Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth The Read
Without spoiling anything, the story revolves around Yuki, a boy raised in an orphanage. Strange things begin happening around him, bizarre accidents, which culminate in him being saved by a mysterious man named Luka. Shortly after, he is adopted into the Giou family by a man claiming to be his older brother. As it turns out, the man is not his brother but part of a group...
Published on 19 Jun 2011 by Alan W

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Style of Shoujo
There's two main features of this series which drew me in. The first being the art; Hotaru Odagiri's style, at least for this series, is very like that of Matsuri Hino and Kaori Yuki, two of my favourite manga creators. It seems quite certain that Odagiri has drawn inspiration from the series' 'Vampire Knight' and 'Angel Sanctuary'. I myself own both of the 'Angel...
Published 21 months ago by Sophie Syddall


Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth The Read, 19 Jun 2011
This review is from: The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 (Paperback)
Without spoiling anything, the story revolves around Yuki, a boy raised in an orphanage. Strange things begin happening around him, bizarre accidents, which culminate in him being saved by a mysterious man named Luka. Shortly after, he is adopted into the Giou family by a man claiming to be his older brother. As it turns out, the man is not his brother but part of a group called the Zweilt Guardians who are the reincarnations of past spirits, and Yuki is one of them.

The main problem with this story is the main character. If you're familiar with the term Mary-Sue, then you'll probably agree that this term applies to Yuki. He's flawlessly good, endlessly kind and everyone loves him. Even characters who initially don't love him will within a chapter or two. This is explained in the story as being due to whatever relationships their original incarnations had, but honestly, that explanation seems to fall a little short. Many people I've spoken to have been put off by the main character, deeming him far too goody-goody, and I'd have to agree. He's unrealistic to the extreme.

However, despite this shortcoming, there are plenty of reasons to still read the series. Number one is definitely the other characters. Yuki aside, the other Zweilt Guardians are fascinating characters, with complex relationships with one another. Hotsuma and Shuusei are reason enough to read the series, in my opinion, their story both heartbreaking and heartwarming. Another reason is simply the artwork. It's beautiful and detailed, and symbolism is used a lot in the art, making it all the more interesting. Then there's the actual plot which, while not particularly original (two groups fighting, one to save the world, the other to destroy, to strip it to nuts and bolts) is still engaging enough to keep your interest.

So, over all, it's definitely worth the read. It's not a series that will have you contemplating philosophy or anything, but it's certainly a good way to pass the time. A little warning, however; there are a lot of shounen-ai/boys love undertones to the series, due to the fact that some of the original incarnations were lovers and they haven't all reincarnated in their original gender. Luka and Yuki particularly, since it's explicitly shown that Luka and the original Yuki were lovers, and Luka's dedication to protecting Yuki does have its implications. If you're very against shounen-ai, this is not a series for you. If it doesn't bother you, however, read it. It's worth it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Style of Shoujo, 18 Oct 2012
By 
Sophie Syddall "PockyCrumbs" (Cambridgeshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 (Paperback)
There's two main features of this series which drew me in. The first being the art; Hotaru Odagiri's style, at least for this series, is very like that of Matsuri Hino and Kaori Yuki, two of my favourite manga creators. It seems quite certain that Odagiri has drawn inspiration from the series' 'Vampire Knight' and 'Angel Sanctuary'. I myself own both of the 'Angel Sanctuary' Art Books and all of the illustrations for 'The Betrayal Knows my name' look like they were drawn with these art books propped up in front of the artist. They use similar poses, themes and colours; chains, bondage in red ribbons and white bandages, Gothic jewelery, open militaristic shirts and etc.

The influences from 'Vampire Knight' might even be stronger in some images. Odagiri's illustrations, constantly, place the characters in variations of black-and-white uniforms that often look startlingly close to that of Cross Academy. The white uniforms have similar black stitching and there are even silver rose-shaped buttons and motifs in some pictures.

This may sound like an odd point to begin critiquing the series on but the aesthetics are too striking not to mention at length. There was one illustration in particular which was so reminiscent of 'Vampire Knight' that I wondered whether it wandered into the realms of outright copying. I couldn't find an image that was exactly the same though, when I checked through 'Vampire Knight.'

I personally don't mind the cannibalistic nature of manga and anime too much, provided it does not fall into the category of undeniable plagiarism, and it was the artistic similarities which drew me to the series. I was curious about what kind of story this author had created, given her obvious artistic influences.

The second reason I was drawn to this series was also an aesthetic one, and one many will consider very shallow - but this is a large manga volume. I cannot help but be more inclined to consider any manga which is published, or becomes published, in a tall, thick edition compiling more than one of the usual manga volumes. It's value for money, it's particularly nice as a collector's piece, and it's just basically more satisfying to read from a fat, meaty manga omnibus.

It seems that the volumes for 'The Betrayal Knows My Name' comprise two of the standard Japanese volumes but, unlike most omnibus editions, it does not specifically state this. Presumably this is because the series has only ever been published in this format, there is no need to state that volume 1 technically contains volume 1 and 2.

Having been seduced into buying the first volume through its presentation I found the story reasonably appealing. I would say that it is more accessible than Kaori Yuki's works but not as smooth in narration as Matsuri Hino's top series.

The story revolves around Yuki, a young orphan boy with mysterious powers who, it is revealed, belongs to a clan of demon hunters. Every member of the clan is reincarnated after they die but they lose all their memories of their previous life in the process. Yuki's most recent incarnation was that of a woman and he had a lover, Luka, who was a demon turned traitor against his own kind. Luka continues to serve as Yuki's fighting partner in this life and works hard to protect him.

It is important to note that my explanation is designed to be as simple as possible and that the term 'demon' is not generally used in the series at all. Instead the manga, like so many, spurns the obvious terms for things and invents its own unestablished ones. These sound German in tone but I assume, automatically, that they are completely made-up. The clan of demon-fighters refer to themselves as 'Zweilt' and the demons are catagorized, depending upon their rank, into 'Duras' and 'Opasts' and etc.

I personally don't like the way the words sound and would have prefered it if they merely said things such as 'powerful demon' or called their clan after a distinct concept that could be translated such as, 'Lightbringers.'

The pacing tends to vary throughout the series, sometimes being more slow and reflective, and sometimes more hectic and a little confusing. Upon finishing the first volume I was uncertain whether the rest of the series would be worth reading since there was a lot of fight scenes which, lacking in interesting opponents or background interaction, were quite dull.

In the following volumes, however, the conflicts became much more interesting as the demons tended to each have their own identity and found their way into the human world in a variety of ways. The episodes had more of the flavor of classic Japanese urban ghost stories, providing colour and interest. For instance, in one story the clan is attracted by a mysterious set of disappearances all revolving around a bizarre craze of 'love spells' among high school students.

There is also, as the series progresses, a great deal of background given around the other members of the clan and their connections. The clan members each have a 'partner' to whom they are bound and fight alongside and the relationships between each of these pairs varies and provides intrigue. Odagiri keeps introducing new, previously unseen, members of the clan throughout the series too, securing attention from the reader with antisocial artists and teen idols.

The shonen-ai element of the series are most present in these quirky partner relationships, since almost all members of the clan are male. The emphasis is entirely upon emotion though rather than physical intimacy though so fans looking for outright romance might be unsatisfied. The most frequent manifestations of affection come in patterns of angst, comfort and flashbacks to childhood. I personally find these very enjoyable though and appreciate the style.

The main problem with the characters is that so many of Odagiri's designs look very similar and since there are so many bishonen members of the flipping 'Zweilt' if I am not immediately reminded of their defining character traits then I cannot recognize them. What's more since so many of the characters are defined by their particular relationship to their partner then if they appear in a scene not interacting with said partner then I am unable to distinguish who they are.

The title of this series 'The Betrayal Knows My Name' is obviously a terrible translation and a grammatical nightmare but there is a reason for it in the story. It is explained that if a 'Zess' class demon reveals its name to another then that person will become their 'master.' In the beginning of the series Luka goes simply by the alias 'Zess' rather than a name before revealing his true name to Yuki who he considers to be his master.

This explanation of a 'supernatural contract' would be quite interesting and good if only the idea of the name being a 'secret' was handled more delicately. Since knowing a demon's name gives one power over them then it should stand to reason that Yuki should only call him this in private but once 'Zess' reveals his true name everyone calls him Luka at all times - including screaming it out in front of enemies!

It may be that I am miss-understanding the nature of the 'name bond' but the explanations given are never very in-depth or clear. It's one of the more disappointing elements of the storyline but otherwise the series is relatively strong and engaging.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sucked in, well and truely!, 9 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 (Paperback)
When people put ‘I was sucked in’ in reviews, I never truly believed them till now. But just like the anime (which follows the manga closely) I am totally won over.

YAOI? (cos it’s a question I like answered) Weeell, I’m not sure there will be anything graphic, it’s kinda implied. A lot. But we are dealing with a few teens and beings that are a few centuries old, reincarnations not withstanding. But we can hope!

The art work is very pretty, the story line thus far just keeps me salivating for more cos I reeealy need to know what’s going on!!
The story is also quite dark in places, dealing a lot with parental abandonment in one form or another.
Also for those of us who don’t like ‘high school manga plots’ (Me included) this isn’t a problem here, school is practically an afterthought and isn’t getting in the way of plot.
There isn’t a chara I don’t like, not a one. Which is strange cos there is usually always one you want the author to kill off, but I’m on the 3rd volume and haven’t fond a one yet. But with 3 more to go, who knows. But I’m enjoying getting there.

AND, if you weren’t already convinced to buy… Ok, these books are NOT cheep, about the price of some hard yaoi, which we arnt getting… BUT… these are double volumes, slightly larger than a normal manga book, and double as thick, they are also printed on good thick paper. (Seriously when I got mine I was a happy puddle of otaku goo… and they smell really nice too! ^_~)

So go check out the first very pretty volume… but be prepared to buy the rest… I’m currently waiting for the last few volumes!

Enjoy!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars would recommend, 15 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 (Paperback)
wow, not what i was expecting, really enjoyed it. sadness, humor and mystery found by the end wanting to see more, so bought the book to find the ending [WHICH IM STILL READING] loved it
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars <3 ^^, 16 Sep 2011
This review is from: The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 (Paperback)
Love this book its great and I dont think that Yuki is too nice as it's the whole point of his character he needs to be nice or it wouldn't work the same. I thoroughly enjoyed this book the book is beautifully drawn and I have even managed to convince others who previously didn't like manga that it is amazing with the aid of this book. Well worth a read and I can't wait for the next one to come out in English.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 24 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 (Paperback)
I was happy with this item.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1
The Betrayal Knows My Name: Vol 1 by Hotaru Odagiri (Paperback - 14 Jun 2011)
10.14
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews