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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant, pin-point specific book, and a POWERFUL tool.
When you see the title of this book, you are at some point going to be sceptical - and rightly so. Obviously, just buying the thing isn't going to stop you being lied to, and nor is reading it. Take the information in, though, and choose to use it, and I am convinced that you will have quite extrordinary results.
In a way it's relief to say that I have used only a...
Published on 4 Aug 2002

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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book makes too many claims without supporting evidence.
I am a communication scholar, and study deception. I believe readers will be offended when they learn the book makes cites NO references or studies to support the claims advanced. Has this advice ever been tested? The image of deception portrayed is far too simplistic and may do more harm than good. For example, Lieberman does not address reasons for lying, individual...
Published on 25 Oct 1998


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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book makes too many claims without supporting evidence., 25 Oct 1998
By A Customer
I am a communication scholar, and study deception. I believe readers will be offended when they learn the book makes cites NO references or studies to support the claims advanced. Has this advice ever been tested? The image of deception portrayed is far too simplistic and may do more harm than good. For example, Lieberman does not address reasons for lying, individual and cultural differences, or ways we encourage lies in our relationships. Studies demonstrate that we are terrible lie detectors, often doing no better than chance alone. Unfortunately, this book may give people false confidence and create strained relationships, a loss of trust, etc. Lieberman assumes that knowing the truth is always beneficial. However, people lie primarily for pro-social reasons and to protect hurt feelings. If Lieberman believes lying is wrong, why does he advocate lying to get at "truth"? A much more useful and credible book for the general public is Ekman's "Telling Lies". Another is Cialdini's "Influence" in that it explains how we are persuaded, rather than promoting paranoia about normal behavior. A more complex book is "Deceptive Communication" by Miller and Stiff.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant, pin-point specific book, and a POWERFUL tool., 4 Aug 2002
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Never be Lied to Again (Paperback)
When you see the title of this book, you are at some point going to be sceptical - and rightly so. Obviously, just buying the thing isn't going to stop you being lied to, and nor is reading it. Take the information in, though, and choose to use it, and I am convinced that you will have quite extrordinary results.
In a way it's relief to say that I have used only a tiny percentage of the material, and therefore cannot say everything works like magic... It remains the case, however, that the occassions on which these realistic and simple techniques were applied, they were incredibly effective.
There is only one reservation to state! SOME of the principles would be considered dubious, if used in a professional setting... Running through one or two scenarios, I found myself hesitant about applying such strong psychological pressure on an employee. Employment law would, I think, not allow for a few of the more intense methods.
The fact that this reservation does not prevent my giving five stars ought say something about the rest. Buy the book, Be lied to again... and know not only that you have been, but also how to deal with the situation.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Swiss Army Knife Of Lie Detection, 26 Aug 2000
By A Customer
Andy Blackwell, Board Governor and Fellow of the Institute of Professional Investigators, reviews David J Lieberman's book 'Never Be Lied To Again'
Getting the truth in five minutes or less in any conversation or situation is one skill no doubt all professional investigators would dearly love to perfect. David J Lieberman, a specialist in the field of human behaviour (who is also a board-certified hypnotherapist with a Ph.D. in psychology) makes this claim in his fascinating book 'Never Be Lied To Again'.
David focuses on the truth and how to get at it. His book is divided into eight parts, each of which explores in depth a facet of lying. The author claims that the techniques mentioned in the book will assist you to discover whether you're being lied to.
The author commences his work by explaining that there are at least forty-six clues to deception. Whilst some of these involve the fundamentals of body language, others use more advanced techniques and processes such as psycholinguistic emphasis and neural choice perception.
A specific game plan to detect deceit is also provided and involves the reader choosing from a variety of scripted sequences, each from a different psychological angle. Each script provides a primer, attack sequence, and 'silver bullets' (techniques designed to obtain a confession).
Tactics for detecting deceit and gathering information in casual conversations are also given. These are useful when you believe that someone is lying to you but circumstances preclude a full interrogation.
A section entitled 'Mind Games' includes details of two simple techniques that the author claims provide 'extraordinary' results. The first technique shows you how to avoid being lied to in the first place, whilst the second teaches you how to find a person's true intention in any situation.
Lieberman provides a 'Ten Commandments of Human Behaviour' as a means of demonstrating to the reader how the brain processes information. An understanding of which, he claims, will enable us to influence anyone to tell the truth.
Not only are lie-detection methods admirably explained in this book, but also the internal truth blockers that can interfere with, or even completely block our ability to detect deceit.
The advanced techniques described in the book are based on a blend of hypnosis and 'Trance Scripts' developed by Lieberman, and are intended to be used in situations where the interviewer is trying to persuade the 'subject' to tell the truth.
Investigators practising in the UK need to ensure that any actions they take are not deemed to be oppressive or 'unfair', as this may render evidence inadmissible in criminal proceedings. Forensic hypnosis is strictly controlled in the UK, therefore the use of some of the advanced techniques mentioned in Lieberman's book is unlikely to meet Home Office Guidelines on the subject. The author sensibly includes the following warning to readers: 'To those in law enforcement: make sure that you check appropriate federal and state laws regarding both interviewing and interrogation. Those in the private sector must use common sense when using the system'.
Lieberman's book is the 'Swiss Army Knife' of Lie Detection Techniques for investigators, a fascinating insight into human behaviour at its worst. Whilst local laws may preclude the use of some of the methods described in the book, others can be used quite freely and will no doubt be particularly useful for professional investigators.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is a club with an exploding handle., 1 Nov 1998
By A Customer
This book appeals to the credulous by encouraging the reader's belief that he or she can reliably detect and expose lies. Unfortunately, this belief is simply false. (See, for example, David Lykken's Tremor in the Blood.) Moreover, in hands naive or reckless enough to put the author's principles into practice, the results are certain to be more harmful than helpful. The book inspires a cynical outlook on one's relations with others and cynical means for exposing them. Following its principles will lead to one's being avoided if not despised by one's associates. It isn't worth it.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This book is scary, 24 July 1998
By A Customer
Mark my words: this book is going to change the way people relate to each other--for the better. I would have given it five stars but I took one away because to some degree it shows people how to become better at lying. I know this wasn't the intention of the book, but it does this nonetheless.
Overall the book is truly astounding. The techniques are not just common sense advice, they use proven, practical systems for lie detection. What I found most surprising is just how fast you can tell if you're being lied to. It really does take only two to three minutes.
There's a section called MIND GAMES and an other called ADVANCED TECHNIQUES. Check these out first, they work for me almost every single time.
And a fun read too. It's not dry at all. The book is broken down into many sections so you can learn something new every couple of pages.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I owe this book my life . . ., 16 July 1999
By A Customer
I recommend this book to anyone that fears that he or she may be in a relationship with someone who is cheating or lying. You can argue with the morality of the methods but you can't argue with their effectiveness. These techniques work just about every time and I can't tell you how much better I feel about myself knowing that I'm not be taken advantage of anymore. There is no worse feeling then being with someone who has been playing you for a fool for two and a half years. It took me about ten minutes to do three techniques on him. He failed all three and then an hour later told me the truth. I owe my life to this book. Read it and use it everyday of your life. I will.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Reading this book is the safest way to lose all your friends, 5 Sep 1998
By A Customer
I have friends who do not like to look me in the eye. Are they always lying to me? I have friends who never express emotion but remain composed at all times. Should I begin to feel suspicious? And just about some of my friends happen to favor a body posture that this book classifies as that of a liar, should I stop believing everything they say?
And suppose that I stop being honest to all my friends who fall within the three categories above, that is, the majority of my friends. Suppose that I begin to lie to them in hope of uncovering the lies that I suspect they have been telling me. ARE THEY FOOLS TO NOT CALL MY LIE? AM I SMARTER THAN THEM TO FOOL THEM? WILL THEY WANT TO BE MY FRIENDS AFTER THEY CATCH ME A LIAR?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A waste. People who use this book deserve to be lied to., 19 Sep 1998
By A Customer
A manipulative, small minded book. By using the methods described in this book you will--
A: Alienate friends, coworkers and random acquaintances. B: Prove to everyone that you really are paranoid. C: Realize how hollow your life is as you lie in order to expose the countless liars around you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Use at your own risk., 27 Aug 1998
By A Customer
While the book contains a few useful (if commonsense) hints, mostly it encourages quick judgments based on limited and unreliable observations, as well as the use of manipulative and sometimes deceptive techniques to determine whether other people are lying. This is likely to do more harm than good in just about any situation.
I also find the warnings about the limitations and ethical implications of the techniques inadequate, and even though the book claims to be based on "the latest research", it lacks references or further readings.
If you find yourself frequently in situations where you are concerned about whether other people are lying to you, that should indicate to you that there are other problems in your life or business. A book on communications, relationships, contract law, negotiation, and/or business organization is likely to serve you better.
In a kind of circular logic, the book may have some value in letting you recognize when other people are trying to apply the techniques it describes. While the techniques are hardly subtle, identifying them specifically as indicators of suspicion and insecurity in a relationship may let you address the underlying issue more constructively (assuming, of course, that the suspicions are unfounded).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fails miserably to deliver what the title promises, 2 Sep 1998
By A Customer
I don't want to hear about or use "techniques" to expose lies; not enough time and energy to spend in this endeavor. Besides, such techniques are deceptive and deception is dishonesty and those who will try to fool me into believing that I can fight dishonesty with dishonesty deserves to be driven out of town with tar and feathers.
This book is much ado about nothing. It left me flattered and pumped up with a sense of false invincibility. It is nothing more than the stereotypical "shrink" spiel: "There is nothing wrong with you, others are to blame." Is this why it is a bestseller? Because it leaves readers with a false good feeling about themselves?
The prospective reader will save a lot of valuable time by passing on this selection and instead keeping in mind the following quote from Conrad Hilton's autobiography: "I personally have been able to to business with some pretty rough characters; but I have never been able to deal with a liar. It is, as my cadet friend at Roswell would have put it, like shadow boxing. It isn't worth the effort. You can't win."
You just don't deal with liars; you avoid them. I wonder why this didn't occur to the author.
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Never be Lied to Again
Never be Lied to Again by David J. Lieberman (Paperback - 20 Jan 2000)
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