Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A perfectly decent stab at a summary of the period allocated
PerspectiveX's comments are supremely silly and misleading. He is not really comparing like with like. Maurice Ashley's book has over 215 pages in which to discuss a reign of 21 years and a life lasting just under 60 years; James Chambers has to canter over the lives and reigns of five monarchs lasting more than 125 years, not all of whom are of equal importance. Both are...
Published on 28 Aug 2008 by A. D. Clover

versus
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Repetition, contradiction and inconsistency
Those who buy this expecting the author to concentrate on the reigns of William II, Henry I and Stephen will be disappointed. He wastes three chapters going over the ground already covered in Maurice Ashley's more adept life of William I and - what makes it even more inexcusable - actually contradicts Ashley's assertions in both fact and argument. When he finally gets...
Published on 26 Jun 2008 by PerspectiveX


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A perfectly decent stab at a summary of the period allocated, 28 Aug 2008
By 
A. D. Clover (Shrewsbury, Salop) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Life and Times of The Norman Kings (Kings and Queens of England Series) (Hardcover)
PerspectiveX's comments are supremely silly and misleading. He is not really comparing like with like. Maurice Ashley's book has over 215 pages in which to discuss a reign of 21 years and a life lasting just under 60 years; James Chambers has to canter over the lives and reigns of five monarchs lasting more than 125 years, not all of whom are of equal importance. Both are popular works, but none the worse for that, as both are well written and careful in their judgement.
To show the snag in PerspectiveX's argument: although Ashley has more scope to devote attention to Archbishop Lanfranc, William's brilliant chancellor, for more scholarly respectable and detailed information the reader would have to go to Helen Clover's edition of Lanfranc's Letters in the Oxford Medieval Texts series as well as to Margaret Gibson's Lanfranc of Bec, who completed her edition when Mrs. Clover died prematurely,.
In fact both Ashley's and Chambers' books are very well illustrated with maps and contemporary material. Both contain very decent bibliographies, but Chambers' is denser and more extensive. To my mind he is as usual stronger on the methods of warfare.
PerspectiveX's review mistakes the aims of these two very acceptable accounts, brought out only eight years apart by the same publisher. Ironically Antonia Fraser provided the introduction or editorship of both books. It is absurd to require a uniform opinion on William I, whom some may regard as no better than a second rate soldier endowed with some Viking charisma. In the end, given that sources are limited for medieval history, there is a premium on interpretation and the quality of the writer's inference from scarce data. By PerspectiveX's rather Soviet era reasoning it is actually the overall editor Antonia Fraser who ought to be criticised. I am happy to own both books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Repetition, contradiction and inconsistency, 26 Jun 2008
This review is from: The Life and Times of The Norman Kings (Kings and Queens of England Series) (Hardcover)
Those who buy this expecting the author to concentrate on the reigns of William II, Henry I and Stephen will be disappointed. He wastes three chapters going over the ground already covered in Maurice Ashley's more adept life of William I and - what makes it even more inexcusable - actually contradicts Ashley's assertions in both fact and argument. When he finally gets round to what should have been his principle focus, his writing style hits the skids and he passes from the flowery to the slightly incoherent. Had he concentrated on the 3 post-Conqueror monarchs his obvious lack of originality may have been excusable, but to be derivative in such a way that contradicts an author writing in the same series a few years earlier borders on the ridiculous. Sorry, but same series should mean same "hymnsheet." To be fair, it does provide some insight into the 3 monarchs concerned, but at times he does it in such a rushed and unclear way it's almost as if he got bored with the subject half way through. What a mess.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Life and Times of The Norman Kings (Kings and Queens of England Series)
Used & New from: 15.00
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews