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43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deeply scholarly, shockingly readable!!
Like the other books in this series, this book combines an astonishing amount of scholarly research and reflection with a style that's not only readable but - dare one say it? - at times, wickedly impish. Casual asides, sometimes buried in the footnotes, point out some of the illogical conclusions or lazy thinking of other scholars, and do so in a wry style that's apt to...
Published on 28 Sep 2004 by J. Scott

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3.0 out of 5 stars a good, informative read.
I have read only a handful of N.T. Wright's books and I have not been disappointed. He is a very good communicator. Although I do not agree with all of his conclusions, I still appreciate the clarity, insight and perspective he has on Christian theology, Biblical interpretation and his humility in presenting the Gospel. Jesus and the Victory of God is an important book...
Published 5 months ago by Mr. D. Butt


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3.0 out of 5 stars a good, informative read., 28 Feb 2014
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Mr. D. Butt (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Jesus and the Victory of God: Christian Origins and the Question of God: v. 2 (Christian Origins & the Question of God) (Paperback)
I have read only a handful of N.T. Wright's books and I have not been disappointed. He is a very good communicator. Although I do not agree with all of his conclusions, I still appreciate the clarity, insight and perspective he has on Christian theology, Biblical interpretation and his humility in presenting the Gospel. Jesus and the Victory of God is an important book that disserves a place in the library of every theologian, cleric or layperson. Some reviewers have complained about this book and others in the series that N.T. Wright is longwinded in his writing; I don't necessarily agree. Martyn Lloyd Jones was most certainly longwinded, but N.T. Wright is explicitly thorough in his research; which has both pros and cons. For those use to trudging through the weeds of academic writing, then Jesus and the Victory of God will be easy reading. For everyone else who finds this difficult, reading this installment, particularly N.T. Wright's newest volume in the series released in 2013, to be somewhat tiresome. As an example, the introduction to the book exceeds 100 pages and highlights the interpretive methods of previous scholars on the life and influence of Jesus; all of which is important for study, but at the same time immensely tedious. Elsewhere in the book, as I read through the different chapters, I couldn't help but feel as though N.T. Wright was needlessly spinning out the chapter or topic simply to make the whole volume larger. I doubt that this is true, but it certainly began to feel like it about half way through. Overall, this was a good, informative read; you may not agree with everything that N.T. Wright draws conclusions on, but the best way to learn about anything is to read something that challenged you to think differently.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book - full of clarity and commonsense, 1 Nov 2013
This review is from: Jesus and the Victory of God: Christian Origins and the Question of God: v. 2 (Christian Origins & the Question of God) (Paperback)
This is an amazing book and NT Wright writes with a strange authority and a depth of knowledge that is staggering. It is not an 'easy' read, but always accessible and totally compulsive. Anyone - whether Jewish or Christian - should read this; Wright plunges Christians straight back to their Jewish roots where we can at last come to know something of the real Jesus. Now for the next volume...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Scholarly and true to the faith, 8 April 2013
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This review is from: Jesus and the Victory of God: Christian Origins and the Question of God: v. 2 (Christian Origins & the Question of God) (Paperback)
When Tom Wright authors a book under the name "N T Wright" you know it is going to be scholarly and will demand careful reading and close attention; so it is with "Jesus and the Victory of God". It is a thorough and highbrow critique of many scholarly publications and the broad range of evidence about Jesus, the early church and the New Testament. But it is a critique by a man who is sincerely and genuinely committed to God, whilst being honest about his source documents. Jesus can be accepted in simple faith, but people with enquiring minds and a capacity for long words may wish to delve into the evidence of history, rather than throw their brains away. For such people, this is a thoroughly worthwhile book to read - and to read again.
However, this is not a book for people who seek an easy read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A fresh look at Jesus, with something to challenge everyone, 12 Sep 2012
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S. Meadows (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Jesus and the Victory of God: Christian Origins and the Question of God: v. 2 (Christian Origins & the Question of God) (Paperback)
In the introduction, Wright takes issue with those who propose that we can know very little about Jesus himself and who propose that there is a stark difference between the `Jesus of faith' and the `Jesus of history'. Instead of accepting this proposition at face value, Wright sets out to examine who the Jesus of history was and what his aims were. He proposes that many Christian theologians have, over the years, examined very closely the idea of why did Jesus die, but at the neglect of the question as to why he lived.

This is a book for the patient reader, yet it is well worth it. The one drawback to the book, which is highlighted early on, is that, for the most part, the testimony of John's gospel is ignored. This may frustrate many readers as it seems as though Wright is dismissing one of the key witness statements. Part of the reason given for this was one of brevity, as the book is over 600 pages long (plus bibliography and index) on the basis of the 3 other gospel accounts.

Wright's portrait of Jesus is that of a man who understood himself, and was understood by others, as being a prophet, using as his foundation passages such as Mark 8: 27-30 and its parallels. The key theme to the book is what Jesus meant by the "kingdom of god" - a topic that I've often found glossed over in many different churches, presumably on the assumption that everyone knew and agreed what the referent was, even if it somewhat hazy.

After his "portrait of a prophet" Wright moves on to look at the aims and beliefs of Jesus. Much of this is tied in with what has gone before. It is here that Jesus moves onto the end of Jesus' life.

In trying to understand Jesus in his historical context, Wright does seem to be missing a very big side of the story. He is keen to stress that in order to understand Christology you must first get "Jesusology" or else risk putting the cart before the horse. But I cannot feel that by focusing exclusively on Jesus' reformation of the Jewish worldview and ignoring the impact on Gentiles and at any time and place other than 1st century Israel/Palestine, that Wright is painting a portrait of the horse and cart, only without legs and wheels, so that Jesus is so firmly rooted in his setting that he is static and has nothing of relevance to say to 21st century westernised christians. Only at the very end of the book is this problem acknowledged. The proposed solution is that everything changes with the resurrection, so the reader is referred onto the next volume.

In his discourse of Jesus in relation to "apocalyptic" Wright swims against the tide of 2,000 years of theology to deny that there will be a "second coming." Though hints are dropped throughout the book, the core argument is given in Wright's exegesis of Mark 13. Rather than consider this a new form of apocalyptic, Wright chooses to read this as a strictly Jewish apocalyptic in exactly the same vein as Daniel.

I would wholeheartedly recommend this book to christians, jews, muslims and atheists. To understand christianity (and how it relates to Judaism) one has to study the figure of Jesus. And though this doesn't cover all aspects of Jesus' ministry and life, it certainly covers a lot and in a lot of depth. It is at once both enlightening and challenging, asking us to look at our worldview in a different light - just as Jesus did in his day.
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