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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my all time favourite books.
This book describes what it is like to go gradually blind. John Hull is a professor of religious education in Birmingham and is regarded as a guru by most British religious education teachers. He has a profound Christian faith which is so secure that it allows him to ask frank and terrifying questions in search of truth. He describes the psychological, physical and...
Published on 16 July 2000

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Despair of a happy man
I was recommended this book following an injury to my own sight. I began reading small snippets - all I could manage at the time. It provided some interesting facts for me but I was struck at how the author seemed not to be 'accepting' his blindless despite the fact that he repeatedly records saying how he is completely blind. All becomes clear near the end of the account...
Published on 10 Jun 2012 by Book Addict


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my all time favourite books., 16 July 2000
By A Customer
This book describes what it is like to go gradually blind. John Hull is a professor of religious education in Birmingham and is regarded as a guru by most British religious education teachers. He has a profound Christian faith which is so secure that it allows him to ask frank and terrifying questions in search of truth. He describes the psychological, physical and spiritual changes which took place in his life over the period of a few years when he lost his remaining sight. The descriptions are startling and fascinating. Reading the book has changed the way I relate to blind people. Passages include the importance/irrelevance of smiling and eye contact, the way a rainstorm lights up a usually silent landscape, the development of a sixth sense which can tell you when you walk past a lamp post, the use of a child to scoop a tiny peanut from the floor, the changes in dreams and a blind persons analysis of Psalm 139. Professor Hulls book has since been republished under a new title, "On sight insight" and his most recent book "In the beginning was Darkness" is due out soon; a blind person's perspective on the bible. John Hull's writings are wise, perceptive and illuminating. Ignore him at peril to your soul!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Facinating book, 29 May 2013
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Bought this book for a current research project, and read it over quite a while. It's an extremely fascinating series of observations and anecdotes, so if you are interested in knowing more about the multi sensory body, I definitely recommend that you read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing!, 21 Mar 2014
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Amazing story and very well written. A humble spiritual man who expreses his emotions and thoughts during his time of transition into blindness.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Despair of a happy man, 10 Jun 2012
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I was recommended this book following an injury to my own sight. I began reading small snippets - all I could manage at the time. It provided some interesting facts for me but I was struck at how the author seemed not to be 'accepting' his blindless despite the fact that he repeatedly records saying how he is completely blind. All becomes clear near the end of the account when he finally admits that he was hanging on to dreams of regaining at least some sensation from his one eye - the eye that finally failed after operations before the start of the account in 1983. The book is really a diary of despair, of little events of great personal meaning, of experiencing emotional overload equivalent to high blood sugar comas in diabetics. It is a curious account that can depress and uplift according to your own state of being. Nevertheless, one does get a sense that John Hull is in fact a happy and friendly individual and can find humour in his personal hurts. I loved his description of "collecting the post" - curtesy of two of his children.
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Touching the Rock: An Experience of Blindness (SPCK Classic)
Touching the Rock: An Experience of Blindness (SPCK Classic) by John M. Hull (Paperback - 16 May 2013)
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