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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read
There are a lot of good things about this book. Kirby, in particular, is beautifully observed. I also like the fact that Marian isn't always that sympathetic; there are far too many books where the main character is just too perfect. Plus the pacing and plotting are very well done - the story zips along. Unfortunately, Where We Belong is let down by the secondary...
Published 22 months ago by happy1

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly lacking 3 .5 stars
Despite having a couple of Emily Giffin's books on my tbr pile, this is the first I have actually read. I always think the synopsis' sound really intriguing and this was no exception. I also really like the covers of Emily's books - really simple but they work.

This book follows Kirby and Marian. The story is told from their alternate viewpoints and it really...
Published 22 months ago by C. Rucroft


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read, 22 Sep 2012
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
There are a lot of good things about this book. Kirby, in particular, is beautifully observed. I also like the fact that Marian isn't always that sympathetic; there are far too many books where the main character is just too perfect. Plus the pacing and plotting are very well done - the story zips along. Unfortunately, Where We Belong is let down by the secondary characters who are disappointingly one dimensional. Both Conrad and Philip are too flawless to be believable. Neither is it plausible that Marian's father would be willing to spend almost twenty years pretending that he didn't know about the baby. Still, the book is well crafted and worth a read. Three and a half stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly lacking 3 .5 stars, 18 Sep 2012
By 
C. Rucroft "The little bookworm" (North Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
Despite having a couple of Emily Giffin's books on my tbr pile, this is the first I have actually read. I always think the synopsis' sound really intriguing and this was no exception. I also really like the covers of Emily's books - really simple but they work.

This book follows Kirby and Marian. The story is told from their alternate viewpoints and it really works for this story. We also get a lot of backstory, which is necessary for the tale to 'work.' I liked all the characters and felt huge amounts of sympathy for Marian. I don't want to give much away as it will ruin the story but it was a great topic for a book.

There was absolutely nothing wrong with the book, so why did I give it three and a half stars? It just lacked something for me. I felt it should have gone 'deeper' into what happened and it just seemed to 'gloss' over it.

I still enjoyed it and read it in a few days. I would read another of the author's work.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Sigh, 25 Jun 2013
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
I used to like this author. Not so much anymore... I miss her writing stle in Something Borrowed and Something Blue. Has she lost her mojo? I hope not!
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of GIffin's best, 24 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Where We Belong (Paperback)
I've read all of Emily Giffin's books, she's one of the few writers and I continually check amazon for to see if she has anything new coming out. This doesn't disappoint and I think may be one of her best. Giffin's ability to show both character's viewpoints and side of the story is spot on as usual and you really do empathise with them both. I couldn't put this down; funny, touching and very well written. Highly recommend.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down, 24 Aug 2012
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
I had been waiting for this book for months and months, and it was well worth it! I loved both of the main characters so much and enjoyed their back stories as well as what was happening in the present.
I would very much like a sequel. Another top read from Ms Giffin.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A bit too unrealistic- oh, and a little Pro-Lifey, 25 Oct 2012
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
I have not read any other books by this author and appoached it with fresh eyes, as it were.
On the whole I enjoyed the pacing and storyline of this book, although it's not something I would normally read. It's an interesting premise.
The two main female characters of Kirby and Marion were well drawn and likeable, and it romped along at a good pace. I have to agree with some previous reviewers that some of the main male characters and Kirby's adoptive parents required a little more dimension, and also that at times it felt as though I was reading a Young Adult book.
I was somewhat annoyed by the oh-so-neat-and-tidy ending, where everybody's happy and it's all ever so lovely. Not that I'm opposed to happy endings- on the contrary- but it just seemed so sugary, and dare I say, a little dumbed-down.
The main thing that irritated me was the Pro-life moralizing, which seems to be repeated throughout the book. It was not blatant, but it was certainly there. I am definitely not anti-baby or anti-pregnancy, but it was so consistent- the fact that Marion's father, after secretly knowing she had a baby for all those years, stated that he wouldn't have minded what she did as long as she had the baby and did not abort it. And very unrealistic that he kept his knowledge from her, I might add.
It's that old, old moralistic adage of the fact that girls who do "bad" things deserve what happens to them. If Marion had not submitted to her natural urges and gone from "good girl" to "bad girl", none of the heartache would ever have occurred. Also, the way she got pregnant was a bit ridiculous- terrible luck, there, Marion, that'll learn ya! (Sarcasm coming up, sorry)- in this case Marion is excused slightly by the fact that she sort of knew her sexual partner and then went on to have an intense emotional relationship with him. That gives her just enough moral ground for us to be able to empathise with her for the rest of the book.But not much, apparently, going by her empty, sterile but glamorous life, proving that hard work, a sterling career a fabulous apartment and a gorgeous partner don't add up to much in the way of spiritual fulfillment.
Heaven forbid that a woman or girl should do what they want with their body and not be told what to do with it or think about it by their society, church, social group, husband, government, or whatever.The very idea that women's bodies actually belong to them- don't be silly, dear!
Equally silly was the idea that she had an extemely close relationship with Conrad and then shut down the moment she found out she was pregnant, despite his protestations of support.And, as other reviews have stated, his reaction upon finding out what she kept from him 18 years later. I feel that much more should have been explored in this book about the brushed-over ideas of social snobbery between different socio-economic groups in America and the short- and long-term effects of lying, plus a little bit more about the impact of adoption on the adoptee and their family.Or maybe I'm just being too heavy and should just view it as an entertaining read, which it was.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 24 Aug 2012
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This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
I've been a fan of Emily Giffin for a little while now, since I picked up Heart of The Matter. I was very excited when I pre-orderd this new book however, I've been left very disappointed.
The story is about a young woman that gives up her daughter for adoption, 18 years later after becoming a successful TV producer her daughter turns up on her door step. There is little emotion between the mother and daughter like I would have expected, nor that of the adoptive parents.

I understand that Emily has tried to capture the life of her younger character Kirby, but I felt like I have been reading a book for teens rather than a adult, and I ended up feeling frustrated and bored. If you are a fan of Emily by all means read this, but don't spend hardback cover money on it because sadly this story is not worth it.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another great read from Emily Giffin, 6 Aug 2012
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
I find Emily Giffin one of the most consistent & interesting chick lit writers around. I have loved all of her books & really enjoyed this one too. It's easy reading but with more to it than the average book. Would be a great beach read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Successful book on a difficult subject, 19 Sep 2012
By 
Shouna Falconer (U.K.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Where We Belong (Hardcover)
I've read all of Emily Giffin's books, and to begin with I thought I was going to be disappointed with this one. I didn't immediately develop a liking for either of the main characters, who seemed uninspiring compared with Rachel, Tessa and (in "Something Blue" at any rate)even Darcy. To begin with my reaction was of the "so what!" variety and I couldn't really bring myself to care about what happened to anyone. But just short of halfway through, everything changed and I started to become engrossed as things developed from a slow start. Looking back I see that the bland beginning wss necessary for the pacing to work and for the difficult subject of adoption to be properly dealt with.

The structure of the novel is similar to that of her last book in that the narrative switches between the two main characters - Marian, who had a baby at the age of 18 and put her up for adoption, and that "baby" who, at the age of 18, sets out to find her natural mother. Both their back stories are deftly interweaved with the present and their developing relationship moves along nicely. The main theme of the novel is an exploration of how secrets can tear a person apart and impact on everyone else.

Interestingly, the story starts with Marian wanting a baby at the age of 36, while her boyfriend of two years remains uncertain, even about marriage. Readers of previous books may recall that "Baby Proof" began with a couple in disagreement over whether or not to have a child, Claudia being set against it, while her husband had suddenly developed a longing for one. An age old theme, no doubt done many times, but in my opinion this book is much better than "Baby Proof", which is my least favourite of Emily Giffin's books.

The two main characters are supported by a strong cast of relatives and friends and the result is a really good read. The only thing I found less good about it was that it contained many more American references than usual. There were several times when I had to stop and ponder, and then shrug and move on when something puzzled me. It's never been a problem in the past, but this time, a glossary of terms would have been helpful, given that her books are sold in the U.K. as well as in the U.S.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 23 Oct 2012
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This review is from: Where We Belong (Kindle Edition)
Emily doesn't disappoint I really liked this book and its now my 2 nd fave of hers! I'd recommend to anyone to read her books!
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Where We Belong
Where We Belong by Emily Giffin (Paperback - 16 April 2013)
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