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44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Action, adventure, intrigue- All of Under The Eagle and more
If you thought Under The Eagle was a good read, you're in for a real treat. The Eagles Conquest follows directly on from the first book without breaking stride. Macro, Cato, the rest of the sixth century, second legion and their commander Vespasian are hurled into battles and confrontations both with the sword and with political intrigue. The Britons proove formidable...
Published on 24 Aug. 2001

versus
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Book Like an Espisode of a Saturday Morning Cartoon
I had high hopes for this book. As an avid history buff, I have enjoyed Bernard Cornwell's accounts of the latter years of Britain and had hoped for some more of the same sort of writing with Simon Scarrow.

Unfortunately, the two are incomparable. Simon's novel starts out feeling a bit like an 80s US Army boot camp kind of film, then morphs into feeling like a...
Published on 3 Oct. 2010 by Histo Ry buff


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44 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Action, adventure, intrigue- All of Under The Eagle and more, 24 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Hardcover)
If you thought Under The Eagle was a good read, you're in for a real treat. The Eagles Conquest follows directly on from the first book without breaking stride. Macro, Cato, the rest of the sixth century, second legion and their commander Vespasian are hurled into battles and confrontations both with the sword and with political intrigue. The Britons proove formidable opponents to the might of Rome while the eminently hissable villain Vitellius plots and schemes towards his own ambitious ends. Along the way is murder, deception and even an attempt on the life of the Emperor himself. The book carries off the gritty feel of Roman military life with great aplomb, the established characters are human enough to almost be real, and the story flows effortlessly on both the action and political levels. When most follow up books are mere shadows of the original, this one outshines it's predecessor. It's an exciting page turner that I could not put down until the very last page.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Battles, conspiracy and then some, 14 April 2006
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Paperback)
The second in the series follows the legions of Claudius from their beachhead near Rutupiae to the battles on the Medway, Thames and before Camulodunum (Colchester). It moves at a great pace making use of several plot threads to keep tension high. As before, the main characters, Cato and Centurion Macro, unify all the threads from the terror and exultation of battle through the politics of military strategy to the machinations of conspiracy.

Scarrow does battles extremely well, if always at the service of plot. Confusion never lasts long; the reader always knows what part the detail plays in the whole picture. The fight is not clean, but it is clear, and Scarrow is able to draw out the action so that every battle has its own arc and could be extracted and read for itself.

Cato is seen to grow in this book. The action in the first was dominated by his need to prove himself; here, though his part is often heroic, he must also come to terms with helplessness and the aftermath of slaughter. His infatuation with the slavegirl, Lavinia, continues and plays a part in the machinations of Vitellius to assassinate the Emperor. Cato is decisive at the denouement of this conspiracy, but Scarrow does not allow him to take the hero's palm - a sign that the book is a little more than a boys' own adventure.

There is, as well, another point of view for Cato to understand and absorb: that of the conquered. Nisus is a surgeon and from North Africa, not only Carthaginian but a direct descendent of Hannibal! He voices the opinion that some might not be grateful for the benefits of Roman civilisation, that they might have been happier as they were. We're not told what Cato makes of this, and Nisus is soon involved in grand conspiracy. It is not clear if the seditious sentiments he uttered were merely a ploy by the author to justify the character's eventual treachery, or if they portend an important theme for the other books. I was a little surprised by the inclusion of these thoughts; they interrupted the flow of the narrative in what might have been an interesting way.

The prose does not hold you up. Nouns have immediate call on their tabloid adjective: "crush the enemy in an iron vice; deadly efficiency; an icy dread; bleak despair; the ruthless efficiency of vigorous training; the grim reality of their predicament". At times he feels the need to make use of every note taken during research - as a boat moors, who throws every rope to whom for it to be tied to every mooring post. However, these are small faults in a fast-moving narrative set in an exotic Britain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Triumph!, 30 Jan. 2014
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Paperback)
The perfect gift for all Roman history enthusiasts is THE ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKERCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker
The second in the series does not disappoint, Simon scarrow's story telling goes from strength to strength, the narrative is fast paced with excellent sub plots full of intrigue and political machinations and dry humour combined with visceral and gritty battle scenes, so vivid you are there amongst the action.

The authors main protagonists characterisations are three dimensional so much so that you feel you know them.
All in all a well written and researched novel. Highly recommended

The perfect companion to the Eagle series is the Roma Victrix wine beakerCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker
Simon in his review says.
beautifully sculpted it is a very handsome thing! the reason why i particularly like this cup is that it features the men and insignia of the second legion, the unit in which cato learned how to become a soldier under the affectionate eye of macro! it's a lovely thing and has pride of place on my desk right now
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Second book in a Great Series, 28 Dec. 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The author, Simon Scarrow teaches at a leading Sixth Form College. He has run a Roman History programme taking parties of students to a number of ruins and museums across Britain. This is the first in a series of books about Quintus Licinius Cato, Optio (second in command) to Macro a centurion and veteran of more than one campaign in the Roman legions.

Centurion Macro and his Optio (second in command) Quintus Licinius Cato have arrived in Britain as part of the Emperor Claudius's invasion force in AD43. The Roman army are easily outnumbered by the local natives, so it is essential that the Roman's engage the enemy before they have a chance to grow strong enough to overwhelm the legions.

However the Britons are not the only danger facing Macro and Cato. An organisation opposed to the Emperor is secretly betraying the Legions and when rumours of an assassination plot coincide with Claudius arriving on British soil, the soldiers know that they are up against a force much more dangerous the British.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From strength to strength, 13 Dec. 2013
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Paperback)
Simon Scarrow has penned an exciting narrative with historical fact and fiction expertly interwoven, gritty action, three dimensional Characters, and a vivid sense of the times. Highly recommended.
For those who would like further information on this epoch I highly recommend the OSPREY Campaign, Warrior, and men at arms booklets, with great overviews, excellent illustrations, and highly detailed maps.

The perfect companion to the Eagle series is the Roma Victrix wine beakerCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker,
Simon in his review says.
BEAUTIFULLY SCULPTED IT IS A VERY HANDSOME THING! THE REASON WHY I PARTICULARLY LIKE THIS CUP IS THAT IT FEATURES THE MEN AND INSIGNIA OF THE SECOND LEGION, THE UNIT IN WHICH CATO LEARNED HOW TO BECOME A SOLDIER UNDER THE AFFECTIONATE EYE OF MACRO! IT'S A LOVELY THING AND HAS PRIDE OF PLACE ON MY DESK RIGHT NOW
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best in the series, 11 Jun. 2011
By 
Parm (A bookshop near you) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Hardcover)
This was even better than Simon Scarrow's first book - and that's some achievement!
This time around Cato and Macro are ranged against the Britons, desperately defending their homeland in a series of pitched battles. The battle scenes are something else and carry the reader right into the heart of the bloody conflict so that somehow the author manages to make you see, hear, smell and feel the terrified combatants.

The characters are wonderful creations and smack of real living and breathing people complete with all their faults. Heroes try hard to be heroic, and sometimes fail. Villains seem to know no limit to their evil plotting. If ever there was a novel crying out to be filmed or made into a TV series then this is it.

if thes series keeps improving like this we will see Simon on the best seller lists in no time.
(Parm)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Roman Military Page-turner as the author intended, 7 Dec. 2013
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I didn't think I'd enjoy a military book but Simon Scarrow packs enough suspense into his books for me to enjoy them nevertheless and soak up some history to boot. Macro & Cato's characters are engaging and disparate which makes their interactions interesting. Not too heavyweight but engaging and I find the books (& this one in particular) as thrilling as anything Lee Child has to offer.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolute corker!, 5 Aug. 2001
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Hardcover)
This book follows on from the first in the series, 'Under The Eagle'. Too often the follow up fails to deliver the promise of the first book.NOT so in this case.In 'Eagles Conquest' the story is picked up seamlessly with Cato and Macro off again on a series of adventures during the invasion of first century Britain. Mr Scarrow has developed his characters well, added an utterly gripping storyline, and overlaid it with his obvious thorough knowledge of the history of the period. The end result is a breathtaking gallop from beginning to end, which left me gasping for more. If you like first rate historical adventures - then this is as good as it get ! Thoroughly recommended, but be sure to read 'Under The Eagle' first. I predict that Cato and Macro will soon be storming the ramparts of the bestseller lists ! - Bernard Cornwell should be a worried man. Excellent !!!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant! Even better than Under The Eagle!, 2 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Hardcover)
Having read through Scarrow's first novel in one sitting, and being utterly gripped by the experience, I must admit that I had worries that the sequel would not match the quality of the first book in what must become a series. The Eagle's Conquest is a fast-moving, intoxicating read. The battles are spectacular, gritty and excitingly credible. I felt I could smell and touch the events as they happened. The characters from the first novel are nicely advanced and Vitellius is becoming a compulsively attractive villain. Cato continues to charm the reader with his efforts to become what he thinks a soldier should be. Centurion Macro looks on with a touching fatherly bemusement and Vespasian struggles to advance his military career in the face of determined British resistance. What makes these novels stand out from the rest is the compelling sense of time and place, and the way the heroes are recognisably human and prone to make as many mistakes as right decisions. I also like the intricate plotting that keeps several narrative threads on the boil at the same time. It all comes to a head beautifully with a nail-biting climax that is as horrifying as it is touching. My only complaint is that I will now have to wait another bloody year before the next Eagle novel comes out!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Book Like an Espisode of a Saturday Morning Cartoon, 3 Oct. 2010
This review is from: The Eagle's Conquest (Paperback)
I had high hopes for this book. As an avid history buff, I have enjoyed Bernard Cornwell's accounts of the latter years of Britain and had hoped for some more of the same sort of writing with Simon Scarrow.

Unfortunately, the two are incomparable. Simon's novel starts out feeling a bit like an 80s US Army boot camp kind of film, then morphs into feeling like a Saturday morning cartoon, before eventually ending like an Austin Powers film - with a villain detailing his whole evil plot at the moment of expected climax.

The result is a novel that is undeveloped, cliche, immature, and not placed at all in the era you expect. A good historical author takes into account contemporary language and culture into the story, but this author has just focused instead on the events. It makes the whole era seem like it was just lived 20 years ago, instead of 2,000 years ago.

If you want a good historical account, stick to the greats. Simon Scarrow is not one of those.
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The Eagle's Conquest
The Eagle's Conquest by Simon Scarrow (Hardcover - Dec. 2002)
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