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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars easily comprehendible
A novice in the world of finance, I found the guide clear and useful in its interpretation amidst the vast information found in the financial pages. The definitions, explanation on the various indices as well as financial jargon, has provided a useful insight into the workings of the financial world.
Published on 4 Jan. 2001

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Almost as dense as its subject.
The writer has no idea of the desperate ignorance of the audience.
Published 1 month ago by Rod Boyes


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars easily comprehendible, 4 Jan. 2001
By A Customer
A novice in the world of finance, I found the guide clear and useful in its interpretation amidst the vast information found in the financial pages. The definitions, explanation on the various indices as well as financial jargon, has provided a useful insight into the workings of the financial world.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very clear and well referenced, 23 Oct. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The "Financial Times" Guide to Using the Financial Pages (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
Veyr useful book for non financial specialists looking to interpret financial information - includes useful glossaries, definitions and guidelines to locating and understanding how to apply key financial data.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Figures, 23 Aug. 2010
By 
Neutral "Phil" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
It is characteristic of critics of the financial system that they do not understand it. The same could be said of some who work within it and have inculcated a culture based on norms which appear as anathema to people living in the real world. Yet there is so much financial information used in every day discourse that everyone should try to understand what it means. The financial pages may appear complex but by systematic study it is possible to acquire sufficient knowledge to increased one's wealth while contributing to society's improvement.

The arrogance currently associated with certain sectors of the financial industry is not new. As Winston Churchill once commented, "I would rather see finance less proud and industry more content." He would be disappointed with the current situation in which industry is stifled by lack of lending by firms making large profits. Yet much of the criticism of financial markets is based on ignorance of the role finance plays in the economy. This excellent book sets out the essential reasons for understanding the financial pages and is highly recommended. It will not tell you everything you need to know but it will point in the right direction.

There are splendidly brief but meaningful chapters written on investors, companies, financial institutions and the government as players in the markets. The second part of the book is about interpreting the markets, identifying indices, aggregates and equity markets in the UK and abroad, commodities, derivatives, bonds, gilts, cash, currency and international capital markets. What emerges is not a conspiracy against society but a far from integrated ebb and flow based on the traditional market practice of greed, fear and the herd instinct.

Those such as Richard Branson, who emphasised tracking the market as the way to safeguarding investments, overlooked the time delay between market movements and the importance of judgement in knowing which of the three characteristics of market movement is applicable at any one time. A lot of market trading is based on investment models. These, in turn, receive information about key performance indicators and the ratios which make investment worthwhile. They are not fool proof.

The idea of someone sticking a pin in a list of company names and coming up with a massive profit (as is often claimed for penny shares) is a myth. The only way to make money in the financial markets is to study it in depth. The most successful investment managers such as Anthony Bolton and Warren Buffett spend months studying stocks and invest for the long term, taking into account past performance as well as potential for future performance. Those who visualise fat cats making money at the drop of a hat are out of tune with reality. In many ways the best way to read this book is to concentrate on learning the last two chapters, especially the final one which refers to sources of information, institutional advice, reading between the lines and, of course, consulting the Financial Times.

Some years ago Peter Young was a successful investment manager for Deutsche Morgan Grenfell. He gave an interview to one of the trade magazines which expressed some doubt about Young's claims for investment success. In retropect the writer was warning of an impending collapse. Perhaps he was aware that Young had developed the habit attending work dressed as a female and asking to be called "Beth". Surprisingly no-one at Morgan Grenfell considered his behaviour to be worthy of further investigation. Young was sacked then sectioned under the Mental Health Act which prevented a criminal prosecution but led to a Hearing of Facts at which a jury found the case against him proved by a vote of 11-1. Apparently he is still sectioned.

This guide will not teach you how to make money but it will explain how money in made. Investment in stocks and shares are for those who understand the market. Therefore, getting to know the market is essential. The underlying principles of investment remain unaltered. Only invest money you can afford to lose. Trust your own instincts and work systematically (if need be through an investment club). Most of all start with the Financial Times Guide to Using the Financial Pages even if your conclusions suggest investment is not for you. Five stars.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Almost as dense as its subject., 31 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: The "Financial Times" Guide to Using the Financial Pages (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
The writer has no idea of the desperate ignorance of the audience.
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14 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lost in the financial jargon, 5 Dec. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The "Financial Times" Guide to Using the Financial Pages (Financial Times Series) (Paperback)
After a few pages I was at a total loss. The author kept mentioning all the jargon, saying that will examine this in more detail in chapter X. Another thing I noticed is that the advice on this book about what each index says is not very sound. For instance high P/E ratio says indicates a growth company and is worth investing. It then goes on to correct saying that it may also indicate that the share is overpriced. Confused? The only good thing about this book is that it covers many topics so you may find it useful.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Long Winded and Perseverance Required, 27 Nov. 2007
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This is very long winded and can be very hard work, simply because it's written by a propeller head for propeller heads. However, it can be digested by ordinary people with supreme effort and perseverance. Should you decide to continue, you will be well rewarded as all the information you need is here. Although it's unlikely you'll ever finish it, having long since given up.
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