Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent, thoughtful examination of an up-and-coming technology issue which will affect us all
Adam Greenfield's 'Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing' looks at the possibilities, opportunities and issues posed by the embedding of networked computing power and information processing in the environment, from the clichéd `rooms that recognise you and adapt to your preferences' to surveillance systems linking databases to track people's behaviour...
Published on 23 July 2006 by Dan Lockton

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars General view on ubicomp
This book is nicely done but is ageing slightly. If you know anything about ubicomp or internet of things, won't tell you anything you don't know.
Published 14 months ago by m_gv


Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent, thoughtful examination of an up-and-coming technology issue which will affect us all, 23 July 2006
This review is from: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing (Paperback)
Adam Greenfield's 'Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing' looks at the possibilities, opportunities and issues posed by the embedding of networked computing power and information processing in the environment, from the clichéd `rooms that recognise you and adapt to your preferences' to surveillance systems linking databases to track people's behaviour with unprecedented precision. The book is presented as a series of 81 theses, each a chapter in itself and each addressing a specific proposition about ubiquitous computing and how it will be used.

As a designer, my own especial interest in the subject is the 'architectures of control' that may result from pervasive everyware, and I was extremely interested to learn how Greenfield sees the control aspects of everyware panning out. He describes, in detail, the potential of different implementations of everyware for both assisting and restricting us, and fundamentally changing the way we choose (or are required) to interact with the world.

The final set of theses is a series of conditions which Greenfield believes everyware's developers and promoters must consider and adopt in order to produce the most beneficial results for civil and individual freedom.

Overall, this is a most impressive book which clearly leads the reader through the implications of ubiquitous computing, and the issues surrounding its development and deployment in a very logical style (the 'series of theses' method helps in this: each point is carefully developed from the last and there's very little need to flick between different sections to cross-reference ideas). The book's structure has been designed, which is pleasing. Everyware has provided a lot of food for thought from my point of view, and I'd recommend it to anyone with an interest in technology and the future of our society. Everyware, in some form, is inevitable, and it's essential that designers, technologists and policy-makers educate themselves right now about the issues. Greenfield's book is an excellent primer on the subject which ought to be on every designer's bookshelf.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great introduction to ubiquitous computing., 6 Feb. 2012
By 
Matthew Goddard (Southampton, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing (Paperback)
This book isn't a practical "how to" for designers, instead its job is to introduce the philosophical and ethical discussions around what ubiquitous computing will mean to all of us, designers and "users" alike.

His arguments are presented as mini-thesis's which build upon each other to give a very rounded view of the challenges we will face in designing (and using) future products and services.

In my opinion, Greenfield's writing style is perfectly suited to presenting these ideas. He's approach is balanced and there isn't even a hint of the polarised dystopian/utopian world view you often find in popular books on the future of technology.

Instead what you get is a framework for understanding your role as a designer, the role of technology and the sense that it's in all our interest for designers to care about the wider context our work exists in.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 8 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A great read if you are interested in the non technicals for the web of things. Good ideas and well written
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars General view on ubicomp, 28 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing (Paperback)
This book is nicely done but is ageing slightly. If you know anything about ubicomp or internet of things, won't tell you anything you don't know.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars It finally came, 19 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing (Paperback)
Love the book, it's in great condition and it finally arived today !!!

I love it ! Would buy again
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing
Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing by Adam Greenfield (Paperback - 10 Mar. 2006)
£21.68
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews