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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Bounty Mutiny from fo'c'sle to quarterdeck
I first read this trilogy in 1984 and the three part tale has stayed with me ever since. The personality clash between Christian and Bligh culminating in the mutiny. Bligh's incredible achievement in sailing a 23 foot open boat some 3,600 miles to safety with 19 loyal seamen. The tragic story of the party of mutineers and Tahitian men and women lead by Christain to...
Published on 8 Dec 2000 by A. J. Dean

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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven Version of the Bounty's Voyage, Mutiny and Trial
Before reviewing Mutiny on the Bounty, let me observe that it contains scenes of extreme violence against sailors in the form of corporal punishment that will nauseate sensitive readers. The violence in this book exceeds what would earn a movie an R rating. Captain Bligh's name will go down in infamy, and this novel deserves more than its share of the credit for making...
Published on 8 July 2004 by Donald Mitchell


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Bounty Mutiny from fo'c'sle to quarterdeck, 8 Dec 2000
By 
A. J. Dean (Horndean, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
I first read this trilogy in 1984 and the three part tale has stayed with me ever since. The personality clash between Christian and Bligh culminating in the mutiny. Bligh's incredible achievement in sailing a 23 foot open boat some 3,600 miles to safety with 19 loyal seamen. The tragic story of the party of mutineers and Tahitian men and women lead by Christain to their doom on Pitcairn, the world's loneliest island. The fate of those mutineers who stayed on Tahiti rather than sail with Christian only to be captured and returned to England for court-martial. I heartily recommend this volume to all as a study in human loyalty, betrayal, greed and murder.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two Epic Tales of Escape and Redemption!, 7 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
Men Against the Sea is the second book in the Bounty Trilogy. Mutiny on the Bounty recounts the tale of the voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty from England to Tahiti and a little way back, the mutiny, and the subsequent events that affect those of the Bounty's crew who remain on Tahiti. When last seen in that book, Captain William Bligh is cast adrift far from land in a small vessel overladen with 18 other loyal men and about 7 to 8 inches of freeboard above a flat sea. Practically speaking, their chances are slim.
Men Against the Sea begins with the mutiny and describes what happens to Captain Bligh and those he commands as they make their way eventually to the Dutch East Indies. Along the way, Captain Bligh and his men traverse around 3,600 miles in their fragile vessel while suffering many horrors including attacks from the native people, lack of sleep, storms, bailing for their lives, cold, thirst, too much sun, and hunger. The authors make a good decision in choosing to have the ship's surgeon serve as the narrator of this saga. This perspective made it possible for the book to include his physical descriptions of the deprivations of the Bounty's abandoned crew to help make the story more compelling. In the true spirit of a story about English tars, there is a considerable discussion of how the starvation the men experienced affected their intestinal tracts.
Captain Bligh comes across very poorly in Mutiny on the Bounty. The opposite occurs in Men Against the Sea. His leadership is one of the great accomplishments of seamanship of all time.
But the men are only human after all. Someone steals two pounds of pork. Another shipmate sent to capture birds is overcome by the need to eat them, and spoils the hunting for everyone. In their weakened state, they miss many wonderful chances for food. When they reach civilization and begin to recover from their privations, complaining quickly returns.
My test of how well written such an adventure tale is that I often felt like I was in the boat struggling with them. The main weakness of the book is that it skips many days on end, when the circumstances were at their most dire such as during unending days of storms. By doing this, the reader is denied the chance to have the full horror of the crossing bear down more strongly.
Most of the weaknesses of Mutiny on the Bounty are overcome in Men Against the Sea. So if you found that work unappealing, give this one a chance. It has many of the qualities of great survival and adventure books.
After you finish this remarkable tale, I suggest you think about the ways that adversity brings out the best in you. How can you do as well when times and circumstance are not adverse?
Squarely face the challenge, with confidence that success will follow!
Before reviewing Pitcairn's Island, let me note that it contains explicit scenes of violence that would cause this book to exceed an R rating if it were a motion picture. These scenes are very effective in enhancing the emotional power of the story, but certainly exceed what had to be portrayed.
Pitcairn's Island is by far the best of the three novels in The Bounty Trilogy. While the first two books seem like somewhat disconnected pieces of the whole story of the events leading up to and following the mutiny on H.M.S. Bounty, Pitcairn's Island stands alone as a worthy story. In its rich development of what happened to nine of the mutineers and those Polynesians who joined them, this book ranks as one of the great adventure and morality tales of all time.
The story picks up with the H.M.S. Bounty under sail in poorly charted seas, commanded by Fletcher Christian and looking for Pitcairn's Island. On the ship are 27 adults (9 British mutineers, 12 Polynesian women, and 6 Polynesian men). Everyone is a little edgy because Pitcairn's Island is not where the charts show it to be. After much stress, Pitcairn's Island is finally sighted. Then, it becomes apparent that the Bounty cannot be kept safely there in the long run because of the poor mooring conditions. If they commit to Pitcairn's Island, there will be no leaving it. What to do?
The novel follows up on what happens in the 19 years following that fateful decision. The key themes revolve around the minimum requirements of a just society, differences between the two cultures of British and Polynesians, the varying perceptions and expectations of men and women, and the impact of immorality on the health of a society. Anyone who has enjoyed Robinson Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, or The Lord of the Flies will find this novel vastly appealing. Here, part of the fascination is that real-life events are being described.
The decision to turn this into a novel is a good one. The accounts of what occurred vary, and cannot be totally reconciled. So no one can really know what happened, other than it was dramatic. Towards the end of the book, the narration becomes that of one character, and the use of that character's language, perspective, background is powerful in making the novel seem more realistic and compelling.
This is a story where the less you know when you begin, the more you will enjoy the story. To increase your potential reading pleasure, I will say no more.
After you finish reading the book, I suggest that you take each of the characters and imagine how you could have improved matters for all by speaking and behaving differently then that character did. Then, think about your own family, and apply the same thought process. Next, make a change!
Think through the long-term consequences of your potential actions very carefully when many others will be affected!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Review of Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island, 10 April 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
Men Against the Sea is the second book in the Bounty Trilogy. Mutiny on the Bounty (see my review of that book under that title) recounts the tale of the voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty from England to Tahiti and a little way back, the mutiny, and the subsequent events that affect those of the Bounty's crew who remain on Tahiti. When last seen in that book, Captain William Bligh is cast adrift far from land in a small vessel overladen with 18 other loyal men and about 7 to 8 inches of freeboard above a flat sea.
Men Against the Sea describes what happens to Captain Bligh and those he commands as they make their way eventually to the Dutch East Indies. Along the way, Captain Bligh and his men traverse around 3,600 miles in their fragile vessel while suffering many horrors including attacks from the native people, lack of sleep, storms, bailing for their lives, cold, thirst, too much sun, and hunger. The authors make a good decision in choosing to have the ship's surgeon serve as the narrator of this saga. This perspective made it possible for the book to include his physical descriptions of the deprivations of the Bounty's abandoned crew to help make the story more compelling. In the true spirit of a story about English tars, there is a considerable discussion of how the starvation the men experienced affected their intestinal tracts.
Captain Bligh comes across very poorly in Mutiny on the Bounty. The opposite occurs in Men Against the Sea. His leadership is one of the great accomplishments of seamanship of all time.
But the men are only human after all. Someone steals two pounds of pork. Another shipmate sent to capture birds is overcome by the need to eat them, and spoils the hunting for everyone. In their weakened state, they miss many wonderful chances for food. When they reach civilization and begin to recover from their privations, complaining quickly returns.
My test of how well written such an adventure tale is that I often felt like I was in the boat struggling with them. The main weakness of the book is that it skips many days on end, when the circumstances were at their most dire such as during unending days of storms. By doing this, the reader is denied the chance to have the full horror of the crossing bear down more strongly.
Most of the weaknesses of Mutiny on the Bounty are overcome in Men Against the Sea. So if you found that work unappealing, give this one a chance. It has many of the qualities of great survival and adventure books.
After you finish this remarkable tale, I suggest you think about the ways that adversity brings out the best in you. How can you do as well when times and circumstance are not adverse?
Squarely face the challenge, with confidence that success will follow!
Before reviewing Pitcairn's Island, let me note that it contains explicit scenes of violence that would cause this book to exceed an R rating if it were a motion picture. These scenes are very effective in enhancing the emotional power of the story, but certainly exceed what had to be portrayed.
Pitcairn's Island is by far the best of the three novels in The Bounty Trilogy. While the first two books seem like somewhat disconnected pieces of the whole story of the events leading up to and following the mutiny on H.M.S. Bounty, Pitcairn's Island stands alone as a worthy story. In its rich development of what happened to nine of the mutineers and those Polynesians who joined them, this book ranks as one of the great adventure and morality tales of all time.
The story picks up with the H.M.S. Bounty under sail in poorly charted seas, commanded by Fletcher Christian and looking for Pitcairn's Island. On the ship are 27 adults (9 British mutineers, 12 Polynesian women, and 6 Polynesian men). Everyone is a little edgy because Pitcairn's Island is not where the charts show it to be. After much stress, Pitcairn's Island is finally sighted. Then, it becomes apparent that the Bounty cannot be kept safely there in the long run because of the poor mooring conditions. If they commit to Pitcairn's Island, there will be no leaving it. What to do?
The novel follows up on what happens in the 19 years following that fateful decision. The key themes revolve around the minimum requirements of a just society, differences between the two cultures of British and Polynesians, the varying perceptions and expectations of men and women, and the impact of immorality on the health of a society. Anyone who has enjoyed Robinson Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, or The Lord of the Flies will find this novel vastly appealing. Here, part of the fascination is that real-life events are being described.
The decision to turn this into a novel is a good one. The accounts of what occurred vary, and cannot be totally reconciled. So no one can really know what happened, other than it was dramatic. Towards the end of the book, the narration becomes that of one character, and the use of that character's language, perspective, background is powerful in making the novel seem more realistic and compelling.
This is a story where the less you know when you begin, the more you will enjoy the story. To increase your potential reading pleasure, I will say no more.
After you finish reading the book, I suggest that you take each of the characters and imagine how you could have improved matters for all by speaking and behaving differently then that character did. Then, think about your own family, and apply the same thought process. Next, make a change!
Think through the long-term consequences of your potential actions very carefully when many others will be affected!
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review of Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island, 15 Sep 2001
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
Men Against the Sea is the second book in the Bounty Trilogy. Mutiny on the Bounty... recounts the tale of the voyage of the H.M.S. Bounty from England to Tahiti and a little way back, the mutiny, and the subsequent events that affect those of the Bounty's crew who remain on Tahiti. When last seen in that book, Captain William Bligh is cast adrift far from land in a small vessel overladen with 18 other loyal men and about 7 to 8 inches of freeboard above a flat sea.
Men Against the Sea describes what happens to Captain Bligh and those he commands as they make their way eventually to the Dutch East Indies. Along the way, Captain Bligh and his men traverse around 3,600 miles in their fragile vessel while suffering many horrors including attacks from the native people, lack of sleep, storms, bailing for their lives, cold, thirst, too much sun, and hunger. The authors make a good decision in choosing to have the ship's surgeon serve as the narrator of this saga. This perspective made it possible for the book to include his physical descriptions of the deprivations of the Bounty's abandoned crew to help make the story more compelling. In the true spirit of a story about English tars, there is a considerable discussion of how the starvation the men experienced affected their intestinal tracts.
Captain Bligh comes across very poorly in Mutiny on the Bounty. The opposite occurs in Men Against the Sea. His leadership is one of the great accomplishments of seamanship of all time.
But the men are only human after all. Someone steals two pounds of pork. Another shipmate sent to capture birds is overcome by the need to eat them, and spoils the hunting for everyone. In their weakened state, they miss many wonderful chances for food. When they reach civilization and begin to recover from their privations, complaining quickly returns.
My test of how well written such an adventure tale is that I often felt like I was in the boat struggling with them. The main weakness of the book is that it skips many days on end, when the circumstances were at their most dire such as during unending days of storms. By doing this, the reader is denied the chance to have the full horror of the crossing bear down more strongly.
Most of the weaknesses of Mutiny on the Bounty are overcome in Men Against the Sea. So if you found that work unappealing, give this one a chance. It has many of the qualities of great survival and adventure books.
After you finish this remarkable tale, I suggest you think about the ways that adversity brings out the best in you. How can you do as well when times and circumstance are not adverse?
Squarely face the challenge, with confidence that success will follow!
Before reviewing Pitcairn's Island, let me note that it contains explicit scenes of violence that would cause this book to exceed an R rating if it were a motion picture. These scenes are very effective in enhancing the emotional power of the story, but certainly exceed what had to be portrayed.
Pitcairn's Island is by far the best of the three novels in The Bounty Trilogy. While the first two books seem like somewhat disconnected pieces of the whole story of the events leading up to and following the mutiny on H.M.S. Bounty, Pitcairn's Island stands alone as a worthy story. In its rich development of what happened to nine of the mutineers and those Polynesians who joined them, this book ranks as one of the great adventure and morality tales of all time.
The story picks up with the H.M.S. Bounty under sail in poorly charted seas, commanded by Fletcher Christian and looking for Pitcairn's Island. On the ship are 27 adults (9 British mutineers, 12 Polynesian women, and 6 Polynesian men). Everyone is a little edgy because Pitcairn's Island is not where the charts show it to be. After much stress, Pitcairn's Island is finally sighted. Then, it becomes apparent that the Bounty cannot be kept safely there in the long run because of the poor mooring conditions. If they commit to Pitcairn's Island, there will be no leaving it. What to do?
The novel follows up on what happens in the 19 years following that fateful decision. The key themes revolve around the minimum requirements of a just society, differences between the two cultures of British and Polynesians, the varying perceptions and expectations of men and women, and the impact of immorality on the health of a society. Anyone who has enjoyed Robinson Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, or The Lord of the Flies will find this novel vastly appealing. Here, part of the fascination is that real-life events are being described.
The decision to turn this into a novel is a good one. The accounts of what occurred vary, and cannot be totally reconciled. So no one can really know what happened, other than it was dramatic. Towards the end of the book, the narration becomes that of one character, and the use of that character's language, perspective, background is powerful in making the novel seem more realistic and compelling.
This is a story where the less you know when you begin, the more you will enjoy the story. To increase your potential reading pleasure, I will say no more.
After you finish reading the book, I suggest that you take each of the characters and imagine how you could have improved matters for all by speaking and behaving differently then that character did. Then, think about your own family, and apply the same thought process. Next, make a change!
Think through the long-term consequences of your potential actions very carefully when many others will be affected!...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Eye opening, 21 July 2013
This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
Excellent research and very explicit in text in all three accounts. The book was finished in no time and then re-read as the pages just kept one involved in the whole event. A true masterpiece of work on this story on friendship, intrigue, breakdown of relations and restitution for the right-doers and tragedy for those who were misdirected.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven Version of the Bounty's Voyage, Mutiny and Trial, 8 July 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
Before reviewing Mutiny on the Bounty, let me observe that it contains scenes of extreme violence against sailors in the form of corporal punishment that will nauseate sensitive readers. The violence in this book exceeds what would earn a movie an R rating. Captain Bligh's name will go down in infamy, and this novel deserves more than its share of the credit for making that be the case.
H.M.S. Bounty was under assignment to go to Tahiti to secure breadfruit trees. It was hoped that these trees would grow well in the West Indies and could become a cheap source of food for slaves working there on the sugar plantations. Breadfruit trees do not have seeds, so had to be transported and transplanted to perform this experiment.
On the way to Tahiti, Captain Bligh turns out to have several weaknesses as a leader. First, he seems to have stolen food from his men in order to increase his personal income. Second, he chose to think the worst of people rather than the best, so he favored the stick over the carrot. Third, he was incautious in his speech and constantly humiliated the men under his command. No one who reads this book would want to have served under Captain Bligh. In fact, many would rename him as Captain Blight.
The weakness of the Bligh characterization is that we are given no comparison to what other British naval captains did at the same time. Was Bligh just a little worse, or twice as worse? I still don't know, and I have read a lot about this era. My impression is that what most of us would condemn was pretty typical except for the stealing from the crew's stores.
The best part of the book contains a look at Tahitian culture during this time, and the psychological experience of being falsely accused of a capital crime. Fans of trials will also enjoy the way that the court martial is portrayed. You are given even detail to appreciate the nuances of what the issues were that the various accused were dealing with.
I found that the book could have used more editing. Much of the novel could have been eliminated with no significant loss to the story. As a result, many modern readers will find that the book is very slow to get started. In a sense, the real appeal of the book begins with the mutiny about a third of the way through the book. In fact, a better structure might have been to have told most of the story of the voyage through flashback interspersed within the trip back to England and the court martial.
The sailing descriptions assume a level of knowledge about masts, sails, and wind that are well beyond my awareness of sailing. The novel would have benefited from either explaining more about these points, or eliminating most of them.
The book's final weakness is that the authors chose to use a fictional character with a unique role and no experience at sea as the narrator, rather than taking on the voice and perspective of one of the actual sailors. That choice caused the story to have a bit of a "fairy tale" quality that reduced its appeal to me.
After you have read and enjoyed this well-known book, think about where your words could wound as much or more than a whipping. Learn to measure those words carefully before you release them. In many cases, you would be better not to say them at all.
Appeal to the best in all you meet!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Order fulfilment appreciation, 1 Feb 2011
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This review is from: "Bounty" Trilogy: Mutiny on the "Bounty", Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island (Paperback)
The order placed was delivered well within the time stated, the condition of the book was excellent and the notifications of delivery etc first rate.
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