Customer Reviews


31 Reviews
5 star:
 (24)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sound stuff
In my head there is a spectrum of interestingness for science that runs from geology to the really weird bits of physics. I have never yet found a popular science writer, however good, who can make geology truly interesting, while something like quantum physics is so fascinating (and strange) that it takes little effort to make it fascinating (though it's hard to make it...
Published 13 months ago by B. M. Clegg

versus
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tenuous links and structure start to grate after a while
I gave the book the benefit of the doubt after reading some other amazon reviews, but I have to say that I agree with those that criticise the narrative framework;

The author uses a picture of a roof terrace as a device to illustrate a range of materials, each one of which then forms the basis of a chapter on that material.

It feels a little gimmicky...
Published 10 months ago by Matt


Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Eclectic but facsinating, 15 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Good read in bed. Interesting chapters about things you thought you knew all about OR didn't ever thing about.
Each chapter covers the subject from angles that one would probably not have considered or questioned. One chapter a night, easy reading and some thing to sleep on.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Bought this for me but my 11 year old son hasnt put it down, 13 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A well written and engaging book - it makes you think twice about the world we take for granted.

It has kept my son gripped which given that it is competing with Xbox's and all sorts of gadgets is impressive.

An interesting and entertaining read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Stuff really does matter, 2 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Thanks Mark for your exquisitely detailed and almost poetic description of some of our most significant materials. Chocolate was sensational and I'm particularly looking forward to reading that chapter again, and again!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Materials book, 31 Aug 2013
By 
Mr. A. Wills (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A great, engaging book. Surprisingly engaging for a book that takes you deep into materials and a very personal story too. I really enjoyed this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A material education, 31 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A fascinating introduction to materials science. Technical but not abstruse: just right for the interested, but on-screen reader. A variety of approaches and styles in the different chapters lends interest. Well worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Get Hooked., 21 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this book after pausing to read a review in an old copy of the Guardian I was using to line the chicken coop. Essentially grounded in the Arts, I remain curious about the world around me; and I had heard the author talk about stainless steel cutlery on popular science programme on the radio. He struck me as a natural communicator, so I gave it a shot: all those other materials around me I took for granted such as paper, concrete, plastic and glass were revealed in a new light. I was enthused and encouraged to regard objects not so much as "blobs of differently coloured matter" as "complex expressions of human needs and desires."
Why don't I taste my spoon when I'm eating cornflakes? Can buildings heal themselves? What part did materials science play in the Paralympics? How could I ever again use newsprint for something other than its intended purpose without marvelling at its inner structure?
Why not try a sample and get hooked? You'll love it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Really interesting book!, 12 Aug 2013
By 
M. Reeve (Norfolk, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The author does not disappoint - although it's a factual book, I found it as difficult to put down as I would a work of fiction. Really fascinating with lots of anecdotes to keep it lively, and gives it a personal touch. Would recommend to anyone interested in science or really, our man-made world in any way!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars ubiquitous stuff that does matter!, 11 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Mark's book is a must read for any enquiring mind; written with verve and wit; you will enjoy it no end!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stuff, 22 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I saw a review of this book in the Sunday Times and decided it would be a good book to read on holiday. Didn't like the advertised price - thought I could do better on Amazon. I searched, I found, I purchased. It arrived in a reasonable time( I still don't know why it takes so long by post - even 2nd class). A fascinating read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tenuous links and structure start to grate after a while, 31 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I gave the book the benefit of the doubt after reading some other amazon reviews, but I have to say that I agree with those that criticise the narrative framework;

The author uses a picture of a roof terrace as a device to illustrate a range of materials, each one of which then forms the basis of a chapter on that material.

It feels a little gimmicky as a device, yet my real bugbear was that it rarely seemed to dig very deep beneath the surface; it seemed to be a mix of a litre history of the material, a little of the authors own experiences (not really necessary in my opinion), a little of what frankly is probably general knowledge, and then a little material sciences

I don't mean to sound overly critical but - and I am not a scientist by any stretch of imagination - it just didn't challenge or interest me in the way that I had hoped it would
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews