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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to understand figures
This book is a pathbreaking effort to show different ways to map sciences and scientific progress. It gives an outline of the history of science maps, presents also many of the persons behind the different ways of displaying the figures and facts about science. from the early knowledge compilers of the 18th century to some of the leading people in Open Access of the...
Published on 21 Dec 2010 by Olle Edqvist

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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed
Although many of the graphics are indeed painstakingly crafted, I frankly expected content that was more accessible in terms of a simple map of how sciences are interrelated, mainly with UP CLOSE graphic content particularly with respect to the interfaces of distinct sciences.

Where is the map of how M-theory interfaces String Theory, Quantum Mechanics and...
Published on 10 Nov 2011 by Robby


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to understand figures, 21 Dec 2010
This review is from: Atlas of Science: Visualizing What We Know (Hardcover)
This book is a pathbreaking effort to show different ways to map sciences and scientific progress. It gives an outline of the history of science maps, presents also many of the persons behind the different ways of displaying the figures and facts about science. from the early knowledge compilers of the 18th century to some of the leading people in Open Access of the present. The important milestones in mapping science are illustrated with examples, and their authors, along a time axis.

The conceptualization of science, including data acquisition, analysis, modeling and layout of different data is treated in some detail. Particularly different types of network analysis are well illustrated throughout the book. A whole chapter is dealing with spatial analysis, with nice examples from different times. Interesting case studies of how maps can be used to help us understand very complicated process of change are given (e. g. changes in important Wikipedia articles, forcasting large trends in science, disciplinary links in science).

It is a very useful reference work if you are looking for ways to describe complicated and big data sets (not only in science). But it is also a beautiful book in a large format with a great number of illustrations to the text which gives it a value above the scientific. It is a book which should interest many types of readers and which even can be left on the coffee table for casual browsing.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed, 10 Nov 2011
This review is from: Atlas of Science: Visualizing What We Know (Hardcover)
Although many of the graphics are indeed painstakingly crafted, I frankly expected content that was more accessible in terms of a simple map of how sciences are interrelated, mainly with UP CLOSE graphic content particularly with respect to the interfaces of distinct sciences.

Where is the map of how M-theory interfaces String Theory, Quantum Mechanics and Cosmology for instance? Was it too big a project to be included? Where is the CMBR IMAP data that Penrose and his colleague analyzed in late 2010 that shows there were at least TWO big-bang events, not one? Where in the sky, exactly, is this humongous structure, and how big is it to the unaided eye? Isn't this supposed to be an ATLAS of what we know? Where is the timeline of challenges and tests of Einstein's general relativity up to the present GPS satellites, and the 30 year missing solar neutrino mystery, and the revelation at CERN that the speed of light may actually NOT be the universal speed limit that relativity always assumed?

The science of Mathematics could fill an entire page of graphics, and how 21st century internet technology has benefited from various mathematical disciplines could probably fill hundreds of pages, all by itself. Stephen Wolfram tried to do this and largely failed, but this doesn't mean everyone should simply stop trying.

Where is the theory of Evo-Devo in this Atlas? Even the simplest graphics from this theory never fail to impress.

Sorry, but for all its promise, this book doesn't even belong UNDER my coffee table.
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