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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars gripping and wild
As one would suspect from a superb songwriter and photographer this a work of quality written in an easy but literary style. Funny but also profound when that is needed.

A rather amazing tale of a guy born and raised in utter poverty in postwar UK and then realizing his teenage dream and more with The Hollies before being turned on by the likes of David Crosby...
Published 10 months ago by Bodhi Heeren

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A tale of two bands
Graham Nash's autobiography opens in August 1968. At that time he was at a crossroads in his musical career. He was a founder member of the Hollies, the phenomenally successful Manchester band that had had a string of hits in the sixties, but he had come to realise that the sort of music they performed didn't interest him any more. He was increasing becoming more and more...
Published 7 months ago by Bantam Dave


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 27 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Wild Tales (Kindle Edition)
Great book good to hear him talk about his mum and her pub it was my local when she ran it .seen graham nash one Christmas when he came to see her at the pub
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Straightforward account of some crazy times, 21 Oct 2013
This review is from: Wild Tales (Hardcover)
I enjoyed this book. I'm no expert on CSNY - I've played "So Far" in the car for years but didn't know much about the band's history or Graham Nash's time with the Hollies and certainly haven't read any other books about them - but from that perspective the book was ideal. A chronological narrative of Nash's life told in a straightforward style and pleasant tone.

Detail of Nash's poor background in Salford was especially interesting, and in many ways his life reflects the opening up of opportunities in the post-war world. And his really quite sudden transformation from happy-go-lucky Lancashire lad with the Hollies to West Coast hippy with CSNY epitomises the shock of the 1960s.

I did find the book a little unreflective and Nash perhaps just a little too pleased with himself and emotionally unengaged. Surely, for example, there's more to be said about free love and the vast amount of drugs consumed than the rather stock attitudes here. David Crosby's decent into drug hell is catalogued in some detail but I found it an oddly matter-of-fact account from someone claiming to be a dear friend. So I wouldn't look at this book for blazing new insights into what happened - but it's certainly a very capable account of what did.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, needs editing, 19 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Wild Tales (Hardcover)
As a writer, Graham Nash is a great singer. This autobiography is not an easy read, as the style is lazy and much too colloquial. It seems to have been put together for the US market as it's full of American slang and words I had to look up. It reads like a first draft, with many errors (some pointed out in another review here) and streams of thought that go unfinished. I LOVE Graham Nash, always have, since he was in the Hollies, but this book is in need of a good editor
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5.0 out of 5 stars Graham tells it like it is, 23 July 2014
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This review is from: Wild Tales (Kindle Edition)
This is a very honest appraisal of events and memories from one of musics long time survivors. Graham tells it like it is, and its really amazing, that many of his close colleagues such as David Crosby are still thankfully with us and still creating those remarkable melodies that have been their trademark for so long.The book spans many decades and gives many insights into life as a pop star with some fascinating stories told in a really easy to read style.I would have no hesitation in recommending "Wild Tales"
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25 of 32 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars .....Fairy Tales, 30 Sep 2013
By 
Boswell (Cheshire UK) - See all my reviews
This biography is full of errors and untruths. Nash seems to have made a lot of it up!
He claims to have been singing "Anna" "Mickeys Monkey" & "You Really Got A Hold On Me" back in 1960. Funny that, they were only released in 1962. So Helen Shapiro had a hit with "Misery" did she? No,it was Kenny Lynch. Salford is a nine mile walk from The Free Trade Hall is it? I would say a mile max. Joey Dee and The Starlighters became The Young Rascals did they. Fraid not! The Two Js became the Oasis in November 1962 yet Nash was still drinking coffee in the Two Js two years later. (and it was in the basement not on the ground floor) Delaney & Bonnie were on the "Apple" label were they...NO. The Beatles were turned down by Decca in early 1962 and not 1963 as he claims. The Animals recorded "House Of The Rising Sun" after a Donovan session did they. "Rising Sun" was released in 1964 and Donovan's first recording session was in 1965.
It's no exaggeration to say that there are dozens and dozens of examples like this. I think Nash needs to re-write this book after checking his facts. In the end the errors become annoying. Make sure you have a good supply of salt whilst reading!
As a last example he claims that John Lennon told him he couldn't remember the words to "Anna" and the Beatles were recording it on their first album the next day. So Nash taught him the words ....RUBBISH!! He says both The Hollies and The Beatles were playing in Manchester on the same night and the conversation took place after their respective gigs. The night in question was Friday 22nd February 1963. The Hollies played at The Twisted Wheel and The Beatles played at The Oasis (I was there!) The Beatles had already recorded their first album on February 11th. So I don't think Lennon needed to learn the words to "Anna", which was already part of their set.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nash's Wild Tales of self indulgence, 18 Sep 2013
By 
Mr. A. W. Riggs "bernard shakey" (Wallington, Surrey United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Nash's bio is an interesting read with some great photos (although not enough) of the halcyon era for music (1968-1972). Nash's story contains a warts 'n all view of the Laurel Canyon set, no real surprises in terms of the drugs, who slept with who, the egos and the making of some fine music along the way. Some interesting stories, Nash doesn't cover himself in glory when complaining that in Neil Young's book Heavy Peace Neil mentions his dog more than CSN! Nash is a survivor with a story to tell although at times I think he tends over state his contribution to music in the last 40 years having only released a handful of records since 1975! Much of this has been covered in Crosby's two books, Dave Zimmer's fine books CSN & CSNY & to a lesser depth in Neil Young's 'Heavy Peace'.

Nash tends to view things with rose tinted glasses and really fails to get to grips as to how all the potential of CSN (Y) failed to reach the heights they should after the CSN debut and Deja Vu. Throughout the book Nash tells us it's all about the music - and that CSN never stop writing new songs? Well if you look at their back catalogue that doesn't support that statement. A covers record that was abandoned, a poor live record and a truly atrocious CSNY record 'Looking Back'. Nash is honest enough to say records like Innocent Eyes didn't work but manages to skip over Stills tour-de-force Manassas.

On reflection this book demonstrates that the CSN debut was his career high the rest whiffs of self indulgence.
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5.0 out of 5 stars From the Hollies to CSN, 10 July 2014
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This review is from: Wild Tales (Kindle Edition)
Excellent story about the young man from the slums to the rock star multimillionaire. His charity work is legendary. He I a great humanitarian.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable read, 9 July 2014
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This review is from: Wild Tales (Kindle Edition)
A thoroughly enjoyable read. It didn't necessarily reveal anything revelatory but it was great to read from Graham's perspective. Would have loved more depth on recording the albums and at least a mention to the last 3 CSN(Y) albums. The 90s onwards were skimmed over at pace but it's always the formative years of the group that seem to appeal to many. Well worth a read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 5 July 2014
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This review is from: Wild Tales (Paperback)
Excellent - great read
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5.0 out of 5 stars A rare thing, an excellent rock autobiography, 1 July 2014
By 
A. Murphy (Birmingham, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Wild Tales (Kindle Edition)
As a big fan of vocal harmony music, i got into the Everly Brothers by the early 60's, so it follows that i loved The Hollies (harmony wise, the best of the 60's bands). I also loved Crosby, Stills, and Nash, and as i like rock/pop biography, i had to get this book.
Autobiographies can obviously be biased towards the writer, but i found this one very honest (i'd remembered Graham Nash's spat with George Harrison regarding the Hollies version of 'If i needed someone', and wondered if he would 'forget' it, but he didn't).
It has all you'd want, great stories from the 60's and 70's, loads of stuff i didn't know (an Eagle singing on Wasted on the way?!).
This was a good read, and rarely put it down whilst on holiday. Recommended.
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Wild Tales by Graham Nash (Hardcover - 26 Sep 2013)
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