Customer Reviews


21 Reviews
5 star:
 (15)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An involving introduction to life with autists...
First of all, I found this book to be a very good introduction to life with autistic children. Having said that, I don't think that anyone should be put off by thinking that it is only for those who know or have autistic children. It is a highly entertaining and involving story...
This book revolves around the lives of two autistic boys and their younger non-autistic...
Published on 18 May 2004

versus
10 of 45 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I Take Issue With This
George and Sam, both of whom have autism are two of three sons this author had. George, born January 26, 1990 appeared to develop normally the first 2 years of his life. The Beatle mopped moppet was verbal; identified objects and enjoyed books and some toys. His brother Sam, also adorably Beatle coiffed, born November 15, 1991 was less verbal. He, like George appeared to...
Published on 26 Jan. 2007 by BeatleBangs1964


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An involving introduction to life with autists..., 18 May 2004
By A Customer
First of all, I found this book to be a very good introduction to life with autistic children. Having said that, I don't think that anyone should be put off by thinking that it is only for those who know or have autistic children. It is a highly entertaining and involving story...
This book revolves around the lives of two autistic boys and their younger non-autistic brother. They live with their mother, the author of the book. Although it does discuss the many controversial issues surrounding autism, such as the MMR jab, the book is not just about the issues or indeed the medics surrounding autism. It is about the lives of the whole family and network of friends and helpers. With an introduction by Nick Hornby, the father of an autist, the book lacks nothing it set out to achieve, it is eye-opening and entertaining simultaneously.
A great and informative read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


41 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant insight into living with autism, 18 May 2004
By A Customer
This is an extraordinary and inspiring book. Charlotte Moore is the mother of three boys, two of them autistic. This is her account of living with children who can see no reason not to finger-paint with their own excrement, stay awake all night long, or climb on the roof to rip off and fling down the tiles. Moore last had an unbroken night’s sleep fourteen years ago.
But the book is anything but grim ( in fact, it is often extremely funny), and is written without a trace of self-pity or complaint. Moore does not see herself as either a victim or a heroine – though readers will see her as one. For her, her children are true individuals, loved so dearly that even their differences from “neurotypical” children are celebrated.
This is not because Moore is sentimental about the condition, or her children. Indeed, she is able to be so accepting of their behaviour, and find so much compensating richness in their peculiarities, partly because she is so tough-minded and clear-eyed. She wastes no time bemoaning the children George and Sam might have been or regretting the genius she thought she had when George was a toddler (heart-breakingly, George was extraordinarily precocious, able before his second birthday to recognise all the letters of the alphabet and recite poetry from A Child’s Garden of Verses). She recognises that her autistic sons are not ‘normal’ children trapped within their disability – to be released by some miracle cure; they are autistic through and through. “I learned, long ago, that loving children like these had to be unconditional. That’s true of loving all children, actually, but with autism you quickly learn that you can’t look for gratitude or reciprocity…This wasn’t a hard lesson to master. Loving them is the easy part.”
“Every day”, according to Moore, her sons provide her “with delight, amusement and joy” – which is what this book provided this reader. Like The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat, it made me marvel at the strangeness of the human mind – both normal and autistic. Moore is particularly fascinating on the link between language and a sense of self. George’s apparent infant precocity turned out to be chiefly brilliant memory and mimicry; as he grew older, it became clear that he found it difficult to create his own sentences. He uses quotations to communicate – often wonderfully apposite, intriguing or poetic, but often hilariously off-beam (“This will make Ben Hur look like a vicarage tea-party!” he exclaimed, when he found his mother having tea with a friend.). His less verbal brother, Sam, finds visual correspondences in the world about him which are as strange as anything in the ‘Martian’ school of poetry (tagliatelli was “seat-belts…’licious”).
Moore certainly convinced me that her children are fascinating – but not that I could have coped as she has done. The demands placed on her by George and Sam make the destructive antics of an average toddler look like a vicarage tea-party!
A truly wonderful book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant insight into the world of autism, 12 May 2004
By A Customer
This is an inspiring book. Charlotte Moore is the mother of three boys, two of them autistic. This is her account of living with children who can see no reason not to finger-paint with their own excrement, stay awake all night long, or climb on the roof and fling down the tiles. Moore last had an unbroken night’s sleep 14 years ago.
But the book is anything but grim (in fact, it is often extremely funny), and is written without a trace of self-pity or complaint. Moore does not see herself as either a victim or a heroine – though readers will see her as one. For her, her children are true individuals, loved so dearly that even their differences from “neurotypical” children are celebrated.
This is not because Moore is sentimental about the condition, or her children. Indeed, she is able to be so accepting of their behaviour, and find so much compensating richness in their peculiarities, partly because she is so tough-minded and clear-eyed. She wastes no time bemoaning the children George and Sam might have been or regretting the genius she thought she had when George was a toddler (heart-breakingly, George was extraordinarily precocious, able before his second birthday to recognise all the letters of the alphabet and recite poetry from A Child’s Garden of Verses). She recognises that her autistic sons are not ‘normal’ children trapped within their disability – to be released by some miracle cure; they are autistic through and through. “I learned, long ago, that loving children like these had to be unconditional. That’s true of loving all children, actually, but with autism you quickly learn that you can’t look for gratitude or reciprocity…This wasn’t a hard lesson to master. Loving them is the easy part.”
“Every day”, according to Moore, her sons provide her “with delight, amusement and joy” – which is what this book provided this reader. Like The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat, it made me marvel at the strangeness of the human mind – both normal and autistic. Moore is particularly fascinating on the link between language and a sense of self. George’s apparent infant precocity turned out to be chiefly brilliant memory and mimicry; as he grew older, it became clear that he found it difficult to create his own sentences. He uses quotations to communicate – often wonderfully apposite or poetic, but often hilariously off-beam (“This will make Ben Hur look like a vicarage tea-party!” he exclaimed, when he found his mother having tea with a friend.). His less verbal brother, Sam, finds visual correspondences in the world about him which are as strange as anything in the ‘Martian’ school of poetry (tagliatelli was “seat-belts…’licious”).
Moore certainly convinced me that her children are fascinating – but not that I could have coped as she has done. The demands placed on her by George and Sam make the destructive antics of an average toddler look like a vicarage tea-party!
A truly wonderful book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Honest and Insightful, 14 Nov. 2011
By 
Kate Hopkins (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: George and Sam (Paperback)
Charlotte Moore's sons George and Sam are autistic. This extremely entertaining and very brave memoir describes Moore's experiences of bringing up the two boys, along with their younger non-autistic brother Jake, and at the same time provides much fascinating information about autism and Asperger's syndrome in general. This book will certainly show people that the term 'autism' can embrace a huge range of conditions. Moore's eldest child, George, was initially thought to be a very bright early developer. Approaching adolescence, he is in certain ways extremely articulate, and loves stories and particular videos. But his reading level is very backward for his age, he finds engaging with other people in the 'normal' ways difficult, and has periodic obsessions and fears (including a terror for some time of becoming 'a man', during which he became nearly anorexic). Sam, Moore's second son, began life as a lively if somewhat inarticulate boy with a large number of 'obsessions': oast houses, washing machines, tumble driers - but after suffering a 'crash' (possibly exacerbated by gluten intolerance) at age six, became nearly unreachable for months; by the time he reached the age of ten Sam could communicate with others to some degree, but still found reading and writing nearly impossible, and often retreated into a strange world of his own.

Moore writes without a trace of self-pity, even though her life must at times be very difficult (and having two autistic sons eventually caused the breakdown of her marriage, about which she says very little). She's realistic about the havoc George and Sam can wreak in her lives (pouring orange juice into the kettle, chucking things into the kitchen range to see what'll happen, refusing most foods to name but three things) but manages to describe their disruptiveness with wry humour. Humour is a prime factor in this book - I'm still laughing over George's letter to Father Christmas: 'I would like a stick of rock and some firewood, Love from George' and his insistence that Brambly Hedge of children's book fame was across the road from his house, and Sam's rushing round a French cathedral blowing out the candles, as he linked them with birthday cakes! Moore also writes very movingly of her sons' beauty, of their marvellous sensitivity to colours, weather and nature, and of their bond with each other. And the general information about autists and Asperger's Syndrome children and adults and how they find their place in the world is well-researched and beautifully laid out.

A wonderful, extremely readable book, which I came away from admiring Moore hugely. I hope she, George and Sam manage to steer a smooth pathway into the boys' adulthood.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, very entertaining and witty, 13 May 2012
By 
A. Gannicliffe "cat lover" (Chertsey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: George and Sam (Paperback)
I've bought this book after reading a newspaper column by the Author and have not been disappointed. It's a very informative book, but at the same time entertaining and witty - it's a book that you won;t put down or forget to finish.
I've go a son who's been diagnosed with Autism 1/2 year ago and a lot of what Charlotte Moore recalls from the time before and just after the diagnosis rings true with my experience. It's very reassuring when she says that she realises her sons were born with Autism, but it was not easy to spot it at the time (smae applies to my son).
I would also recommend this book to grandparents/ other relatives of autistic boys/girls or anybody who comes in contact with them and wants to know more what makes them tick.

Thoroughly enjoyable read !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This will make Ben Hur look like a vicarage tea party!, 6 Aug. 2005
By 
Jessi - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: George and Sam (Paperback)
Written in a laconic, wryly humorous style, 'George and Sam' is a celebration of Charlotte Moore's two autistic sons. Many books on autism relegate autistic people to the background and focus exclusively on the disorder itself, but Charlotte has not turned her sons into case studies - she presents them as two marvellous, highly individual young boys, each with his own distinct personality and preferences. George cherishes a great love for language and has memorised hundreds of books and video soundtracks. He usually speaks only through quotations. Upon discovering his mother entertaining her friends to tea, he exclaimed, "This will make Ben Hur look like a vicarage tea party!" while the black wig of his auditory integration therapist (a Chasidic Jew) has led him to address her forevermore as 'Cruella'.
Sam is a swashbuckling adventurer with a passion for washing machines and muddy badger holes. Moore, wanting to test out George's tentative understanding of sex, once asked him, "Where did Sam come from?" George's perceptive reply was, "Sam came out of a puddle." The boys clearly couldn't be more different, and this is the greatest triumph of the book - Charlotte has succeeded in showing us that 'autism' is not necessarily a descriptor of personality, and that there is plenty of room for individuality beneath the autistic umbrella.
The book is also packed with practical, eclectic advice on everything from education to diet to therapy. Moore acknowledges that there is no definitive answer where autism is concerned and that what is right for one child might not be right for another. As Nick Hornby observes in his prologue, Moore doesn't claim to have her sons on a miracle program that will take them to RADA or Cambridge or Number 10 Downing Street - she just accepts them for who they are and supports them as best she can.
Although the overall tone of the book is humorous, and there are many laugh-out-loud moments, it is also shot through with poignant sadness. Her description of Sam's regression into silence, and the loss of the genius she thought she had in George, are gentle but stirring. There is no wailing or gnashing of teeth here. After she has finished describing Sam's obsession with laundry and his subsequent 'crash' into a silent autistic no-man's land, she writes quietly, "Sometimes I miss washing machines. They were at least something to talk about."
This book is truly exceptional - vivid, multi-faceted, and non-judgemental. Anyone who has ever come into contact with an autistic person, or who simply wants to understand the enigma of autism, should read 'George and Sam'. The laughter, the tears, the love, the loneliness, the hope and the happiness are all threaded through this amazing book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars George & Sam, 18 May 2006
By 
Such an amazing insight into the lives of family life and living with autism. This is the closest I have come to acceptance of my own family and our beautiful son. This is real life. I was in the dark and Charlotte Moore so gently peels away the pain and lands you in a bed of Marshmallow Realism. Unputdownable and a must read for all who lives are touched by this condition and importantly for all of you that want to have a deeper understanding (away from the sterotypical description that these individuals are bracketed into) into this most fascinating subject. I have read and reread in a matter of days and have finally been able to start my own account of who my son really is, rather than always wondering when the real boy would finally emerge, but most importantly now I can get to know him and love him as he is as opposed to waiting for some miracle to land on our doorstep with a mirracle cure! I cant Thank you enough Charlotte Howard for opening my mind and heart and reasoning to what is right there in front of me, and wish I could say thank you in person.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally ,a honest book about Autism, 24 Oct. 2005
This review is from: George and Sam (Paperback)
I finally got to read this amazing and wonderfully written,book about George and Sam.As a mother, of a nine year old daughter with autism ,I have read many a book on the subject.I could relate to so many of the stories,that are written in such a honest and loving way.This should have been one of the first books I read instead of all those miracle stories that give people such a false sense of hope about the future.I found so much of the book to be helpful,in terms of understanding the diagnosis and how the writer describes her sons daily struggle and her own.I am passing this book on to all of my friends who want know what it REALLY is like.A BRILLIANT BOOK.Go buy it today!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Honest and frank insight, 1 Mar. 2012
There is no autism in my family. I had no reason to read this book, but was drawn to it. Charlotte Moore was clear in her introduction that this book does not offer any magic solutions or even any real hope. But that said she did explain the challenges and cheer that comes with living with autism in the family. Like I say there is no autism in my family, but if any were diagnosed I would imemdiately recommend this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Honest and unsentimental, 3 July 2010
This review is from: George and Sam (Paperback)
I have an interest in Autism, but only by virtue of befriending one or two people with the condition, and was recommended this book by one such friend with Asperger's.

In essence this is the story of a family dealing with the complications arising from autism, and an attempt to try and 'understand' the internal worlds of two sons. I found the book very moving as you get a very real sense of the struggles of everyone concerned; including the boys themselves. Charlotte Moore makes her own assessments on the reasons and motivations for some of her children's behaviours which I found both interesting and persuasive. This is not a mother writing a book of her personal heroism, but about her endeavours to help her children, sometimes with success and sometimes with failure. Parents of autistic children have very inspiring life stories of their struggles to get their children diagnosed so that appropriate help can be given, and I feel this book gets just one story in thousands across convincingly.
The boys' father is unfortunately an all to shadowy presence (there are hints at a nervous breakdown), which I did think detracted from getting an overall picture, but in the end the author's purpose is to talk about her children, not her family.
I know one review has only given this book one star, because of what read like professional issues with apparent technical errors. Even accepting this criticism this is still a heatwarming and convincing tale and you are left wishing these people all the best for the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

George and Sam
George and Sam by Charlotte Moore (Paperback - 1 Mar. 2012)
£9.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews