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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars After e-Business comes...f-Business
Or Funky Business, to be more precise
It is full of hyperbole, is at times intensely irritating, and includes nothing I did not know before...but it is packed with great stories, examples, jokes and for a pair of assistant professors from Stockholm its a very entertaining read. They get it completely... Its a pre-bust book which still makes sense post bust. The...
Published on 25 April 2001 by Colin Harper

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good introduction to the Information Age
This is definitely an interesting book to read. The authors convincingly outline the dynamics of today's economy as it edges closer to a market driven, knowledge hungry space shaped by the combined forces of cooperation and smart competition, where you and I are freelance agents, autonomous companies, brands. Me Inc. as the authors like Tom Peters claim. And Me Inc...
Published on 25 Nov 2005 by Papanastassiou Alexandre


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where's the meat?, 13 Jun 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Funky Business (Paperback)
Ridderstrale and Nordstrum are big on language, big on hype and big on change, but less convincing about what we should be doing next. Business we're told is changing, individuals will not be loyal to companies, companies may only exist for a decade or so before deciding to do something else or ceasing to exist, all business professors will wear black and shave their heads as statements of individuality
OK, maybe not. Still, having read the book with high hopes I can't help feeling a bit cheated. Our shaven headed MBA's point excitedly at all these new and exciting things but don't seem to have any suggestions as to what to do about them.
Given that one of them has achieved some quite impressive things at Razorfish its a shame that more practical advice wasn't laced into the hyperbole.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars monkey business, 10 Dec 2010
By 
R. Schulz (Tamworth, Staffs, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Yet another example of gobbledegook from the unreal world of business ideas. See Francis Wheen's book, "How Mumbo-Jumbo conquered the world", for many more examples. The recent history of international economic stupidity and greed should alert the wary about spurious justifications for dubious practices. The authors throw out plenty of catch-words and phrases, but little is grounded in the real world. Don't waste your time reading the book unless you like modern fairy tales. It will soon be forgotten and destined for the scrapheap.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars no substance, 9 July 2008
By 
Jorge Gonzalez Alvarez (Zürich) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I bought the book for a train travel and I ended up throwing it to the garbage bin and enjoying the view.

The book doesn't have any insight or real content, just a bunch of flashy sentences as "the competitive advantages now last as long as the dreams of a butterfly"... "we need humanagement instead of management"... "the most important asset you have is your brain"... don't expect to actually learn anything from this book, unless maybe how to write for pages and pages without saying actually anything.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deservedly popular, 19 Mar 2005
One of the most popular innovation texts of the late 1990's, this focuses on how talent and not physical assets is the key to success today. Written by two of Sweden's leading thinkers, it raises key concepts for the future such as 'People worth employing' and 'Organisations worth working for' and how the two can interact to create value in an increasingly blurred society.
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12 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars D-D-Don't believe the hype. (Apologies to Chuck D.), 11 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Funky Business (Paperback)
If you're the kind of person that reads those recruitment ads that use words like 'dynamic', 'proactive' and 'innovative', and feel a sense of true elation, then this book is for you.
It's hard to believe that two so highly educated men could be so insular in their outlook on modern business. The history of business and manufacturing for the past century (think Fordism, Webers' Rationalization and Taylors' Scienctific Management) directly contradicts the writers' points. Weber gets a quick mention on page 211, in a sentence alongside a mention of bureacracy, but the pair otherside choose to ignore that fewer and fewer people (and less still after the dot.com bust) can choose to be this way. Take a walk through your local business park, and see the ranks of workers doing jobs that have increasingly less skill attached to them, and then wonder about they premise of the book.
The idea that we all truly control our destinies through our most valuable asset, our 1.3kg of grey matter, is depressing when you think about it: the insinuation is that there is no value left to be attached to manual skill in the workplace - what's the point of developing such skill when a machine can do it quicker?
It's part of a wider delusion - the one in which our managers tell us we're all brilliant and necessary parts of the team, we should be dynamic, entrepreneurial, pro-active etc etc, when in reality if we were as such we wouldn't be working under a manager, and their business wouldn't be going very far.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Stimulatingly unstimulating, 30 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Funky Business (Paperback)
I found it extremely frustrating for its lack of specific detail about what we should all be doing in this new funky world. The text itself is stimulating enough but, im sorry to say, says NOTHING new that Tom Peters, for one, hasn't already said...ad nauseam. His "Pursuit of WOW!" was a vastly more stimulating read. Don't bother with this one ladies and gentlemen. I smell REFUND.
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9 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars So bad its a classic, 23 April 2002
By 
Nigel Eccles (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This is not your typical business book, its fun and funky just like work is, er only most work isn't fun and funky. That's kinda the problem with this book. It's writing about the way we'd all love our work to be but unfortunately for 99% of people 99% of the time it isn't. Rewarding, yes, satisfying, yes, enjoyable, quite possibly but fun and funky...?
My guess is that the authors visited lots of dotcoms during the boom and saw lots of chillout rooms and fussball tables and thought "WOW, this is funky". What they probably didn't notice is that (a) very few people had time to use them, (b) they certainly aren't using them now!
However on the plus (?) side the book doesn't tax the old grey matter and its got lots of pretty pictures.
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