Customer Reviews


33 Reviews
5 star:
 (20)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


35 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hard
Hard reading for a Brit raised on The Battle of Britain, Airix models, the Victor comic and Commando comic books. I later learnt of the deliberate starvation of Germany after the Armistice, The injustices of Versailles, the vacillations of the West in the thirties and the colossal sacrifice of the Soviets.

However there was much in the book I was ignorant of...
Published on 3 Sep 2010 by Rocket88

versus
36 of 52 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but not convincing
Buchanan's brief history of WWI is excellent and the reader cannot fail but cringe at the stupidity by the leaders of both sides (pre and post War). His analysis of WWII however is far weaker.
Delving into Hitler's "intentions" is impossible. Buchanan argues: Hitler had no intention of attacking England, therefore the English should have kept out. Many retort: "he...
Published on 18 Jun 2008 by Alvin


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

35 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hard, 3 Sep 2010
This review is from: Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World (Paperback)
Hard reading for a Brit raised on The Battle of Britain, Airix models, the Victor comic and Commando comic books. I later learnt of the deliberate starvation of Germany after the Armistice, The injustices of Versailles, the vacillations of the West in the thirties and the colossal sacrifice of the Soviets.

However there was much in the book I was ignorant of. Does anyone fully understand the causes of WW1? How about Britain's staunch pre-war ally Japan? Danzig? the political situation in Poland and central Europe between the wars?

Pat Buchanan's political views make me wince but I can't fault his reasearch and am concerned that his forebodings for the West may be prescient. On finishing the book our current flounderings do seem oddly familiar.

If you have an open mind this is a jolly good thought-provoking read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, 6 Nov 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World (Paperback)
History is often said to be written by the winners. The reality is far murkier. It's more often a string of facts-at best-moulded by the writers own prejudices, opinions and narrative. It mostly ignores the effect of the collective mind of of the people and how those who should be wiser are equally drawn to make erroneous decisions through the same contagion and not in spite of it.

Buchanan Is clearly aware the effect the crowd and strong myth has on the decisions of statesman, although he often resorts to today's tabloid style expose headlines to express opinion rather than sticking to dry forensic analysis and logic. However this does not detract from the work itself because the questions he poses provoke the reader to examine those decisions and myths that continue to effect how we see the world today.

What really struck me was just how easily we lead ourselves into the barbarous conflict and the process by which this becomes an inevitability. Even with millions dead and Europe in total ruin it's almost easy to convince ourselves there were winners and losers. Buchanan shows that there are only losers and yet those who are revered today as saviours and heroes-who had sort fame on the glorious field of battle-do themselves conclude the price was not worth the transient moment of joy of that fame.

We should all learn the lessons that this book provides. That those we promote to lead us are as fallible as we are. They cannot make 'better' decisions despite education, intelligence and character. Indeed they seem hell bent on violent destruction and are poised to indulge their whims in the rosy glow of public opinion. They are ring masters giving the crowd what it wants and we promoted them into those positions to provide that service. Conflict appears to be just something that we are drawn to as moths to a light bulb. We seek it and yet are revolted by it. This book exposes our underlying desire for violence and the esteem in which we hold those who can make it happen. The idea that we seek peace is a fallacy and Buchanan exposes the lie that we tell ourselves. We continue to elect those who can provide the entertainment of destruction and revere the leaders who vicariously give us some form of victory. N
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An eye opener, 10 Dec 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Like most people born in the post war years I grew up on a diet of Churchill the Great Hero. I bought the book after a German contemporary asked me, "Why did Churchill keep bombing our cities when we had so clearly lost the war". I thought the answer was that Hitler had refused to surrender, but then I started to think about this more deeply. Although I do not share the politics of Patrick Buchanan and thus read his book with caution, the contents were an eye opener. He gives not only his own views but those of other well established historians to make his case. I would recommend this to anyone who would like to hear an alternative view.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent commentary on the history, 31 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Mr. Buchanan gives a rather pedestrian history of the run up to the First World War, but this is made up for by his analysis of the period between the wars and the slide into the Second World War. His analysis is cogent and lucid. It is written in easily readable language and provides insights which many other histories have managed to omit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


39 of 49 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Great Civil War of the West, 16 Oct 2009
By 
James Gallen (St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World (Paperback)
This work combines meticulous historical research with Pat Buchanan's political agenda. The point of the book is that Winston Churchill, rather than being the indispensable Man of the Century and defender of the West was the man most responsible for the British involvement in World War I, World War II and the loss of the British Empire?

Buchanan highlights three monumental errors which lead to the Twentieth Century's Civil War of the West: The Treaty of Versailles which left Germany vengeful and receptive to Hitler's message, American pressure on Britain to abandon its alliance with Japan and Britain's war guarantee to Poland in 1939. Without those errors World War II may have been avoided or its destruction mitigated.

Buchanan challenges the conventional wisdom that German aggression against the West was inevitable and that Churchill alone focused the attention of the West on this mortal threat. He posits the idea that Hitler's ambitions were focused to the East and Southeast and that he tried to preserve the peace with Britain and France. Buchanan claims that Hitler reluctantly turned on the West only after it had declared war on Germany.

In contrast to many of our histories which present the story of the World Wars from the Anglo-Franco perspective, this one also includes the German one also. Buchanan makes the case that, as Europe tumbled toward war in 1914, it was the Kaiser who worked tirelessly to avoid war. Time after time during the inter-war years the West let opportunities to limit rising power of German or to channel its destructive path away from the West drift by. He proposes that Hitler did not have ambitions to conquer the world, but that he would have been satisfied to expand into Russia and leave the west alone. It was Churchill and likeminded Britons who forced conflict between the German and British people who shared so much. This book compares the Nazi atrocities with those of Stalin's Russia and asks the question of whether the defeat of Germany justified the Stalinization of Eastern Europe?

Churchill's motives are exposed as being hypocritical. After excoriating Chamberlain for not defending Czech freedom and insisting that Britain go to war to preserve Polish independence, Churchill meekly turned his allies over to Soviet tyranny. Buchanan contrasts the strong claim for alliance made by a democratic, industrial, militarily modern Czechoslovakia with that of a dictatorial Poland defended by an antiquated military. He presents 1939 as a reckless period in during which Britain gave war guarantees to countries, including Poland, in whom Britain had neither national interest nor the ability to defend. He contrasts the case of Belgium, whose shoreline was of vital interest to Britain, with that of Poland, in which Britain had never had much interest.

The depth of historical research which went into this book is staggering. That alone makes it a worthwhile read. Buchanan's conclusion advances his crusade against the use of American power in areas in which America has no vital interest. Although his political agenda drives this book, it is not totally outside the current of historical thinking. Although I have not read his work, I understand that British historian, Niall Ferguson, has advanced the theory that Britain made a horrendous mistake by becoming involved in World War I, a position which Buchanan seems to share. This book presents the reader with a viewpoint which forces one to rethink his or her own thoughts about the Great Civil War of the West.

Ultimately, this book, like so much of the history of the Twentieth Century, is tragedy. When we think about it we realize what terrible damage and suffering the West inflicted upon itself during this recent century. Books such as this make us stop to think that, maybe this half century of war and tragedy was not necessary. Maybe our leaders brought it upon us and maybe, just maybe, these self-inflicted wounds could have been avoided. Maybe the Decline of the West and Christendom was not necessary and, if so, that is the tragedy of the age.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars arguments for anyone who doesn't like the stereotypical perception we are normally fed, 2 Aug 2014
By 
O. McGonagle (Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Absolutely fascinating, no holds barred, arguments for anyone who doesn't like the stereotypical perception we are normally fed. Will suit those who have been suspicious of the standard line we normally call history..
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very thought provoking, 9 Nov 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I've read this twice now, the first time I enjoyed it so much I failed to take notes. It's a very enjoyable read, and contains a high proportion of thinking-to-writing from the author. I was a big Churchill fan and read Roy Jenkins on Churchill and Buchanan has succeeded in, without really saying anything Jenkins didn't say, convincing me otherwise in a quite fresh take on the events surrounding these wars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars She emerged as global super-power following the unnecessary destruction and civil war among European nations, 25 Nov 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Only America profited from WW2. She emerged as global super-power following the unnecessary destruction and civil war among European nations. England lost her wealth, navy and colonies. Had Colonel Beck of Poland only returned the 2 million Germans living in Danzig to Hitler, the needless war could have been avoided, states Irving.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 11 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Absolutely brilliant. Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Makes you think, 21 Sep 2009
By 
Gm Clayton (Carlisle, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World (Paperback)
This is a fascinating book that is quite contraversial for those people who do not believe that Churchill had any flaws. The clue is in the title but having read it I could not show it to an old soldier who regarded Churchill as a great leader.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Churchill, Hitler, and "The Unnecessary War": How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World
Used & New from: £7.54
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews