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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great... until page 137, 6 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
Fantastic book and spot on with regard to our changing world and the part an honest approach to social networking can play in the status elevation of companies and (conversely) the potential for the rapid downfall of comapanies who get it wrong or try to 'greenwash or nicewash' their credentials, as Jones puts it.

Unfortunately, having made the case for corporate honesty, Jones is then compelled to declare his own work (he is CEO of Euro RSCG) with the Conservative Party election campaign 2007 - 2010 and then on page 137 he believes David Cameron to be 'arguably the most socially responsible leader of a major country in the world today'

Talk about believing your own spin! That kind of brown nosing killed it for me. IMO, for what it's worth, all our politicians, whatever party, are masters of spin, nicewash, greenwash, and are guilty of the most shamelesess two faced hypocrisy imaginable. Good book though.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A book that does well and good, 3 Jan. 2013
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
It must be ten years ago that the book "Good Business" by Steve Hilton and Giles Gibbons came on the market, and a few years have passed since John Grant's excellent "Co-opportunity". "Who cares wins" is the natural successor to these ground-breaking books on business as a force for good.

What David Jones cleverly does in "Who cares wins" is to bring the idea of good business into the mainstream, highlighting it as a necessity for all businesses, not just new start-ups as we enter the "Age of Damage". In addition, he joins up the dots between Social Media and socially responsible businesses. Social media is the means by which people (please, not consumers or even prosumers!) will work together with companies and organisations to Do Well AND Do Good.

The underlying premise of the book - that to succeed in the 21st century, businesses have to do both - "well" and "good" is excellent and the idea of the Age of Damage is a strong one (and was confirmed at the tail end of last year with the various tax-related stories involving Starbucks et al). Overall, the book is clearly written and enjoyable to read.

The marketing-cynic in me can't resist a few minor nit-picks about the odd cliche: there's a lot of embracing going on here, usually involving empowered consumers, and words are often unnecessarily qualified by "really, truly or genuinely", but perhaps I just notice these things because I'm guilty of them in my own presentations ;-) In addition, to make the point clear, a black and white picture of then (silos, profit-greedy companies, captive consumers in front of TVs) and now (brave new world of benevolent young green-blooded business people with responsibility at the heart of all they do, think and say) comes over which isn't strictly accurate.

This is an important and forward-thinking book with some excellent examples from the whole spectrum of business. I also liked the optimism, clarity and action-orientation of the author's style.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ground Breaking, 23 Nov. 2011
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This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
This book achieves the impossible - it manages to be ahead of the game in an area of our lives that is changing by the second - the influence of social media and how we interract, behave and engage with others.

I picked up this book expecting a lot of theorising and conjecture. I know little about the author other than his reputation as someone determined to get us talking about social change. But this book is full of hard examples good, bad and very bad (B.P) of how businesses large and small are fastening on to the notion that ethical behaviour pays long-term dividends for their business, their customers and society in general and that embracing social media is the most effective way of getting this message across - in other words, that honesty pays and that "management's role isn't to control, it's to create value".

The book is beautifully written and Jones's personality really shines through. By the end I felt as if I knew him. It is full of real examples of brands and companies that we've all heard of and the 'Ten Lessons for and from Social Entrepreneurs' neatly dovetails the often bi-polar concepts of working ethically and making money.

A very timely book that anyone with a passing or a vested interest in how we conduct our indivdual and corporate lives in a way that brings profit with peace of mind should most definitely read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring book!, 27 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
This is an outstanding book by David Jones, who through his work as Global CEO of Havas and Co-Founder of youth summit One Young World, has established himself as one of world's most progressive and inspiring business leaders.

David's argument that good business is better business, illustrated with real-life examples, anecdotes and case studies, resonates with me as a member of Generation Y. What's more, his fellow CEOs across industries and geographies, are already following his example by changing the way they do business. Above all, it is written by a business leader who has walked the talk at Havas and beyond, and whose passionate belief that business must be a force for good is evident throughout. His infectious enthusiasm for good business means the book is well-paced and logically structured, whilst offering powerful evidence-based arguments. This is a really compelling, inspiring and well-written book, providing great insight for both up-and-coming business leaders and more established industry figures.

Alan Mak is co-author of TheCityUK's Next Generation Vision for Financial Services, and a member of the University of Cambridge's Alumni Advisory Board
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What we knew in our hearts but no one said, 27 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
Who Cares Wins gives concrete examples of companies that have succeeded by doing the right thing. It matches the sentiment that many of us feel personally which however we do not see universally in every day corporate life.

This is not a bland airport read with cheesy examples and a gung-ho approach. I can imagine this becoming standard reading for all up and coming managers

Andrew Robertson is Co Chairman of the Imperial College Business School Alumni Board
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All business should be done this way., 24 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
This book shows us that the world of business does not need to be a dark immoral place. If all business was conducted this way the world would be a much happier place. Good read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spot on!, 29 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
This is an excellent book which accurately describes the growing realisation in business that corporate social responsibility isn't simply a nicety, it's a necessity.

Concisely written, the author's use of contemporary case studies and chapter summaries holds the interest throughout - I would certainly recommend it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a Must!, 7 Dec. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
Exciting and challenging - this isn't just about big business - it's a great read for anyone starting a business, running one or about to go in and try and change one. It's sharp and relentless in making case for new priorities - where sound business sense and ethics work together.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 30 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
Really brilliantly written - sharp insight. A very interesting book which looks set to lead the way (define?) the way business is done in the 21st century. Jones uses his ad-world knowledge to succinctly put across his theories on the right way to do business.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 23 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Who Cares Wins: Why Good Business is Better Business (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
I think this is a clever book, that gives readers a real insight in today's advertising world. This book will shape the way organisations approach their day-to-day business.
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