Customer Reviews

34
4.5 out of 5 stars
The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England,1400-1580
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£12.96+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 February 2015
Everything perfect. Thank you.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 26 October 2011
If you are interested in the history of England then you must read this book. Its subject matter is the English Reformation, arguably the single most important event to have befallen the English people since the Black Death in the mid fourteenth century. Professor Duffy sets out to prove that the Roman Catholic Church was in fine fettle on the eve of the Reformation and that the reforms that took place were top down and forced through against the wishes of the majority of the people. Given that history is usually written by the winners (and the Protestants indisputably "won" the English Reformation) this is a welcome and necessary question for any serious historian of the early modern period to explore.
Is he right? This is the question that most commentators have addressed. I would ask a slightly different question which is; does he make a powerful and compelling case? My answer to that would be yes he does. However, like any good historian the professor has studied the evidence, formulated a point of view and written a book to argue his case. Every historian has, to a greater or lesser extent an "axe to grind" and the professor's is as sharp as the next man's. The reader's task is not to decide whether or not this is the "truth" about this episode but rather to place the professor's account alongside those of other historians who take a different view and come to their own conclusions and understanding. This is important. No-one is "right" about anything in the past in that sense and a good job too! The last thing we need is some sort of officially-approved middle of the road, universally agreed version of the past. There lies the death of History!
Putting these weighty issues to one side for a moment, I would say that the best thing about this book is the window that it opens up into the lives and minds of our medieval forebears. Professor Duffy quotes extensively from the original sources. He lets the people speak. At first this slows you down a bit as you try to work out exactly what they are saying to you. But gradually you will find that a bridge is being built for you across the centuries over which you can pass into a world that had largely vanished by the end of the sixteenth century.
One example of that vanished world appears on page 136 with the description of the medieval Rogationtide processions. All the members of the village would progress around the boundaries of their parish with the aim of driving away any evil spirits that might cause sickness or disharmony within the community. Occasionally when a procession from one village ran into the procession from another fighting would break out, as each believed the other was trying to unload their evil spirits upon their neighbours. A wonderful example of how the past can appear to be "another country" and this fascinating book is full of them.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 30 January 2014
A very good book which I bought for my son who is studying Theology at the university Groningen Netherlands.

Very satisfied!Higly Recommended!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 28 November 2011
I read this when it first came out and bought it again recently for a present. It should be required reading for anyone interested in the history of the Reformation, challenging the old Whiggish assumptions about popular attitudes to the religious changes and to the means employed by the authorities to enforce them. Duffy backs up his thesis with rigorously researched documentation. Engagingly written and an enthralling, often tragic, story.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 10 February 2013
This book has already been widely acknowledged as the most erudite of recent contributions to our knowledge of late mediaeval christian religious observance in England. It has redresssed the balance of knowledge about this period, to show how rich a heritage was destroyed at the time of the Reformation, and how, despite some corrupt and venal leaders, the main body of the Church remained devout, holy and charitable. Professor Duffy's obvious love and fascination for Middle English bestows a certain charm and flavour to his writings - a veritable historic treasure-house!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 21 October 2014
Superbly written; a serious subject for serious study.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 13 August 2014
real helpful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 January 2015
Excellent book and service.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 1 October 2012
Even the very excellent reviews of this book do not do it justice. The scholarship and depth of research are inspiring. It is probably the most enlightening and moving book I have every read. No one who wishes to understand late medieval Catholicism in England and the enforced divorce of the English people from their cherished Church and religion can afford not to read this outstanding work.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 25 October 2014
Had to collect from Post Office as too big to post in my door,maybe I should have specified a place to leave it. Just one mark across width of book but doesnt stop reading .excellent throughout.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Reformation : Europe's House Divided 1490-1700
Reformation : Europe's House Divided 1490-1700 by Diarmaid MacCulloch (Paperback - 2 Sept. 2004)
£13.59

Fires of Faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor
Fires of Faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor by Eamon Duffy (Paperback - 3 Aug. 2010)
£12.08
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.