new book about digital image post production. In one case you will probably expose yourself to books such as Jeff Schewe's The Digital Negative: Raw Image Processing in Lightroom, Camera Raw, and Photoshop or the various works by Martin Evening (e.g. The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 Book: The Complete Guide for Photographers) and Scott Kelby (e.g. The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 Book for Digital Photographers (Voices That Matter)). Those are great works by very knowledgeable people.

In the other case you might be well satisfied with David duChemin's "Vision & Voice". To start with, it's relieving. He confesses that he goes a lot back and forth trying several adjustments, sometimes with no clear anticipated path to achieve his objective. But he stresses the importance of striving as much as you can to have a "clear objective" in what you want the image to look like in the end, what do you want to tell with it, what do you want to highlight and that must be done at the post processing stage: in short, have a clear Vision (possibly the one you had when shooting) and strive to bring the image there by exploiting Lightroom. In this schema, the book is just the proper continuation of his previous and famous effort, Within the Frame: The Journey of Photographic Vision (Voices That Matter). There's no better way to express the link between the two than using the author's words: "[...]The way you see things (vision) and the way in which you express them (voice) ...".

I found WtF very inspiring when I read it, and this book is no less, using the Vision as a trait-d'union and introducing the following important concept of Voice. DuChemin offers also a "workflow" on how to approach the development of a new image, expressed in terms of what he uses to ask himself to guide his experimentations toward the final result. Quite appropriately, he calls it a "Vision Driven Workflow" (VDW).

One caveat: the book shows now some ageing sign on the technicalities of Lightroom as it has evolved in this years and the Develop module (the one covered by duChemin here) has undergone some non negligible changes (I'm complementing it with The Digital Negative: Raw Image Processing in Lightroom, Camera Raw, and Photoshop: it's up-to-date and goes well into details of these changes). But that doesn't take away the importance of duChemin's message: strive to develop your Vision first, then use tools and craft as your Voice to express it (in this case, just adapt to new applications and algorithms but don't loose sight that they're just ... tools).

Bottom line: by all means keep investigating the intricacies of Lightroom or Photoshop or whatever other tool, Schewe/Evening/Kelby will considerably help to get the most out of them, but keep in mind that these are intended to support you in sharing your Vision. As such, Vision & Voice is, for me, an highly recommended reading.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Seems good., 4 Jan 2014
By 
David PM Young (East Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
Still trying to finish this. I tend to like books that I can just dive into, like Scott Kelby or Michael Freeman. This book is very lighthearted and witty. I have other DuChemin books and they seem to fill a gap between ultra techy and quick and dirty.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars really good book, 2 Sep 2010
This review is from: Vision and Voice: Refining Your Vision in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom (Voices That Matter) (Paperback)
What can I add to B "B"'s review above? I've just finished the book and already it's had an impact on my editing. I am still to go and download David's files to follow with the book and explore my own vision of his negatives.

If you want recipes on how to make you pictures look good, do not read this. If you want a book which makes you (re)think the way you edit your images, this book is for you, even if you do not use Adobe Photoshop Lightroom.

it makes a very nice pair with within the frame, David's first book.
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