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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars HST on the money as usual. Classic.
Aaarhh, nostalgia! It is so comforting somehow. I remember reading this stuff as it came out. I was captivated by HST's writing after being shown the original airing of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as it appeared in RS. I subsequently read his coverage of the McGovern campaign in the 1972 election against Nixon issue by issue. All those articles were classics. Ever...
Published on 26 Feb. 2013 by R. Buckland

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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Avoid this HEAVILY EDITED collection
This book is an utter disgrace. It is far from "The Essential Hunter S. Thompson" as it is heavily edited throughout by Jann Wenner and Paul Scanlon. So what the reader is getting is a chopped and butchered version of Hunter S. Thompson's original articles. We are not even talking about excerpts here, the articles in this collection bear no resemblance to the original...
Published on 20 Jan. 2012 by Rory Feehan


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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Avoid this HEAVILY EDITED collection, 20 Jan. 2012
By 
Rory Feehan (Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This book is an utter disgrace. It is far from "The Essential Hunter S. Thompson" as it is heavily edited throughout by Jann Wenner and Paul Scanlon. So what the reader is getting is a chopped and butchered version of Hunter S. Thompson's original articles. We are not even talking about excerpts here, the articles in this collection bear no resemblance to the original writing. For example, Strange Rumblings in Aztlan has the entire first page chopped out, with this new edited version kicking off in the middle of a paragraph. To mask this Wenner and Scanlon have combined two of Thompson's sentences to start off the article. Yeah you read that correctly, the first sentence is a mutated piece of writing thanks to the hand of the editors. Fear and Loathing at The Super Bowl has pages upon pages cut from the original source, leaving an article that is disjointed and all over the place. The entire collection continues in this fashion with only 2-3 articles remaining untouched.

I cannot fathom what Jann Wenner was thinking when he decided to take this approach with Hunter's writing. Thompson would never have tolerated such interference with his work and Wenner knows this only too well. The collection also claims to include letters and memos between the pair but the reality is that you get 50 short letters of little substance, some of which are already published in Fear and Loathing in America. Comparing the two, the reader will also discover that Wenner has edited the letters, as if butchering the articles wasn't enough.

So at the end of the day, this book serves no real purpose. All of this work is already freely available in its original form, as Thompson intended, in both The Great Shark Hunt and The Gonzo Papers Anthology.

So please avoid this disgraceful publication and purchase either of the above books instead. At least you know you will have the original work and not some piece of quackery from Jann Wenner, who should know better and wouldn't have dared pull such a stunt if Hunter was alive.

I'd give this publication 0 out of 5 stars if Amazon would allow me to do so, it is that bad.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Shame and loathing., 5 Oct. 2012
By 
Stephen Howarth "Fastarse" (London) - See all my reviews
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Isn't it a shame that so many people rushed to produce some sort of literary product in the wake of Hunters death, isn't it sad to see Scanlon and Wenner doing the same. Just more fuel for the fire, time has come to burn the books, this one won't be missed, if you're a fan then you already have all the best bits - give it a miss.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars HST on the money as usual. Classic., 26 Feb. 2013
By 
R. Buckland (Edinburgh, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone: The Essential Writing of Hunter S. Thompson (Paperback)
Aaarhh, nostalgia! It is so comforting somehow. I remember reading this stuff as it came out. I was captivated by HST's writing after being shown the original airing of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as it appeared in RS. I subsequently read his coverage of the McGovern campaign in the 1972 election against Nixon issue by issue. All those articles were classics. Ever since, I have been trying to track down the article where he uses the phrase 'a belly-to-belly kind of morning,' meaning that it was a lazy day with no pressing engagements where you could indulge in some unhurried, languid sex with your best girl. I expected to find it in Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72, but no luck. This book seemed to be my last chance.
Previous reviewers of this latest release of HST material have bemoaned the apparent over-zealous editing of this volume, so I was not confident of success. But having re-read the material, it took me back to the early 1970s, when my generation were imagining that we were going to come to power and make a difference, and somehow, HST, in his confident, powerful, opinionated and deeply committed way seemed to be a cheer-leader. Here was a journalist who reported what he felt without concessions to convention or reputations. He had a way of making a story come alive. He did this by reporting it from the inside and becoming a part of the story - so-called 'Gonzo journalism'. This volume should be compulsory reading in all journalism courses. And, no, I did not find my quote, so perhaps this volume has been clumsily edited.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More Fear and Loathing, 14 Oct. 2013
This review is from: Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone: The Essential Writing of Hunter S. Thompson (Paperback)
On October 1st 1970 Rolling Stone published Hunter S. Thompson's `The Battle of Aspen', a raging account of Joe Edwards' run for Mayor of Aspen, Colorado under the Freak Power banner. It was his participation in Edwards' mayoral campaign that would inspire Thompson's own run a year later for Sherriff of Pitkin County and it was this article that marked the beginning of his thirty-year involvement with Rolling Stone.

In 1971 Thompson went on to contribute several articles to Rolling Stone. The most notable of these was arguably `Strange Rumblings in Aztlan: The Murder of Ruben Salazar', which concerned the stirrings of Mexican unrest in East Los Angles and also marked the introduction into Thompson's writings of fiery lawyer Oscar Zeta Acosta, who would eventually be better known as Dr Gonzo in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. However, it was in 1972 that Thompson truly became a key member [or perhaps even commander] of the Rolling Stone team when he was assigned to the new [and bespoke] National Affairs Desk and the magazine began to feature non-stop coverage of the Nixon-McGovern presidential campaign.

After Thompson's suicide in 2005, the then editorial team at Rolling Stone put together a special tribute edition based on "memories and vignettes from nearly a hundred of his friends, colleagues and co-conspirators." This special edition was then turned into Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson, a full-length and comprehensive biography. Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone is designed to be a companion volume to this biography, effectively providing an opportunity for Thompson's articles to serve as an autobiography chronicling the manic development of both his personal life and his unique writing style.

Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone collects thirty-nine of Thompson's articles, including six that have never been reproduced before. Those chosen articles cover a scintillating range of topics, from politics to boxing, crime to upper crust life in Palm Beach. While all of the articles are excellent and serve to highlight the best of Thompson's new journalistic style, there are a number of standouts. Amongst those is of course `The Battle of Aspen' but also the lesser known `The Campaign Trail: The Banshee Screams in Florida' [or Hunter Thompson versus Ed Muskie] and `A Dog Took My Place' [concerning the Pulitzer divorce]. While many of these articles are familiar, they all stand the test of time and are certainly worth revisiting.

Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone also features a Foreword by Jann S. Wenner and an Introduction by Paul Scanlon, both of whom were close friends as well as colleagues of Thompson. Both of these features are just as valuable to those wanting to know more about Hunter Thompson as his own words are. Having worked with [or, indeed, attempted to supervise] him for decades, Wenner and Scanlon are well able to comment on his creative process. Apparently, Thompson "would usually begin writing in the middle, then back up or skip around to write what he felt good about at the moment, reporting scenes that might fir somewhere later, or spinning out total fantasies ... that would also find a place." This method certainly ties in well with the innovative journalistic style of the work Thompson produced.

As any good autobiography should, Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone illuminates Hunter S. Thompson's character as well as his writing style. Thompson's perceived excessive approach to life is one of the things that made him so appealing and so anecdotes of that sort - "Between bouts of serious writing there was the usual goofing off and troublemaking. There were evenings of drug-fuelled adventures that left more than a few staffers dazed and worn out." - are particularly desirable for those wanting to know about both the man and the myth. A small sample of the correspondence between Thompson and Jann Wenner as well as a couple of hilarious memos to the Rolling Stone staff are also included in this volume. Both of these serve to provide greater insight into the private life - as opposed to the very public persona - and thought processes of Hunter S. Thompson and so are of particular interest to fans. In fact, it would have been great if more material of this kind could have been included.

Apparently, Thompson's total output for Rolling Stone exceeded four hundred and fifty thousand words and this was condensed down to some choice two hundred and ten thousand words for Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone. Given this still impressive word count, it is no surprise that Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone is being billed as featuring the "essential writing" of Hunter S. Thompson. Although perhaps best known now for his novel length works, Thompson was first and foremost a journalist [admittedly not always a serious one] and this volume certainly highlights his investigative skill and wit. Fear and Loathing at Rolling Stone is a highly recommended collection of some of Hunter Thompson's key works, works that help to shape a couple of generations.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE HEART OF THOMPSON, 12 Oct. 2013
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HUNTER S THOMPSON IS ONE OF THOSE HIGHLY INTELLIGENT UNIQUE HUMANIST NATURALLY ENTERTAINING MISANTHROPES WHO WERE VERY FUNNY AND EXTRAORDINARILY INSIGHTFUL INTO THE HORRORS OF THE FUEL THAT RUNS THIS DOOMED FUTILE WORLD- INSATIABLE GREED FOR MONEY AND POWER. HE ALWAYS HITS HIS TARGET WITH PINPOINT DRUGFUELLED ACCURACY
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hst falrs, 29 May 2013
Could not put this down, utterly sensational from start to finish. Captures each subject brilliantly and with a high degree of wit.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Voice of Gonzo, 22 Nov. 2011
By 
Joe Mendonca "Joe Journeys" (London) - See all my reviews
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Excellent collection of works from Rolling Stone with additional letters between tbe editor and Hunter himself. There is little new here, but provideds an excellent start to how this legend of Gonzo was created, along with the support and encouragement of Jann S.Wenner.

I'm a fan of Gonzo, this is the only writer of our time that really just wrote like it was, opinions and all.
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