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4.6 out of 5 stars16
4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 10 December 2014
Timeless and profound! Be warned if you don't like dense writing you will struggle getting through. It is not aimed as a popular Christian book, but nor only for theologians - rather those who like to dabble in serious thought!
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on 9 June 2013
This is the most inspiring book. Having a Kindle version just makes it easier for me to read and re-read it.
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on 25 December 2012
As described at a good price and just fine and dandy and its silly you are forced to use more words!
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on 18 January 2013
I bought this as it was on my reading list, it is very good though, a great help for what i needed
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on 19 February 1997
labutler@texinet.net I first read this book in 1954 while enrolled in Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. I don't know how many times since then I have pulled it out and reread it. LUTHER BUTLER
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on 3 November 2000
...I know of no sane person who has read his systematic all the way through without having been compelled by someone higher up in the power structure of academia.
This leads me to the thesis of my review. Tillich was not a theologian or as some would no doubt suggest, a philosopher. I cannot put my finger on exactly what he was. The most honest and least vitriolic (though this book simply begs for vitriol) description I can provide of this book is that it is vague. Tillich seems to want to make some universalist and yet subjective statement about courage and anxiety, but he never pulls the trigger on it. He dances round and round the subject, leaving the reader both tired and queasy.
This leads me back to the question of Tillich. Is this book the work of Tillich the theologian, Tillich the existentialist philosopher, or an undefined, wholly other Tillich? I don't know. However I do believe I know who Tillich was writing for; and I believe this is the key to our question about Tillich, meaningful as part of understanding the book, and of the utmost importance to you as you consider whether or not to buy and read this book. It is my sincere belief that this book was written for that all too common half-breed that is found in our universities: the Liberal Academic (those who are too lacking in honesty to be true scholars and yet still fearful enough to admit their own atheism).
Tillich is still widely read by captive audiences under the tutelage of these academics. This ensures why this book is still read and discussed. This notwithstanding I urge you to take my honest and heartfelt advice: don't read this book unless one of them forces you to.
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