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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Book Re-Opening My Tired Eyes To An Old Topic
Considering the dearth of sources for Ancient History I continue to be surprised by how academics can produce new twists - or perhaps it is just my memory. Peter Krentz writes without the partisan spirit of some historians, suggesting and opining rather than deciding. He takes us back into history to see Athens as a "slave" of Persia, via the Peisistratids (I never can...
Published 11 months ago by Charles Vasey

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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Don't read this on a kindle.
I enjoyed this book, but unfortunately the Kindle edition on which I read it has none of the illustrations. Being directed to 'refer to printed edition' is increasingly frustrating.
Amazon- perhaps you would care to send me a printed edition as you so frequently suggest I refer to it?

An interesting book, but don't read it on a kindle.
Published on 5 Nov 2010 by Dr R Weller


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Book Re-Opening My Tired Eyes To An Old Topic, 26 Aug 2013
By 
Charles Vasey (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Battle of Marathon (Yale Library of Military History) (Hardcover)
Considering the dearth of sources for Ancient History I continue to be surprised by how academics can produce new twists - or perhaps it is just my memory. Peter Krentz writes without the partisan spirit of some historians, suggesting and opining rather than deciding. He takes us back into history to see Athens as a "slave" of Persia, via the Peisistratids (I never can tell my Hippias from my Hipparchus) and out into the Plain of Marathon. We watch Datis approach alternating between stick and carrot through the Cyclades. We look at hoplite warfare - was it the sychronised swimming of warfare or closer to the granular fighting of affinities led by big men. Arriving at Marathon we are treated to a tour of the battlefield via the evidence and the views of historians. He touches much and illustrates more. Wonderful.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clearer insights into Marathon, 30 Nov 2012
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G. McGuire (Greece) - See all my reviews
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Krentz has here produced a fast flowing well researched work, which in effect agrees with Herodotus's view that the 5th century Greek charge against the Persian forces at Marathon was all part and parcel of a well-thoughout strategy by the Greek general Miltiades. He argues that the charge effectively put paid to any impact the Persian cavalry might have have had. The mainstay of this book is that Krentz backs up his conclusions with a considerable mound of textual and artistic evidence. if you want to understand in some detail the battle then this is certainly book. A must to read for both student and general reader alike.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'The Father of Lies' no more?, 4 July 2011
By 
Mr. James Dickson (Sheffield, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Battle of Marathon (Yale Library of Military History) (Hardcover)
Peter Krentz delivers a very calculated, assured, methodical and comprehensive argument which unpicks the contrary assertions of more modern historians, by challenging what has seemingly become the status quo of deriding contemporary historical sources, largely under the premise that they were prone to exaggeration (whether by personal, political or other influences). What the author achieves in his analysis, is an argument that accepts potential for bias and establishes the fact that no source is immune to criticism but that equally the evidence, in all its multifarious forms, together with a logical analysis of events, does (in his argument at least) tend to support the original claims recorded by Herodotus of the battle of Marathon.

The book is at no point preachy or derisive of other sources and acknowledges and puts forth other seemingly valid arguments and principles, which ostensibly bolster rather than undermine his argument and all of which are critiqued thoroughly and effectively but done so whilst never losing track of the main subject matter. This is a prime example of intelligent critique and highlights the importance of historical analysis as well as the necessity to review material continually in order that we never become complacent or arrogant in our accepted view of the past, as everything should be open to interpretation, for the very credibility of the discipline.

I prefer not to indulge too far into an analysis of the argument proposed as the author does this quite effectively themselves. What should be said however, is that this is a tremendously informative, objective and reasoned assessment of the battle of Marathon and the events surrounding it, which encompasses a mass of evidence whilst addressing the various perspectives involved. It also has a wider relevance with regard to how we address issues of contention today and how contrary opinions should be open to discussion and objective analysis in much the same way that our past is, rather than imposing and accepting rigid dogmas with which to make our arguments.

This book will provide excellent reading for the most devout as well as the more casual enthusiast, it's easily digestible and comprehensive in equal measure. I implore you to read it.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Marathon book, 7 Oct 2011
This review is from: The Battle of Marathon (Yale Library of Military History) (Hardcover)
Peter Krentz's book on Marathon is, I think, the best synopsis of the available evidence on the market. I am a fairly serious amateur historian; I read Ancient Greek, I know the sources, and I recently helped put together the 2500th Anniversary reenactment at Marathon. And, of course, I wrote a novel about it... Prof Krentz has provided some new evidence, especially new images from the Persian world, while reviewing the available evidence and even the historiographical evidence. Balanced, very informative, and careful, I appreciate Krentz's approach, his willingness to use all forms of evidence (archaeology, textual, and even the views of skilled reenactors.

And the book is a pleasure to read. I read it in two sittings; Krentz is not just a good historian but a good author. I cannot recommend this book too highly.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Don't read this on a kindle., 5 Nov 2010
I enjoyed this book, but unfortunately the Kindle edition on which I read it has none of the illustrations. Being directed to 'refer to printed edition' is increasingly frustrating.
Amazon- perhaps you would care to send me a printed edition as you so frequently suggest I refer to it?

An interesting book, but don't read it on a kindle.
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The Battle of Marathon (Yale Library of Military History)
The Battle of Marathon (Yale Library of Military History) by Peter Krentz (Hardcover - 3 Sep 2010)
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