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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Forgotten Soldier - not to be forgotten.
If like me you are a little nervous picking up books about war and think that they may only glorify the great scale of battles, victories and tactics then I would recommend the Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. This book is a first person account of life on the eastern front from the perspective of a young, naive man, which simultaneously depicts the fall of nazi Germany...
Published on 26 Dec 2003 by Adam

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good story, but...
This book wasn't exactly what I thought it was going to be--a detailed account of a soldier's participation in the battle of Stalingrad. So, maybe that was my fault. The book reads a lot like "All Quiet on the Western Front", and Sajer does a good job, IMO, of describing the daily life of a "grunt". His accounts square with others that I have...
Published on 6 April 1999


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10 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars He wanted a war. He got it., 9 May 1999
By A Customer
Reading the Sajer's book one can come to a conclusion that he came to Russia with the only one purpose: to survive there. His book, though a dreary description of his endless sufferings, nevertheless reveals a motivation of German soldiers on the Eastern front. Sajer, though raised in France, is a product of a totalitarian state. His world is black and white. On one side is "sweet and sensitive" Germany. On the other end is a faceless mass of "Bolsheviks". He toured the famous (?!) Warsaw Ghetto where people died of hunger on the streets, saw a mass execution of Russian POWs being blown out by a grenade. Now he knows what he is going to fight for. In his sufferings, he blames the Russian weather, Russian army, hostile population etc. He never asked himself: Why I am here? What I am doing here? For him his feld is a god and above all his beloved Fuhrer whom he cited occasionally. Ignited by the tales about Russian cruelty, he is ready to approve and perpetuate any crime. On one occasion, the only thing that stopped him from shooting civilians: his officer did not give an order. Their bravery is a bravery of a criminal being pushed against the wall. Their comradeship is a comradeship of a gang united by the common goal: to avoid the justice. He might not realize but otherwise witnessed that his army waged a war not only against the Russian Army but also against Russian people at large. Russians responded in kind. That was why the Eastern front saw the most brutal and fierce fighting that is beyond a comprehension of a Western reader for the Western front never saw such kind of a war. While for him survival means to get out of Russia, for Russians it had meaning that is more tangible: to stay alive in their own home. His description of the battlefield is quite realistic which confirms what I have learned from Russian sources: efficiency of Russian artillery, their determination in an attack. After all, Sajer has nothing to complain. He was born to die as his division's motto says. He got out of Russia alive. My grandfather, a Sr. Lieutenant of Russian infantry was born to live so he hoped, was killed in Stalingrad. Sajer is a little screw of the horrendous machine of destruction. Should he ever be remembered? Who is really forgotten are Russian soldiers who saved the world from the types like Sajer.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars May not be accurate, 17 Mar 2012
Although i enjoyed this book very much, a lot of it is somewhat to be desired. The book was wrote many many years after the war and some of it does not match to books that were wrote while very fresh in the mind straight after the war. Overall a very goof book, but if studied you will find info that you may question and by researching you will spot this (i dont have the info to hand as i read this a very long time ago but remember matching to other books that were a lot fresher at the time)
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very nice book, 21 Sep 2007
By 
jacopo "Jacopo" (Italy) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) (Paperback)
I can't deny that this is a wonderful novel about the experience on the eastern front from the german point of view.

obviously you cant be sure 100% that this story truly existed ...
some facts described are discordant and can give you some doubts if this is fact or fiction...

anyway i want to suggest to everyone this awesome diary/novel!

regards
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7 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well.., 5 Jan 2004
By 
ELIZABETH GARTSHORE (NESTON, SOUTH WIRRAL United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) (Paperback)
This is a great book but if you run a search on Guy Sajar you will find a lot of research that proves the entire book is fiction. I read the book before discovering this and it was a great disappointment considering how much I was drawn into it. Reguardless, there is a lot to say that this book is *FICTION* not a true account. Beware.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I read a lot of military history and this one just does not ring true, 29 Jan 2014
By 
I. W. Bennett - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) (Paperback)
all personal stories contain at some stage of the narrative something which highlights the authenticity of the story. I am reminded of the war memoirs of the historian C M Bowra from the 1st war describing the experience of seeing for the first time a fellow soldier being killed at the side of him and thinking illogically that they must find a policeman to report the crime. you just could not make that up
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14 of 41 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Doubter........., 4 Nov 2008
This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (Hardcover)
This book just demonstrates that you can get any opinion you want on the internet.
Having read many WWI books I noted someone stating that this book was much better than Ernst Junger's 'Storm of Steel'.
I could not get a quarter of the way through this book. Having bought it I really did my best. As soon as I started, it did not feel right. When I see a memoir full of dialogue I immediately get suspicious. I could not get anything out of this book. I feel really annoyed by it. It is almost unknown for me not to finish a book. I could list any number of good war memoirs. This wasn't even good as a novel. I found it terrible, and I am astonished that it has ever been so highly rated, and surprised that it's authenticity has only recently been questioned.
A complete waste of time and money!!!
Wikipedia leads to articles on the matter.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not what it seems, but magnificent anyway., 3 Nov 2004
By 
J. Buckle "buckello" (Liverpool, UK) - See all my reviews
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The author has clearly done his research well as when this book is read in conjunction with Berlin and Stalingrad it is a very believable and realistic account, even if it is fiction.
After reading this book I really didn't care whether Sajer existed or not, or whether his account is true or not. It is simply the best book about the Eastern Front during the Second World War that you will ever read. Harrowing, miserable and horrific. In spite of the repugnant cause for which the main character is fighting, I challenge anyone with any shred of humanity not to feel a deep sense of closeness with him by time you read the last page.
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6 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Absolute rubbish, 10 Jun 2012
This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) (Paperback)
I simply cant believe that anyone has been taken in by this book. The author has quite plainly never been a soldier at all, let alone served in an elite Wermacht division.

Things dont start well for this Guy when he gets bounced out of Stuka aircrew training. The very elite within an elite of an elite. He then inexplicably finds himself out of the Luftwaffe altogether and serving as a rifleman or driver or something in Poland. He then spends a couple of chapters bimbling around the eastern front, forgetting his rifle and generally behaving like a clueless nitwit until you lose the will to carry on with this tripe.

I couldnt get more than a quarter of the way in to this book before tiring of snorting with derision at the ludicrous accounts of how the author imagines soldiers might behave and boggling at his supposed ability to recall verbatim an ad hoc speach by some Nazi fuctionary.

You would get a better idea of the war in the east by reading a gardening handbook than you would by reading this drivel.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the forgotten soldier, 17 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) (Paperback)
Purchased for our son in law who is interested in all things to do with war and those who fight. I have not had any feed back from him as yet
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 7 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) (Paperback)
I have not yet had the chance to read it yet, but I know from a friend that is good
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The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS)
The Forgotten Soldier (CASSELL MILITARY PAPERBACKS) by Guy Sajer (Paperback - 15 July 1999)
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