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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Complete, thorough...
Quote from a previous review:
Instead of touching on new technologies, such as AI, graphics, or anything else remotely relevant to today's demands on programmers and designers, this book, faithful to its MIT roots, gives a pompous, eggheaded distortion to the field of computers as a whole. Its focus is mainly on such trivialities as algorithm analysis, offering...
Published on 3 Aug 1999

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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars O.K. Book
This book is ok if you just want to implement the stuff. also it gives an idea of newer topics (like amortized analysis etc.) But one flaw of this book is that it lacks rigor---but perhaps that's got to do with the title---Introduction to Algos. Still a book whose code i've seen in use in the STL (silicon graphics version)
Published on 7 Jun 1999


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46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Complete, thorough..., 3 Aug 1999
By A Customer
Quote from a previous review:
Instead of touching on new technologies, such as AI, graphics, or anything else remotely relevant to today's demands on programmers and designers, this book, faithful to its MIT roots, gives a pompous, eggheaded distortion to the field of computers as a whole. Its focus is mainly on such trivialities as algorithm analysis, offering about 10 pages of proofs for each simple assertion. The points that the authors hope to make have no relevance whatsoever in a world in which processor power, not meticulous code optimization, reigns.
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I've had Cormen (one of the authors) as a professor in class, and my algorithms class uses this book, so admittedly my view might be a bit biased. But if you read the above (quoted) review, you might have gotten the wrong impression about this book. Cormen et. al. *intentionally* left "AI and graphics" algorithms to other authors; this isn't the place to cover those topics enough to do them justice. And as someone who has actually read the book, each proof is *not* 10 pages long. The examples are usually quite good, and concisely (if thoroughly explained). Finally, prof. Cormen always explains to his intro CS students why the study of algorithms is important, even as computers get faster and faster: some problems, poorly implemented, just *will not* run as well on a machine of today compared to a much older machine running a better algorithm. There will *always* be a justified place for the study and analysis of algorithms. Had the previous reviewer actually had met Prof. Cormen, he wouldn't be able to write the book off with the title of "pompous" or "eggheaded" either...
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the definitive algorithms book, 22 July 1999
By A Customer
This is the best CS book I've ever seen. Clearly written, with pseudo-code implementations for all the algorithms it describes. Its coverage is incredible, to this day whenever I have a need for an algorithm no matter in what area, first thing I do is look in CLR, and chances are it is in there.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Without Equal., 6 April 1999
By A Customer
This is *the* book on algorithms -- exhaustive and rigorous. If you're not up for straining your mind once in a while, you'll have a hard time of it; this is the textbook used in MIT's 6.046, and students at the Institvte are famed for their tolerance for ridiculous complexity. Rivest is the "R" in "RSA Encryption" and Cormen and Leiserson are deities of algorithmland, so you know this is one of the true authorities.
Be forewarned, however, that this is not a particularly accessible book for non-theoretical CS students. Mathematical foundation should be VERY solid.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reference for all programmers!!, 3 Aug 1998
By A Customer
This is the definative quide to computer algorithms. It is not to be construed as an introduction by any means. It is an exhaustive text that answered all my questions that I had in college. The author uses pseudocode to illustrate the ideas and concepts which is benefical if you program in more than one language. It is the most widely used reference that I use in regard to algorithms. I highly recommend this book to those who are really serious about computer science and the study of algorithms. This book is not for novices. Some background in computer programming is required. Best computer alogrithms book I have ever seen so far.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is fundimental for all people in Computer Science., 21 July 1999
By A Customer
I read this book in college and we used it through almost every computer science course that I took. It is great for reference and to gain a clear understanding of data structures and algorithms. Just a great book to have in your library.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for every computing professional, 17 Nov 1998
By A Customer
This is not only a fine textbook for an academic course but also THE reference on algorithms for every programmer's library. It covers both general theory and loads of specific examples. The presentations are readable by anyone having a command of U.S. high-school mathematics. I've owned it for several years and I refer to it often.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent text of moderate difficulty, 26 Oct 1997
By A Customer
An excellent survey of the field of algorithms. From a mathematical perspective its lighter than Knuth and heavier than Sedgewick. If your algebra is rusty you'll have some problems, but you don't have to be a math whiz either. If your just looking for an algorithm "cookbook" you'd be better off with something else, but if you're looking to gain a very solid "undergraduate" level understanding in algorithms you couldn't do any better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent course and reference book, 10 Feb 1999
By A Customer
Covering all important and interesting topics in computer science, this book can be used as a reference book by computer scientists as well as a course book for undergraduate and graduate level algorithms courses. I advise all computer scientists to have this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Text, 5 Jan 1999
By A Customer
Cormen writes with amazing style and grace, his examples are coherent and strong. Cormen is considered a god-like figure in the study of algorithms and this book shows it.
A must-buy, this book has remained useful for at least the four years I've owned it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Book not for Beginers., 21 Dec 1998
By A Customer
The Authors have done a good job. They could have included good amount of examples in the first part which introduces Mathematical Background required. The Psudo code forms an excellent part of the book which will be more useful in implementing the algorithms as a computer program. The analysis of the algorithms are bit too lengthy. If the authors could come out with an answer book for the excercises, then this book serves its ultimate purpose.
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Introduction to Algorithms (MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
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