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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Is the truth always worth the hassle?
By the time I reached the middle of this book I honestly couldn't care less who killed Ruth Lennox, whose murder starts the story off.
By this time I was totally immersed in the increasingly odd behaviour of Frieda Klein, psychotherapist, still recovering from injuries received in the previous book in the series, cut off from police work and becoming more obsessive...
Published 12 months ago by Penny Waugh

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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dense and Dark as Christmas pudding
I too, had been "Waiting for Wednesday' with bated breath... well at least mild curiosity...

Worrying about Dr. Klein and wondering whether the un-dead will find her out... And how could she have waved suitable Sandy away across the Atlantic?

However it would be unrealistic for the Nicci French conjoined twinned pair to believe that their readers...
Published 10 months ago by Mrs. Katharine Kirby


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dense and Dark as Christmas pudding, 16 Oct 2013
By 
Mrs. Katharine Kirby "Kate" (HELSTON, Cornwall United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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I too, had been "Waiting for Wednesday' with bated breath... well at least mild curiosity...

Worrying about Dr. Klein and wondering whether the un-dead will find her out... And how could she have waved suitable Sandy away across the Atlantic?

However it would be unrealistic for the Nicci French conjoined twinned pair to believe that their readers could comfortably carry the thread of back-story in its entirety from each of this weekday series, published with periods of a year or so between. Eventually, the whole collection will be available together and then of course one will flow happily into another with no interruption.

Meanwhile it is reassuring that even after the first chapter the tide comes back in reviving our acquaintance with Dr. Frieda Klein, the insomniac psychotherapist, Josef her Ukrainian handyman, DCI Karlsson and others from Blue Monday: A Frieda Klein Novel (Frieda Klein 1) and Tuesday's Gone (Frieda Klein 2) re-immersing the reader in a satisfying history of characterisation with reasonable ease.

I am a sucker for a plot line that exposes an `Everyday Housewife' as having a secret life; but it does take rather a while to get around to her, as you have to be 'caught up', that is after the initial shock of the gruesome discovery of her mashed up corpse (de rigueur for such a book). I liked the way the time it takes to cook a tray of biscuits could establish a time of death but otherwise I had little in common with Ruth Lennox and never felt her jump off the page, or engage.

The Winnie the Pooh style map on the end papers is a distraction, its meaning, well for me anyway, only became clear in the last few pages. So I wasted a fair bit of time referring to it and finding The Wandle wanting. In fact there are so many balls in the air it became irritating, too many threads in this tapestry. I was just getting somewhere with one plot line when we rushed over to another sad scene. It felt like several different books. In this sense it becomes clear that two people have written this, no one author would have the energy to create such a leviathan, with numerous twisty, turning, themes all thickly and tightly packed in.

There are so many names to get hold of (some strangely Essex related - Margaretting, Ingatestone) that it feels more like a jig saw puzzle than a story.

By Wednesday this series is in danger of collapsing under its own weight. Too huge a commitment is demanded, it became head achey. Certain worries remain unresolved still and we are all probably sick of waiting for Frieda to actually relax into that bath...

p.s. the hair cutting parable was rather 'brushed over' in the end wasn't it?
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Is the truth always worth the hassle?, 3 Sep 2013
By 
Penny Waugh "A reader" (UK) - See all my reviews
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By the time I reached the middle of this book I honestly couldn't care less who killed Ruth Lennox, whose murder starts the story off.
By this time I was totally immersed in the increasingly odd behaviour of Frieda Klein, psychotherapist, still recovering from injuries received in the previous book in the series, cut off from police work and becoming more obsessive by the page. At first she simply exasperated me but I soon began to worry seriously for her as she set off, without any apparent regard for her own or anyone else's safety, following up nebulous leads with other obsessed people. She is a loose cannon who gets results, but oh what a palaver. Also she felt to me like someone much older than her stated age of thirty-eight, though she is poles apart from Miss Marple or Miss Silver.
Her policeman friend, DCI Karlsson, has his own problems and the murder case has many tangents and takes blood, sweat and tears to work out.
To me this book was Frieda, craving peace but unable to find it, and with a house full of noisy oddities - the saga of the bath should add a lighter touch but somehow it doesn't.
I have rarely felt so taken over by a book character, and for that I congratulate the authors. I can't say the experience was entirely enjoyable, but it certainly kept me reading and I truly need to know what will happen to Frieda next.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable series, 30 July 2013
By 
Love Books "Jessie" (Durham, England) - See all my reviews
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This is the third in the 'days of the week' Nicci French Frieda Klein books and a novel I'd been looking forward to reading for some time.

It starts with the murder of Ruth Lennox, an apparently perfect wife and mother of three and at first everyone is perplexed about the death while her husband takes to drink to come to terms with it and the children do their best to stay on the rails.

At the same time Frieda has received a chilling message from the man who's been stalking her since he didn't die at the end of the Monday book. And the gaggle of assorted waifs and strays who make up her friends remain as hopeless and endearing as ever.

This book lost a star because there's far too much recapping at the beginning and it just isn't necessary. We need to know about the stalker man, but we don't need a potted history of everything that happened in the Monday and Tuesday books, it's really annoying and doesn't move the story on at all. It would have lost another star for having a very similar sub-plot (involving Frieda being stitched up by the press) but I won't spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it yet.

This is a four star read though. I love Frieda, I love her assorted friends, and I love the way Nicci French writes about teenagers in all the surly sweetness. Another very good read. Hurry up Thursday!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointingly average, 4 Oct 2013
I enjoyed the previous two Frieda Klein novels and was eagerly 'Waiting for Wednesday'. However I was disappointed with this one. In my opinion it lacked the suspense I have become used to reading 'Nicci French' and at times I felt I was struggling through the book.
I don't think I will be waiting for Thursday or Friday however I intend to read more 'non-serialised' Nicci French.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Please return to non-series novels!, 9 Oct 2013
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I used to love Nicci French novels. And then came Blue Monday introducing Frieda Klein - who is a great character but the preposterous ending ruined it for me. The Tuesday book was worse and I can't even finish Waiting for Wednesday which is so full of back-story it makes it quite jarring to read. The creepy 'edge' to Nicci French books seems to have gone too - as these are little more than police procedure books. Not sure I'll be waiting for the Thursday book but if the authors decided to write a non-Frieda Klein book then this reader will be back on board as their earlier stuff was brilliant.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Gloomy, 26 Sep 2013
By 
Marand (Warwickshire) - See all my reviews
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The third in the Frieda Klein series (after Blue Monday and Tuesday's Gone) is certainly no barrel of laughs and is in parts quite heavy going.

There are two story strands - the brutal murder of a seemingly blameless wife and mother, and the investigation by a retired reporter of a series of disappearances of young women - interwoven with psychotherapist Klein's increasing personal torments as she slowly recovers from a serious injury.

This doesn't really work as a stand-alone novel as many of the characters reappear from the first two books without their back-stories being given here. More importantly, Klein's personal conflicts (which inform a lot of what happens in Waiting for Wednesday) stem from the earlier books and could be seen as deeply irrational if the reader has not gone through the series in order.

The character of Klein is well realised, but the amount of time she spends in a self-pitying fug in this story does not make her a particularly dynamic or likeable lead. The supporting cast, who seem largely to have been affected by the same gloom, are not so fleshed out and in a couple of cases (such as repugnant rival Hal Bradshaw) they are two-dimensional caricatures. The pace of the plot is maintained reasonably well and the writing style is enjoyable, although a few times the descriptive passages got out of hand and lapsed into shopping lists.

Overall I preferred the first two parts of the series, and I hope she cheers up a bit in time for Thursday.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful - but don't start here..., 28 July 2013
By 
Welsh Annie (Wetherby) - See all my reviews
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There's always something a little unsatisfactory about reviewing the third book in a series. If you've read and loved the first two - Blue Monday and Tuesday's Gone - as I have, I must report that I thought this was the best yet. If you haven't, don't start with this one - although there are a few attempts to summarise what's gone before, there are aspects you really won't understand and appreciate, like Frieda's chaotic relationships, the significance of Dean, the back stories of all the characters and the significance of their actions. Nicci French - the husband and wife writing team of Nicci Gerrard and Sean French - has (have?) written some wonderful earlier psychological thrillers, so if you haven't read any of their work before I'd recommend starting with one of them. This series, featuring psychotherapist Frieda Klein, is something of a departure from their previous books, but has the same engrossing story lines, well drawn characters (particularly, but not exclusively, the women), and palpable sense of tension.

The story opens when the body of Ruth Lennox - apparently the perfect wife and mother - is found by her daughter. As the investigation gets underway, it transpires that there was a lot more to Ruth's life than met the eye. Frieda - still recovering from her experience in Tuesday's Gone - connects with the family through her niece Chloe (as infuriating as ever) who is friendly with the eldest son Tom. While the police's efforts to solve the case continue, with a more in-depth look at the characters of DCI Karlsson and DC Yvette Long, Frieda (who is no longer working with the police) is side-tracked into another investigation by a chance comment made by a patient. She pairs up with Jim Fearby, an elderly journalist with an obsession for the truth, and the whole story is played out with Frieda's own fragile mental state becoming increasingly evident. All the same characters are here - Sandy, her sister-in-law Olivia, the wonderful Josef who originally met Frieda by falling through her roof and in this book is "helping" by refurbishing her bathroom. And in the shadows - always - is that sinister character.

The writing is as excellent as ever, and I really can't agree with some of the criticisms I've read of it as repetitive or as police procedural - there are some very short and essential diversions to pursue the narrative, but the heart and focus of this book is Frieda who becomes more and more fascinating as the series develops. I didn't guess the ending - but I really didn't want to, I just wanted to be swept along and discover it with Frieda. This is a wonderful addition to the series - please just don't start here. I can't wait for Thursday...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I always expect a treat, 13 July 2013
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Every year I look froward to the new Nicci French - and they don't disappoint. Waiting for Wednesday looked like a big book when it arrived and the reading experience felt somehow more spacious than in the earlier volumes. Perhaps this was due to the large cast of characters (all nicely differentiated), perhaps it might have been due to the amount of ground covered by Frieda or by the obsessed ex-journalist Jim Fearby as he criss-crosses the country on the trail of a killer that no-one else can see. There are two main plots in this novel and no facile linkages except for Frieda. Almost no easy answers at all, in fact. It's going to be hard to wait another year for Thursday ...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars predictable, 28 Jan 2014
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The plot is becoming increasingly predictable with each instalment of the Klein novels. And for me the characters are becoming a little irritating in their predictability.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hard work, 25 Oct 2013
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I'd read the first two in the series and enjoyed them, so this one was a let down. Really disjointed and hard to follow. Wouldn't recommend.
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Waiting for Wednesday (Frieda Klein, Book 3) (Frieda Klein 3)
Waiting for Wednesday (Frieda Klein, Book 3) (Frieda Klein 3) by Nicci French (Paperback - 30 Jan 2014)
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