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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars those who have eyes do not see
The West is way behind the curve if we take Moyo at her word. She's not so much upset with what China is doing (although perhaps she should be) but more upset that the West doesn't seem to be doing enough to keep the competition honest and fair. What is frightening is the ease with which China has moved into the developing world and made themselves indispensable...
Published on 22 July 2012 by CJ Craig

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting but in places rather dry book
Summary:

- The worlds resources are limited

- The worlds population is increasing and getting richer which is putting pressure on already dwindling resources

- China is trying to buy up as much of those resources that it can

- The result is that at some time in the future some very very bad things are going to happen...
Published on 23 April 2013 by Biff


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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read, well researched but a touch dry, 16 April 2013
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Mark H (London, England) - See all my reviews
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The subject matter of the book is undoubtedly important and is something that will shape the world in this century without doubt. How the resources of the planet are managed is key to us all, and China's recent rise in economic power is shifting the balance of power when it comes to who owns what.

The author is Dambisa Moyo who I read is an obviously intelligent academic who has already had other books on global economics published to her name. This is the first of hers that I have read and on the whole I enjoyed it. The research feels well done and is written with a good flow to it, though occassionally it can get bogged down in the figures. However to discuss this subject without 'proving the math' would be rather foolish and condescending to the reader. Putting that aside then, Moyo concentrates on illustrating with interest how China has a real problem within itself as the rapid growth means a huge new demand for energy and resources. The potential impact on the rest of the world is huge and again Moyo uses some very good examples to draw out how China is already steps ahead in effectively securing the high ground in the great race for resources. Some of the conclusions drawn are pretty scary, but it is important that people think about these things so we might stand a chance of avoiding disaster.

All in all a worrying, slightly depressing read but a very important one all the same.
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4.0 out of 5 stars When numbers exceed resources, what happens?, 4 Aug. 2012
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The popularisation of economics has resulted in a plethora of books by those who know but seem unable to write to those that can write but don't know. Dambisa Moyo is an academic and can write interestingly, which immediately puts the book on a solid footing.

The underlying premise - 'China is hungry for resources, what does that mean for us?' is a valid subject and there were plenty of facts and prophecies to keep me reading. My reservation was that Dambisa is a strong advocate and I was not entirely sure whether she had derived her conclusions from the facts she quoted or had merely searched out statistics to support her various strands of argument.

Having said that and although there were times when the outpouring of disparate nuggets of information was to the detriment of focus, this is an energetic and informed commentary. Whether it is over alarmist I don't know - it may be that if you make a point weakly it doesn't get heard. I enjoyed it, felt educated by it and by the end felt as if I had been reading the economic equivalent of a disaster novel.

This is readable economics delivered in strident fashion. I doubt it will bore you and would be surprised if it doesn't leave you with a slight shudder at the thought of what the future might bring.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting read, 29 Oct. 2012
By 
Darren Simons (Middlesex, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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The background to this book is China's hunger for raw resources, the way it has gone about getting the resources (notably from Africa) and more importantly the reaction of other governments to their behaviour. I was initially expecting the book to be a criticism of China with reference to some deals with dictators etc. However, the context of the book is against the development of previous empires, the suggestion of how such need for resources have previously led to war, and an analysis of the West's response to China's method. I wasn't entirely clear if the author was suggesting the West should behave differently, but suspected the conclusion was this is how the world's commodity economics will develop so live with it.

I found the book very interesting, and actually fairly well balanced. It's well written, informative and although the subject matter does jump around a little I felt I was more knowledgable for reading it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Concise Overview of the Future, 24 Aug. 2012
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A well-written book for those who don't like to get bogged down in loads of jargon, abbreviations and complicated economic formulae. DM does a good job in bringing what could be a messy topic into a clear concise form that spells out the situation in easy-to-grasp chapters and sections. The book flows, has depth, looks at all sides of the unfolding situations, and comes to its conclusions. We can either share them, reject them, or do a bit of both. Whatever we do will make no difference to the outcome. China is here to stay and it ain't going away. At least it seems to be using an attractive business model compared with the West: all sides come out happy (often that includes the ordinary people) rather than one (western country) clobbering another (non-western country) or taking what they want without giving back much at all. A worthy, thought-provoking read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating look at Chinese neo-colonialism in the 21st Century, 20 Jan. 2013
By 
George Rodger - See all my reviews
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A fascinating look behind the scenes of China's race for resources across the world. The strength of the Chinese economy, and the concomitant vast appetite for natural resources had only just appeared on the radar a few years ago. The occasional newspaper report hinted at a quiet storm taking place in developing countries, with a state-controlled and directed Chinese 'invasion' all over the globe, focusing on acquiring the scarce and precious natural resources that will fuel the next economic leap forward. They have the focus and the financial muscle, and they aren't choosy about which regimes they work with - often they'll step in where Western countries and corporations won't, because of human rights situations etc.
Moyo lays out a compelling story, that is very timely.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 12 Feb. 2013
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Ms. C. R. Stillman-lowe "Cathy SL" (Reading Berks) - See all my reviews
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The subject of this book is explained by its subtitle "China's Race for Resources and What it Means for Us". China has risen in 30 years to the world's 2nd largest economy but it has insufficient natural resources. The book describes the aggressive actions China has taken to remedy this and her attempt to stockpile such resources as land, water, oil, gas and minerals (especially copper, lead and zinc).

How worried should we be? Forcasting commodity movements is notoriously difficult and there are many loose cannons: China's looming property bubble,the possibilty of a bad harvest and the fall in the demand for exports may all force a chance in China"s economic policy and reduce her need to stockpile natural resources.

Rating 3 out of 5
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4.0 out of 5 stars An intriguing look at economic-colonialism, 26 Nov. 2012
By 
J. Morris "Josh" (London) - See all my reviews
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Empires rise and fall; Persian, Roman, British etc. However, the latest empire is not one of colonies and outposts but rather one of economic ownership and resource rights. China, it appears, is buying up the world and with the cash to do so - as other countries raid the silver cabinet to raise cash - it just looks as they might be able to acheive their goals.

An interesting look at the economic expansion and strategic reserve building by China and the manner that they are acheiving this. Well written in a fluid style, Moyo manages to explain a difficult subject with flair. Recommended for a look at Chinese economic expansion.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Again with China, 30 Nov. 2012
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In the background you can hear armies marching stoicly towards a grim faced leader.
China. Biggest country populus on the planet, what happens when the earths resouces become scarce? It isn't just a panic theory anymore. We are in a very real situation whereby the earths resources are listed in some logs as being at less than 10% than they were when we were at day 1. Worrying isn't it? China can afford more, use more, recreate more, store more and if one day it becomes nessessary take more.
Chilling.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Mad rush for resources, 23 Jan. 2013
By 
Michael Jenkins (glasgow United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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As the author rightly states, the world's resources are finite, and fast running out. Without scaremongering she takes us through China's push and ever increasing demand for what is left of these resources. Food for thought and a wake up call for the west, who appear to be using up all their resources for the war on terror.

As I said this book is not scaremongering, but I did find it to be just a little bit frightening, and a timely reminder, a very good read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, 16 May 2013
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An interesting, easy to read and a general eye opening account of a topic that most of us will be well aware of but far more informed about after reading this. It might come across as a bit of scare mongering, but this is just an in depth look at China which includes a lot of information the tv and papers don't write about. Recommended.
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Winner Take All: China's Race For Resources and What It Means For Us
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