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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Valuable & Insightful Book By Australian Theorist
A seminal book in media theory, McKenzie Wark looks at the psychological impact of 'shock' events such as the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Tiananmen Square uprisings, the 1987 Stock Market collapse, the Persinal Gulf War, and the Rodney King and O.J. Simpson trials. The book is written for a university level audience, but is accessible to the new reader. Wark has had...
Published on 19 April 1999

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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the most boring books I have ever read.
One of the most boring books I have ever read, full of obscure sociological jargon and pretentious piffle.
Published on 14 Jun 1999


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Valuable & Insightful Book By Australian Theorist, 19 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Virtual Geography: Living with Global Media Events (Arts & Politics of the Everyday) (Paperback)
A seminal book in media theory, McKenzie Wark looks at the psychological impact of 'shock' events such as the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Tiananmen Square uprisings, the 1987 Stock Market collapse, the Persinal Gulf War, and the Rodney King and O.J. Simpson trials. The book is written for a university level audience, but is accessible to the new reader. Wark has had many articles published in international journals, and is frequently featured in Australia in Arena, 21.C, World Art, and major metropolitan newspapers. He is one of the most respected Australian theorists of a slightly left-of-third-way bent.
Wark examines how the media reports these events, what the impact on the larger cultural psyche is, and most interesting, how the journalists who report the events are affected themselves. Wark draws in contemporary postmodern and cultural theory, but his writing is insightful, crisp, and relevant.
Another important aspect of the book is that Wark is able to carefully dissect the U.S. media critically, whilst not being caught up in prevailing models (Chomsky, Bagdikian et. al). He brings a fresh, mature, and intelligent voice to a frequently crowded arena.
He is also somewhat unusual in that he doesn't simply repeat the doctrines of Marshall McLuhan and others, but really examines events. He is careful to include himself in this description, and his anecdotes are simultaneously revealing and powerful.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One of the most boring books I have ever read., 14 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Virtual Geography: Living with Global Media Events (Arts & Politics of the Everyday) (Paperback)
One of the most boring books I have ever read, full of obscure sociological jargon and pretentious piffle.
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